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Joint sizes vary, depending on personal preferences, number of people involved in the smoke session and type of celebration. Determining how much weed should be rolled into a joint was previously subject to great debate, often resulting in either underwhelming highs or unfinished roaches.

But now, new data published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence by drug policy researchers Greg Ridgeway of the University of Pennsylvania and Beau Kilmer of the Rand Corporation suggests how much cannabis you should be rolling into a joint.

That amount is 0.32 grams.

“These estimates can be incorporated into drug policy discussions to produce better understanding about illicit marijuana markets, the size of potential legalized marijuana markets, and health and behavior outcomes,” said the researchers.

Relevance of Study

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Many organizations and businesses can benefit from the group’s study. For policymakers and scientists, the amount can be used as a standard for new laws and clinical trials. Additionally, medical dispensary owners could use the amount to streamline their pre-rolled joint offerings in the store, which would ensure that patients or recreational buyers receive consistent doses.

The researcher’s study included roughly 10,000 participants who were previously arrested for marijuana-related charges between 2000 and 2010. This information was derived from an outdated federal program called ADAM. The program was filled with all kinds of interesting information, such as detailed accounts of arrests, specific quantities of weed that led to the charges and black market prices for illegal marijuana.

To arrive at the golden figure of 0.32 grams, researchers simply took the average of the relevant data. The average proposed weight in the paper is accurate by +/- 0.03 grams. “Some arrestees report the weight of loose marijuana purchased and the purchase price, while other arrestees report the number of joints purchased and the purchase price,” said Ridgeway and Kilme.

Previous Reports and Discrepancies

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In the past decade, this topic was covered extensively using controversial methods by numerous establishments in the industry. A different survey from a leading cannabis publication that questioned over 3,000 individuals revealed that 0.32 grams may not be entirely accurate. In the report, the suggested average amount was 0.75 grams. Furthermore, over 33 percent of the survey respondents claimed that they were rolling at least a gram of marijuana per joint. The difference with this survey and the study conducted by Ridgeway and Klime was the data used to arrive at their respective conclusions. The survey from the weed publication relied on feedback from readers, which could have been inflated or inaccurately computed (it’s uncommon for people to weigh small batches of weed before rolling a joint on a personal, recreational level).

In another study conducted during a time when weed was still considered taboo for scientists, researchers replaced cannabis with oregano and forced participants to measure how much weed was in an average joint. The results showed that people were highly inclined to stuff more herb in blunts and joints, compared to pipes.

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