Jamaica Plans to Prescribe Marijuana at Airports

Jamaica Plans to Prescribe Marijuana at Airports

Jamaica’s Cannabis Licensing Authority (CLA) hopes to install airport and seaport kiosks that give tourists permits to legally purchase and consume cannabis on the island.

The CLA’s proposed law would also allow tourists with existing cannabis prescriptions (in medical states or nations) to obtain this permit as soon as they land in Jamaica. Those without existing cannabis prescriptions could “self-declare” and receive a permit to carry up to two ounces throughout their stay.

The CLA anticipates this regulation will take another few weeks to finalize, but sounds confident that this process to streamline cannabis purchases will come to fruition, as Chairman Hyacinth Lightbourne said that

“The thought is that if you are coming out of the airport, there is a kiosk that you can go to. So basically whoever is coming out of immigration can go to that desk and register and get that clearance.”

Jamaica legalized medical marijuana and decriminalized recreational cannabis in early 2015, and the CLA is still setting up the nation’s regulatory framework that includes licensed medical marijuana dispensaries. Since Jamaica will only have medical marijuana for legal sale–and not retail shops like in Colorado–these airport and seaport kiosks would make it easy for tourists to legally purchase island bud.

With this innovative move, Bob Marley’s home nation appears poised to become a leading destination for cannabis tourism.

Bernie Canter

Massachusetts Will Vote to Legalize Marijuana This Fall

Massachusetts Will Vote to Legalize Marijuana This Fall

Marijuana legalization has made the November ballot in Massachusetts. With north of 25,000 signatures supporting the initiative, legalization proponents successfully gathered well over the necessary 10,792 signatures to qualify.

As long as at least 10,792 of those signatures are certified as legitimate, a foregone conclusion, then Massachusetts’ voters will decide the state’s legal cannabis future come this fall. Should voters approve the Massachusetts Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Initiative, the state would become the fifth to adopt legal cannabis.

The proposal would “allow the use, cultivation, possession, and distribution of recreational marijuana for individuals at least 21 years old.” Like in Colorado and other legal states, the initiative strives to regulate cannabis like alcohol and set up a legitimate legal cannabis market.

This decision would supplement the state’s current medical marijuana law which Massachusetts  has had been in place since 2013; the state’s dispensaries began opening last summer. If the initiative passes, Massachusetts would become the first East Coast state to adopt a fully legal marijuana policy.

However, Massachusetts is not the only state that could join Colorado, Oregon, Alaska and Washington as a legal state. With California, Nevada, Arizona, and Maine also voting on legalization this fall, the United States could conceivably have nine legal marijuana states (plus the District of Columbia) by November.

The “cannabis election” is shaping out as a major story this fall, and one that could provide far more excitement than the Clinton-Trump debacle. Stay tuned and cast your vote for cannabis come November 8!

Bernie Canter

 

Colorado Sold $27 Million Worth of Concentrates (aka Dabs) in April

Colorado Sold $27 Million Worth of Concentrates (aka Dabs) in April

Image via 710 Labs

Marijuana flower is certainly big business in Colorado, but that flower has some stiff competition from its more potent relative: dabs.

Dabs or cannabis concentrates, the modern form of hashish, have seen an astounding rise in Colorado’s legal cannabis market over the last couple of years. This April, Colorado reportedly sold an astounding $27 million worth of retail dabs.

That significant figure represents a quarter of the Colorado retail market’s total sales for April. It’s also a 133% rise in sales numbers in contrast to last year’s April concentrate sales in Colorado. On 4/20 alone, concentrate sales rose 250% from their average daily numbers.

Clearly, while concentrates have yet to surpass flower, consumers are seeking this more potent, faster-acting alternative to dried herb. This modern marijuana market is an ever-evolving one that has expanded far beyond your mom and pop’s “weed.”

From edibles to tinctures to yes, marijuana for menstrual paints, the future of marijuana is unwritten. Bernie Canter

Colorado Bans Medicated Marijuana Gummy Bears

Colorado Bans Medicated Marijuana Gummy Bears

Last Friday, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper signed a bill into law that effectively bans any THC-infused gummy products that resemble bears, animals, fruits and even people.

Citing concerns that these edibles are too enticing for young children, the new law will force some edible companies to change their designs. The law goes into effect on July 1, so companies have a little over two weeks to acclimate to this change.

Since legalization, Colorado’s world-leading regulation of cannabis has been a constant, fluid work-in-progress that adjusts on the fly. While many consumers may be sad to see these playful edibles leave the market, this change represents the natural evolution of a legitimate industry.

While cannabis chocolates may be here to stay, the future of ingestible cannabis products may very well be in bland pill capsules and tincture bottles that represent pharmaceutical products. Keeping edibles out of young children’s systems should and will remain a priority.

Bernie Canter

Ohio Officially Becomes America’s 25th Medical Marijuana State

Ohio Officially Becomes America’s 25th Medical Marijuana State

Governor John Kasich signed Ohio’s medical cannabis bill into law yesterday making the midwest state America’s 25th official medical marijuana state.

An outspoken critic of medical marijuana, Kasich waited two weeks to sign the bill which was approved by both the state’s House and Senate in late May. The governor likely approved this bill since it’s a restrictive one that prevents Ohio’s medical cannabis patients from inhaling marijuana smoke.

As is the case in similar restricted medical marijuana states like New York and Minnesota, the law permits patients to vaporize and ingest edibles, tinctures, and cannabis pills. Qualifying patients are prohibited from growing cannabis in their homes.

In response, a more liberal bill spearheaded by the Marijuana Policy Project that hoped to make November’s ballot recently ended its own campaign. While this decision will prevent Ohio’s patients without chronic health issues from accessing medical marijuana, at least some patients in the state will see safe access.

The program expects to begin serving patients in two years after the licensing and regulatory process has been completed.

Bernie Canter

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