Jelly Belly Founder Introduces New CBD Jelly Beans

Jelly Belly Founder Introduces New CBD Jelly Beans

The Cannabidiol (CBD) industry is so hot right now that everybody from Martha Stewart to Montel Williams is trying to get in on a piece of the action. Now the creator of the original Jelly Belly jelly bean can be added to the list of CBD industry hopefuls.

Candy maker David Klein, the self proclaimed Candyman, created the Rolls-Royce of jelly beans in 1976, and now that CBD is no longer restricted in the United States under the Controlled Substances Act, he had the idea to combine the two to make a come back.

Klein sold his rights to the Jelly Belly name in 1980 in exchange for less than $2.5 million, which he received in the form of $10,000 per month for 20 years. This means that he is not able to label his new CBD-infused-beans with the Jelly Belly name. Instead, Klein’s new jelly beans are branded under the name Spectrum Confections.

“Everything I’ve done in my life was to get me to this point, and I truly believe I’m supposed to help people with my CBD jelly beans,” said Klein.

According to the Spectrum Confections website, they are currently sold out of pre-made product, but wholesale orders will still be accepted. Wholesale orders can be white labeled for self-branded packaging.

CBD Not Included

Spectrum Confections only manufacturers wholesale orders at this time, and unlike many other CBD candy distributors, they do not supply the CBD. Anyone interested in ordering the CBD infused jelly beans must first ship CBD oil or isolate to Spectrum Confections along with certified lab-test results displaying exactly how much CBD and THC is in the product.

Klein then uses the CBD that has been provided by the purchaser to infused his jelly beans. CBD isolate is preferred over the oil, according to Klein, and CBD containing more than 0.30 percent THC will be returned to the purchaser. They will only manufacture products that are legal in the United States, and anything containing more than 0.3 percent THC remains illegal under the Controlled Substances Act.

Original, Sugar Free, and Sour

There are three different types of Spectrum Confections Jelly Beans available in 38 different flavors according to the website: Original Jelly Beans, Sugar Free Jelly Beans, and Sour Jelly beans. One of the sour flavors is called “Sour Cherry Goosebumps.”

In order to “mask the CBD flavor,” the original and sour varieties are mixed with dextrose and malitol is used for the sugar free ones. According to Klein, CBD doesn’t taste great, so it is important to mask the taste of it.

10 Milligrams Each

The recipe used to make Spectrum Confections CBD Jelly Beans produces 10 mg of CBD in each bean. Purchasers are instructed to eat one if they want to consume 10 mg of CBD, eat two if they want to ingest 20 mg, and so on. Compared to many other products, that is delivering a solid dose of CBD in a tiny package. Many other candies containing 10 mg of CBD are eight times the size or more of a jelly bean.  

Two pounds of Jelly Belly Jelly Beans go for about $10.50 on Amazon, but the price of the Spectrum Confections Jelly Beans remain a mystery until you contact the company to place an order.

The Come Back…Again

This is not the first come back that the Candyman has attempted in recent years. Klein turned to Kickstarter in 2016 to crowd source funding for his new Coffee House Original Jelly Beans which were infused with caffeine and came in flavors like Chai Tea. He successfully raised $13,650 from 232 contributors.

Klein is also currently working on a creation he calls Polar Corn, a popcorn treat that you “freeze and eat.”

Photo Courtesy of Spectrum Confections

Legal Cannabis Spurs Increase in Cookie Sales, According to Study

Legal Cannabis Spurs Increase in Cookie Sales, According to Study

Furthering the mystery of the cannabis-induced munchies, adults with safe, reliable access to legal recreational-cannabis spend more money on cookies, ice cream, and chips than their counterparts, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Connecticut and Georgia State University reviewed high-calorie-food sales-data from states that have legalized cannabis, and a correlation was observed.

The retail-data analysis covered more than 2,000 counties over a period of a decade, from 2006 to 2016. Only states that could provide at least 18 months of sales-data for the period after a legalization amendment was enacted were included in the data review. Purchase trends from grocery, convenience, drug, and mass distribution stores were included in the analysis.

Michele Baggio, assistant professor of economics at the University of Connecticut, partnered with Alberto Chong, a professor at Georgia State University’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, to conduct the data review. Most of the data was contributed by the Nielsen Retail Scanner database.

The Data Review

Immediately following legalization, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington reported an increase in the purchase of junk foods, specifically those of cookies, ice cream, and chips, according to the study.

Chip purchases increased by 5.3 percent. Cookie sales grew by 4.1 percent, and a 3.1 percent increase was observed in the sale of ice cream. While cookie sales maintained steady growth, there was a slight dip in ice cream and chip sales for a short time after legalization. Ultimately, an increase was observed overall.

“The increase in sales starts at the time the legislation becomes effective,” according to the study published in the Social Science Research Network.

Legalization amendments were approved by voters in Colorado and Washington state in 2012. The legal retail market in Colorado was first to explode, while the Washington market took a little longer to kick off. In 2015, Oregon joined the ranks of Colorado and Washington in the legalization of recreational cannabis.

“These might seem like small numbers, but they’re statistically significant and economically significant as well,” said Baggio.

The brands which saw the most increase in product sales were not reported in the study.

Originally intending to study the effect of legal cannabis on obesity rates, Baggio and Chong focused only on sales trends this time instead. Baggio said he plans to continue searching for links between legalization and obesity as well as other trends correlating with cannabis policy reform.

“I’m just interested in whether there are unintended consequences to the policy,” he said.

Why does cannabis sometimes stimulate a hunger response?

While the source of cannabis-induced munchies remains mostly a mystery, a 2014 study published in Nature Neuroscience suggests that it begins with an enhanced sense of smell.

According to the study, the sensitivity of receptors in the olfactory bulb of rats and humans increases with the administration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most prevalent psychoactive cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. This increased sensitivity to certain smells may translate into an increased craving for certain foods.

While THC is known to stimulate a hunger response, tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) is known to illicit the opposite response. Cannabis strains high in THCV are advertised as the go-to phenotypes for those trying to lose weight or at least avoid the munchies.

Photo by Oleg Magni from Pexels

Women Who Use Cannabis Are More Likely To Have Satisfying Orgasms, Study Reveals

Women Who Use Cannabis Are More Likely To Have Satisfying Orgasms, Study Reveals

Women who consume cannabis before sex have better orgasms than those who do not, according to new data.

As the legalization movement continues to expand, more people are coming forward with questions and sharing personal experiences regarding how cannabis affects sex. Cannabis lubes are a hot item now and there are strains of flower said to increase arousal. While there is a plethora of anecdotal evidence out there regarding the ways that cannabis can be used to enhance sexual activity, the scientific research is limited.

One team of researchers exploring the relationship between cannabis and sex aims to contribute clinical findings to demystify how cannabis affects different sexual functions, in women specifically, like sex drive, arousal, orgasm, and overall satisfaction.

Inspired by talking to the patients who come to her practice, Becky K. Lynn, MD, is one of the main designers of the newly published study which determined that consuming cannabis before sexual activity can enhance pleasure and satisfaction with orgasms.

“My interest in this realm came from the many patients that I see in my clinic who have confided in me that using marijuana treats their sexual problems,” Lynn said to Weedmaps.

Aiming to examine how women interpret a sexual experience when cannabis has been consumed before hand, this study analyzes first-hand reports about:

  • Overall sexual satisfaction
  • Sex drive
  • Orgasm
  • Dyspareunia (pain during sex)
  • Lubrication

“I have seen it used in women with chronic pain disorders that lead to painful sex, women who experience difficulty with orgasm or an inability to orgasm, and women who use it to improve their libido, which may not match their partner’s libido,” said Lynn

The Study

According to researchers, the specific goal of this cross-sectional study, titled “The Relationship between Marijuana Use Prior to Sex and Sexual Function in Women,” is to “evaluate women’s perceptions of the effect of marijuana use before sexual activity.”

Published online March 1, 2019 in Sexual Medicine, the data was analyzed and interpreted by:

  • Becky K. Lynn, MD
  • Julia D. Lopez, PhD, MPH, LCSW
  • Collin Miller, MSW
  • Judy Thompson, RN, CCRC
  • E. Cristian Campian, MD, PhD

Spanning an 11 month period from March 2016 to February 2017, the study’s sample group consisted of female patients from one obstetrics and gynecology office. The patients were asked to complete an anonymous sexual health survey during their visit to the doctor’s office.

Once a participant was finished with the questionnaire, she would put it directly into a box secured with a lock, and the data was reviewed at a later time.

The Data

There were 373 women in total who completed the questionnaire during their visit to the doctor over the 11 month period in which the study took place. The demographic information shows that most of the study participants were about the same age, were white and identified as heterosexual.

Upon reviewing the information, the sample group of 373 women was divided into two main groups — non-cannabis users and cannabis users.

There were 197 women in the ‘non-cannabis user’ group (52.8 percent) and 176 women were assigned to the ‘cannabis-user’ group. Being assigned to the ‘cannabis-user’ group did not necessarily mean that she consumed before partaking in sexual activities.

According to the data, 34 percent of the ‘cannabis-users’ (127 women) responded yes to using cannabis before sexual activity, while 13.1 percent (49 women) of the ‘cannabis-users’ did not consume before sex, but did at other times.

Of the 127 women who used cannabis before participating in a sexual activity, 2.13 percent reported that they have more satisfying orgasms than those who did not use cannabis. Participants who reported using cannabis frequently, but not necessarily before sex, were 2.10 times more likely to respond yes to having satisfactory orgasms than those who reportedly used cannabis infrequently.

The study states that “most women reported an increases in sex drive, an improvement in orgasm, a decrease in pain, but no change in lubrication.”


The Findings

According to the study’s authors, there were two main outcomes observed:

  1. “Satisfaction in the sexual domains of drive, orgasm, lubrication, dyspareunia, and overall sexual experience.”
  2. “The effect of the frequency of marijuana use on satisfaction.”

Timing was an important factor with the women who reported using cannabis before sex. The proper timing between cannabis consumption and sex was crucial for a “positive effect on orgasm.”

Contributing clinical examples to what we understand about the relationship between cannabis and sex, this study concludes that cannabis can have a positive impact on a woman’s sex life, and more research should be completed on the topic.

Photo Courtesy of Valeria Boltneva from Pexels

THC Provides More Symptom Relief Than CBD, According To New Study

THC Provides More Symptom Relief Than CBD, According To New Study

Cannabidiol (CBD), the non-psychoactive cannabinoid praised for medicinal powers like reducing the severity and frequency of seizures in children suffering from rare and otherwise untreatable forms of epilepsy, may not be the most medically beneficial molecule found in cannabis, according to new data.

The U.S. government and people who are uncomfortable with the high that is produced by the main psychoactive cannabinoid occurring in cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), have accepted CBD with open arms in recent years by adding it to coffee, skincare regimens, and personal lubricant. Meanwhile, THC remains federally illegal under the Controlled Substance Act.

A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports on February 25, 2019, compared data submitted to the Releaf App between June 6, 2016, and March 5, 2018. During that time, 3,341 users of the app reported results from 19,910 different cannabis-use experiences.

This data study is the first to measure how different characteristics of cannabis produce different effects in users.

During the reporting process from the app, users record details like what type of product they are using, what the reported cannabinoid content is, and which method of delivery is being utilized per experience.

The different types of cannabis products reported include:

  • Concentrates
  • Dried flower
  • Edibles
  • Tinctures
  • Topicals

The different methods of delivery include:

  • Smoking or combusting
  • Vaporizing
  • Ingesting
  • Applying topically

Data Tracking

The Releaf App was designed with new medical patients and cannabis users in mind, aiming to help them understand what works best to treat their specific symptoms or condition by tracking how different strains and methods of delivery affect them. The app also records the lab-reported level of each cannabinoid, like THC and CBD, that is in each product. Adverse side effects, like dry mouth and paranoia, are also reported by users.

Users record how they feel before consumption and then again immediately following administration to understand which method provides the most relief.

CBD VS. THC

While the levels of CBD in a product did not correlate with the symptom relief that was reported, the products with higher levels of THC were strongly linked to symptom relief, according to the Releaf App data.

Dried flower was the most commonly used product during the period of time studied. Dried flower with higher levels of THC was the only product reported to provide the greatest overall symptom relief.

Unlike the relief related to levels of THC, higher CBD content did not correlate with symptom relief, according to the data.

While cannabinoids can still be medicinally beneficial when only one is administered at a time, those aware of the entourage effect understand that cannabinoids work most effectively in conjunction with one another.

This data is a prime example of why cannabis should be removed from the Controlled Substances Act so that scientists can finally have access to the plant for research and studies.

THC Causes Genetic Changes To Sperm According To New Study

THC Causes Genetic Changes To Sperm According To New Study

Studies show that men who consume marijuana are more likely to produce semen with a lower concentration of sperm, known as low sperm count, than those who abstain. According to new research from Duke University School of Medicine in North Carolina, smoking cannabis may have an even bigger impact on sperm than previously thought.

The study aimed to learn more about the reproductive effects of a father’s exposure to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most abundant psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, and subsequently how it affects embryo development and the lifetime health of the offspring. Samples from both lab rats and humans were used and compared in the research, and the results from both were similar. The sperm from subjects with higher levels of THC in their urine had more pronounced genetic changes.

Following the study, Duke Health announced that “exposure to cannabis alters the genetic profile of sperm,” but “whether genetic changes can be reversed or are passed on to children is still unknown.” The research paper, “Cannabinoid exposure and altered DNA methylation in rat and human sperm,” was published in the journal Epigenetics on December 19, 2018.

Epigenetics explores the biological mechanisms in DNA that turn genes on and off. THC doesn’t mutate the sperm itself, but it may change the way the genes that are passed on to children are regulated and expressed. Researchers believe this information is significant for men of childbearing age because if a child is conceived from a sperm that was altered by exposure to THC, it may impact the development of the child. It is not yet known whether a THC-altered sperm is even capable of fertilizing an egg.

The research team at Duke Health plans to increase the sample size for future studies to learn more about how THC changes the genetic profile of sperm. “In the absence of a larger, definitive study, the best advice would be to assume these changes are going to be there,” said lead author Susan K. Murphy, Ph.D. “We don’t know whether they are going to be permanent. I would say, as a precaution, stop using cannabis for at least six months before trying to conceive.”

Mother of 2 Says Medical Marijuana Is Saving Her Life

Mother of 2 Says Medical Marijuana Is Saving Her Life

Vanessa Kyrobie is a wife and mother of two children, one boy and one girl, living in Utah. She reports that using medical cannabis has changed her life drastically, and that without it, she may not be here today.

Suffering from a bacterial brain infection, Vanessa’s symptoms include nerve pain, intense body aches, nausea, headaches, insomnia, and more. She is prescribed to take nine different pharmaceuticals every single day to treat her debilitating symptoms, and those pills come with adverse side effects.

The infection left her “essentially bed-ridden,” for a period of time, and her symptoms were so devitalizing that she contemplated suicide. “The nausea was pretty intense, and the pain in my body was beyond unbearable, level eight, nine, 10,” Vanessa said. “I honestly feel if it wasn’t for medical marijuana, I wouldn’t be here.”

“Gabapentin was for nerve pain, Microzene was my anti-nausea,” Vanessa explained. “I haven’t used any of these since switching to medical marijuana.”

Medical Marijuana in Utah

Preferring to vaporize and eat gummies containing a five to one ratio of CBD to THC, now that it is legal in Utah, Vanessa uses medical cannabis three times per day.

Refusing to break the law, Vanessa waited until December 3, 2018, the day the Utah Medical Cannabis Act went into effect, to begin using medical marijuana. Her quality of life has increased dramatically in the short time since implementing this alternative treatment plan that was recommended by her doctor.

“I’m actually having more energy, and I’m sleeping better,” Vanessa said. The pain is now down to level three and four. It’s been life changing for me.”

Medical marijuana will not be available to patients in the Beehive State until 2021 when the “pharmacies,” which will distribute the medication, are expected to open. In the meantime, if a patient is caught bringing medical cannabis into Utah from a neighboring state like Nevada or Colorado, he or she will not be prosecuted as long as it has been recommended as treatment by a physician.

https://www.facebook.com/NessaMaye/posts/10158351241774815

Photos courtesy of KUTV

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