Cancer Center Refuses Donation from Cannabis Club

Cancer Center Refuses Donation from Cannabis Club

In a heartbreaking turn of events, Alberta Health Services (AHS) has refused to accept a donation simply because it comes from a local cannabis company. The Calgary Cannabis Club raised $6,000, in honor of a loved one, to give to the Tom Baker Cancer Centre, but now they have to decide what else to do with the money instead.

It is not easy to understand this decision considering that Canada made history in October 2018 as the second country in the world, after Uruguay, to legalize and regulate cannabis on the federal level.

The funds were raised through an auction event held in memory of former club member, Rick Beaver, who lost his battle to cancer at the age of 65. Beaver went to the Tom Baker Cancer Centre for treatments before he passed away in November of last year. The auction was in December, and the donation was refused by AHS in January.

According to Pat Parsons of the Calgary Cannabis Club, friends and fellow club members intended to give the money to the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Rick’s name, as a way to commemorate him.

Cannabis Medication

Rick was a long time proponent of cannabis as medication, and had a knack for home cultivation. “He was very educated when it came to cannabis,” Parsons said about his friend. “He knew about different treatments that would help him and other people.”

Rick relied heavily on cannabis to combat the debilitating symptoms associated with cancer, and the adverse effects caused by cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation.

“He knew he would be on a lot of other harsher drugs if he wasn’t medicating with cannabis,” Parsons told Global News. “Cannabis gave him as much of his life back as he could have in the later stages of his life which was, I think, a big part of the reason why he chose to stay positive.”

Cannabis Philanthropy

While donations from groups affiliated with cannabis are not currently being accepted, it is possible that this may change in the future.

“Until the engagement is complete and a longer-term perspective on cannabis philanthropy has been determined, AHS will defer accepting any donations from the cannabis sector,” Alberta Health Services said in a statement. “AHS will update its foundation partners about progress of the engagement throughout 2019 and will also provide materials to support board discussions and decision-making related to cannabis.”

With hope for the future, friends of Rick Beaver are still saddened by the current situation. “It was a little bit heartbreaking,” Parsons said. “The cannabis community came together to show our support for Rick, and we thought it would be a thoughtful way to give back to the community. I think part of it is the stigma behind cannabis.”

Rick preached about the benefits of growing at home, so the club may use the money to help other patients who want to follow in his footsteps.

Photo courtesy of Shaw Global News

Canada’s Liquor Stores Will Heavily Outnumber Marijuana Stores On Legalization’s Launch

Canada’s Liquor Stores Will Heavily Outnumber Marijuana Stores On Legalization’s Launch

In case you missed it, Canada’s legal marijuana system goes into effect next week. But new data reveals that access to liquor stores is going to be far greater than planned cannabis store—at least for the time being.

Statistics Canada, a government agency, released the report, which compares the prevalence of liquor stores and planned cannabis stores in each Canadian province, on Wednesday. The team behind the report notes that information about pending private or government-run marijuana shops is incomplete—excepting online retailers, for example.

“Using the agency’s geographic databases, the location of each Canadian household is identified, and the distance from that location to the nearest legal retail outlet is calculated. Averages of these distances are then calculated to determine how generally accessible these products are to Canadians.”

The top-level takeaway is pretty straightforward. Ninety percent of Canadians currently live within 10km (or about six miles) of a liquor store. Only 35 percent of the Canadian population lives within the same distance of a planned cannabis store. Visualized, here’s a look at the access to cannabis and liquor stores based on population density in each province:

Access to liquor stores by province

Population of Canadians with access to a liquor store based on distance. 

1 km 2 km 5 km 10 km More than 10 km
Canada 11,362,355 21,277,831 28,876,635 31,711,644
Newfoundland and Labrador 84,776 158,242 265,484 321,357
Prince Edward Island 20,498 38,328 77,954 107,592
Nova Scotia 207,360 382,390 588,728 738,101
New Brunswick 112,467 229,098 419,581 542,312
Quebec 2,360,006 4,650,155 6,499,149 7,290,334
Ontario 3,460,906 7,835,317 11,587,894 12,770,424
Manitoba 349,046 758,067 913,421 977,472
Saskatchewan 249,628 539,875 746,822 793,642
Alberta 2,591,997 3,336,786 3,554,164 3,704,638
British Columbia 1,908,747 3,323,470 4,168,425 4,402,666
Yukon 4,407 8,264 23,824 26,294
Northwest Territories 9,326 14,648 23,449 29,072
Nunavut 3,191 3,191 7,740 7,740

Access to planned cannabis stores by province

Population of Canadians with access to a planned cannabis store based on distance. 

1 km 2 km 5 km 10 km More than 10 km
Canada 1,440,702 3,797,855 8,757,433 12,194,999
Newfoundland and Labrador 51,424 141,076 274,922 336,714
Prince Edward Island 6,907 29,616 59,576 82,626
Nova Scotia 43,792 135,644 363,855 512,091
New Brunswick 34,833 97,642 290,802 414,181
Quebec 171,052 572,007 1,789,784 3,296,701
Ontario 0 0 0 0
Manitoba 72,366 261,485 747,866 826,490
Saskatchewan 117,606 316,339 684,128 727,937
Alberta 624,382 1,394,464 2,229,038 2,593,820
British Columbia 317,523 846,977 2,302,059 3,381,659
Yukon 817 2,605 15,403 22,780
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0

“Canadians have remarkably good access to liquor stores all across the country with 90 percent living within 10 kilometers of a store,” the report states. “Not surprisingly, their access to cannabis stores immediately after legalization on October 17, 2018 is likely to be much more restricted with only 35 percent of the population dwelling within 10 kilometers of a store.”

“It is emphasized this is a preliminary estimate based on less-than-full information about the number of stores expected to open and their locations. Cannabis accessibility will undoubtedly increase substantially in 2019 and 2020.”

For a comprehensive breakdown on the differences in marijuana legalization implementation for each province, check out this Marijuana Moment analysis.

https://massroots.wpengine.com/news/marijuana-stores-will-hard-find-canadians-day-one-legalization/

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Canada’s Liquor Stores Will Heavily Outnumber Marijuana Stores On Legalization’s Launch

Marijuana Stores Will Be Hard To Find For Most Canadians On Day One Of Legalization

Marijuana Stores Will Be Hard To Find For Most Canadians On Day One Of Legalization

One week from today, Canadian adults will be able to purchase marijuana legally across the country. But the number of stores per province and per capita at this point varies widely, an analysis Marijuana Moment conducted shows.

For residents of Canada’s most and least populous provinces, Ontario and Nunavut, respectively, online ordering will be their only means of legal purchase for the foreseeable future. British Columbia, the third-biggest province in the country with 4.8 million residents, has licensed only one store. Meanwhile, Northwest Territories, with only 44,520 residents, will open six government-run stores, or one per 7,420 residents.

(Note: British Columbia omitted for scale, as it has only one store for 4.8 million residents. Ontario and Nunavut will be online sales only on October 17. Population 2017 per Statistics Canada)

While many of even these preliminary licensed locations will not be operational October 17, by federal law, each province must provide an online purchasing system.

And the provinces have committed to opening more physical stores. Manitoba has set a goal that 90 percent of Manitobans have a 30-minute drive or less to a cannabis store. Ontario was supposed to have 40 stores run through the province by now, but when the new provincial government came into power in June, they decided that cannabis stores will be privately owned, so legislators had to go back to the drawing board on regulations.

Alberta hasn’t set a limit for the overall number of private stores in the province, but each locality will be allowed to set a limit for their area. Hundreds of companies have applied to be retailers.

Each province has set up its own rules and regulations regarding minimum age for sales, possession limits and whether residents can grow plants at home.

As with alcohol, the age at which Canadians can purchase cannabis is lower than in the United States. In Quebec and Alberta, 18 year-olds will be able to purchase adult-use marijuana. In every other province, the legal age will be 19. By contrast, in the U.S., every state that has legalized recreational marijuana to date has set the legal age at 21, which is also the legal drinking age in the states.

In most provinces, four plants can be grown in a household. Quebec and Manitoba are prohibiting home growing; Nunavut is not prohibiting personal growing, but has not defined a limit. New Brunswick has specified conditions to allow plants to be grown outdoors (a locked enclosure 1.52 meters high). British Columbia has specified that home plants must not be visible to the public, and won’t be allowed in day-care homes.

The national standard for purchase and public possession for adults is 30 grams of product of any kind. Quebec has set a limit on household possession at 150 grams, but other provinces have not set limits on how much cannabis can be kept in a private home.

What will make up those 30 grams? Flower, oils and, in provinces that are allowing home growing, seeds and plants. The federal legislation prohibits edibles and concentrates at this time.

Public use of cannabis is the policy that varies the most widely from province to province. Most provinces have adopted the stance that smoking or vaping marijuana will be illegal anywhere smoking or vaping tobacco is not allowed. Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick and Yukon have banned public use (the regulations of the latter two specify backyard use as well as homes). Alberta and Nunavut have left it up to local governments to set regulations. Ontario and Quebec have set specific locations where it will be illegal to consume, including parks, public spaces and bus shelters.

Every province has passed legislation of some form banning cannabis for drivers in vehicles, but legal limits will differ from province to province. Quebec has adopted a “zero tolerance” policy for all drivers, while Ontario is setting zero tolerance for drivers under 21 years of age as well as commercial drivers. Other provinces are developing systems for how driving while impaired will be determined.

With retail stores spare in Ontario and British Columbia, perhaps Regina, Saskatchewan will become the tourist destination of choice for Americans thinking about crossing the border to experience legalization in their northern backyard. Those tourists should be sure to empty their pockets and car before returning to the United States, as the U.S. Customs and Border Protection has promised to crack down on Canadians and U.S. citizens alike.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Marijuana Stores Will Be Hard To Find For Most Canadians On Day One Of Legalization

Canadian Voters Are Way More Worried About Donald Trump Than Marijuana Legalization

Canadian Voters Are Way More Worried About Donald Trump Than Marijuana Legalization

Canadians are more concerned about the actions of the U.S. president south of their border than they are about the impact of marijuana legalization in their own country, a new poll finds.

When asked “How concerned are you feeling about the following issues these days,” 73 percent said they are “extremely” or “very” concerned about Donald Trump, while only 33 percent said the same thing about the legalization of cannabis.

Abacus Data survey results.

Four out of ten Canadians are wholly unconcerned about the end of marijuana prohibition, but only 11 percent feel that way about President Trump.

The survey, conducted by Abacus Data this month and released on Friday, also showed that the greater concern about Trump as compared to marijuana persists across party lines, with Liberal, NDP and Conservative voters all putting the U.S. president ahead of cannabis among their worries.

Abacus Data survey results.

Among all Canadian adults, marijuana legalization was ranked last in their list of concerns, behind gun violence, border crossings, extreme weather, housing affordability and the health care system. Cannabis was also last among Liberal and NDP voters, but Conservatives are less concerned about gun violence and climate and weather issues.

When it came to regional breakouts and residents of big cities vs. other communities, marijuana legalization consistently ranked last among respondents’ worries.

Legal marijuana sales in Canada are expected to begin on October 17.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Canadian Voters Are Way More Worried About Donald Trump Than Marijuana Legalization

Here’s When Canada’s Legal Marijuana Sales Will Begin

Here’s When Canada’s Legal Marijuana Sales Will Begin

Marijuana will officially be legal in Canada on October 17, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced in a speech before the House of Commons on Wednesday.

His minister of health also tweeted the news.

The announcement comes one day after the Senate passed the government’s legalization bill, C-45, in a 52-29 vote, with two abstentions. After about a year of studies and debate over the legislation, the Senate ultimately accepted the amended bill, which was previously approved by the House of Commons, 205-82, on Monday.

The passage represents the fulfillment of a major campaign promise from the Liberal prime minister. Trudeau has argued that the establishment of a regulated cannabis system would prevent underaged youth from accessing marijuana and also deprive criminal organizations of profits from black market sales.

Trudeau held a press conference on Wednesday afternoon to discuss the legalization bill and other pieces of legislation.

The prime minister confirmed the October 17 date to establish the country’s recreational marijuana system, citing the need to provide provinces with sufficient time to develop their own regulatory programs. He also fielded questions about the implications of the home grow provision, the prospect of pardoning former marijuana offenders, and the supply side of the country’s legal marijuana industry.

“I want to remind everyone that the reason we are moving forward on the legalization of marijuana is to better protect our kids, to better protect our communities and to remove the profits from the pockets of organized crime. Obviously the current approach—the current prohibition on marijuana—has not worked to protect our kids, to keep the money out of the pockets of organized crime—and that’s why we’re bringing in a new legalized framework around marijuana.”

Asked whether he expected “chaos” or an orderly rollout of the program on October 17, Trudeau said he was confident that “[i]t will be a smooth success.”

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould cautioned Canadians to refrain from indulging in cannabis use until the law is officially implemented at a press conference on Wednesday, The Times Colonist reported.

“I urge all Canadians to continue to follow the existing law until the Cannabis Act comes into force.”

There is one final step before the marijuana legalization bill is officially sanctioned: Royal Assent. Governor General Julie Payette, a representative of the Canadian monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, must also sign off on the legislation. Victoria Deng, communication advisor for Liberal Sen. George Furey, told Marijuana Moment that the Royal Assent ceremony will take place on Thursday at 9:30am ET.

There have been calls from legalization advocates and certain lawmakers to follow up on the cannabis reform bill with legislation that grants amnesty for Canadians previously convicted of marijuana offenses. But those conversations are on hold, pending the implementation of the recreational marijuana system, Liberal MP Bill Blair, the government’s point person on cannabis legalization, said.

New Democratic Party (NDP) MP Don Davies attempted to get unanimous consent for a measure to “immediately provide pardons for those burdened by criminal records for cannabis offenses that will soon be legal” on Wednesday, Globe and Mail reporter Laura Stone tweeted.

“The motion did not receive unanimous consent, and failed,” she said.

At Wednesday’s press conference, Trudeau said that the government would look at the possibility of amnesty after the new law takes effect but that “[t]here’s no point in looking at pardons while the old law is on the books.”

How we arrived at this historic moment.

It’s been a long, winding road to legalization in Canada, which is set to become the first G7 nation to fully legalize marijuana. The first reading of the bill in the House of Common took place more than a year ago, in April 2017. It’s since gone through rigorous debate, with multiple committees submitting reports that offered recommendations and outlined concerns about the legislation.

One of those issues concerned international travel for Canadians who use cannabis. Conservative lawmakers said that Canadians who admitted to consuming marijuana would be at risk of being permanently barred from entering the United States, where marijuana is federally illegal. The Canadian government issued guidelines emphasizing that traveling across international borders with cannabis will remain illegal under the new law.

More recently, the Senate proposed 46 amendments to the bill—including one that would allow individual provinces to ban home cultivation. The House rejected that proposal and 12 other amendments, sending it back to the Senate for a final, decisive vote. Numerous Conservative senators voiced opposition to the bill—and Conservative Sen. Claude Carignan offered up an amendment to include the home grow provision only to be shut down in a 35-45 vote, with one abstention.

And with that, the bill came to a standing vote on Tuesday. Here’s what it would accomplish.

The Cannabis Act legalizes the possession, use, cultivation and sale of marijuana for adults 18 and older. Individuals will be allowed to possess up to 30 grams of cannabis and grow up to four plants.

The bill also outlines criminal penalties for illegal distribution and sales of cannabis, crossing international borders with cannabis and possession over the legal limit.

https://massroots.wpengine.com/news/canadas-marijuana-legalization-bill-gets-final-approval-lawmakers/

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Here’s When Canada’s Legal Marijuana Sales Will Begin

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