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CCIA Calls For Help Supporting The SAFE Banking Act

CCIA Calls For Help Supporting The SAFE Banking Act

The California Cannabis Industry Association (CCIA) is calling for cannabis businesses to join them in imploring Speaker Pelosi to prioritize the Secure and Fair Enforcement Banking Act (SAFE Banking Act).

Click this link to add your company name and logo to the letter that will be sent to Speaker Pelosi later today. The cutoff time of today, August 4 at 5 pm is quickly approaching. Act now.

What is the SAFE Banking Act?

The SAFE Banking Act is a measure that will allow financial institutions, like banks and credit unions, and insurance providers to work with state-legal, legitimate cannabis businesses without fear of federal prosecution.

Currently, these service providers are not able to work with cannabis businesses because cannabis remains federally illegal under the Controlled Substances Act. More than 30 states, Washington D.C., Guam, and U.S. Virgin Islands have enacted either medicinal or recreational legalization amendments. Cannabis businesses deserve the same access to banking and insurance services as any other legitimate business. The federal government cannot ignore the will of the people, and lawmakers need to hear from you to know that you want them to support the SAFE Banking Act.

This is the email statement from the CCIA about the plan to send a letter:

Now is the time to raise our voices and fight for SAFE Banking on behalf of the entire cannabis community. We have a narrow window to implore Speaker Pelosi to prioritize this legislation. Please lend your name to this crucial effort by 5 pm on 8/4!

CCIA and The Liaison Group have been working tirelessly behind the scenes on SAFE Banking. Our efforts in the spring with California Delegation leaders Correa, Porter and Lieu, were crucial to SAFE making it into the Heroes Act.

SAFE Banking has passed out of the House on two occasions, the latest being part of the Heroes Act (H.R. 6800), however, this bill is yet to be passed by the Senate and signed into law. We need our leadership in California to negotiate that SAFE language remains in the COVID relief act!

We need SAFE Banking to ensure that BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) owned businesses, especially women, have equitable access to funding and for the safety of our employees and our communities. We know that the fight for social justice and cannabis reform are deeply intertwined and that cannabis justice is racial justice. We cannot hope to repair our communities through reinvestment without the appropriate tools, including SAFE Banking.

CCIA will be submitting a letter on behalf of our members to urge Speaker Pelosi to help fight for SAFE Banking. Please use the link below to add your company name and logo by 5 pm 8/4.

https://cacannabisindustry.formstack.com/forms/ccia_safe_banking_letter

We’re in this fight together!

Below is a copy of the letter that the CCIA will send to Speaker Pelosi today:

August 5, 2020

The Honorable Nancy Pelosi 
U.S. House of Representatives 
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Speaker Pelosi:

For the safety of our employees and our communities, we the undersigned implore you to ensure the SAFE Banking Act remains part of COVID relief. As you know, the SAFE Banking passed out of the House on two occasions. The first was standalone bill H.R. 1595 and the second as part of the Heroes Act (H.R. 6800), however, this bill is yet to be passed by the Senate and signed into law. Upon reviewing the Senate response to Heroes, we were disappointed to see SAFE Banking not included, but want to make sure that this important piece of legislation is part of a final negotiated package. We need SAFE Banking to ensure that BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) owned businesses, especially those owned by women, have equitable access to funding. Most notably, BIPOC owners who have been most adversely impacted by the pandemic compared to their white counterparts. Below are just some reasons among many that stress the importance of this relief.

  • Los Angeles’s social equity program, one of the few in the state, was designed to promote equitable ownership in the cannabis industry, but this program has had considerable challenges due to an imbalance of wealth. Although it was intended that Social Equity applicants have the opportunity to be first to market, a group of said applicants were forced to file a lawsuit to achieve fairness in a flawed process, which has now been settled. This is just the first step in an attempt to achieve equity. The majority of Social Equity applicants have not been able to afford the delayed process, nor the start-up costs associated with launching a cannabis business. 
  • BIPOC operators lack access to the capital that is essential to start cannabis businesses, so establishing loan programs would help with this burden. However, even if the SBA were to set up a loan program, this could not be effectuated without access to banks. 
  • Unfortunately, in the states that have equity programs written into their cannabis statutes, BIPOC owners fall prey to predatory business arrangements in which larger cannabis companies will be effectively running the businesses through a management services agreement while the BIPOC owner becomes a figurehead. 
  • Women and BIPOC face significant barriers to accessing investment dollars. Every year women of color get less than 1% of total venture capital funding. Further, data from 2019 indicates that only 200 Latinx and Black individuals nationwide were able to raise over $1 million in venture capital. This number is for all industries, not just cannabis. 
  • The bill is unquestionably part of a holistic approach to ending the War on Drugs, and its devastating effects on communities of color. The longer that BIPOC entrepreneurs have to wait to enter this industry, the greater disadvantage they are at because of larger companies’ ability to build their brands and customer loyalty. 
  • SAFE Banking reduces cash motivated crimes. Cannabis businesses and employees are routinely targeted, robbed, and sometimes attacked because of the large amounts of cash that they are forced to deal with.
  • Lastly, SAFE Banking as included in the Heroes Act (H.R 6800) calls for two diversity studies for the cannabis industry. While these studies will largely tell us what we currently know (that non-white representation in the industry is disproportionately low), this will create an important baseline for future conversations around legalization and ensuring the industry is equitable. 

We know that the fight for social justice and cannabis reform are deeply intertwined and that cannabis justice is racial justice. We cannot hope to repair our communities through reinvestment without the appropriate tools, including SAFE Banking. The events of recent months have shown us that this bill is more important than ever. We urge its swift passage to help our economy and our communities.

Sincerely,

Lindsay Robinson
Executive Director 
California Cannabis Industry Association (CCIA)

Conrad Gregory 
CCIA Board President 
Senior Vice President Harborside

Swetha Kaul
CCIA Board Vice President

Expanding the Paycheck Protection Program to All Cannabis Businesses

Expanding the Paycheck Protection Program to All Cannabis Businesses

Earlier this week, MassRoots obtained a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”), which has been critical to ensuring our employees are paid their regular salaries so they, in turn, have the money they need to support their families, cover medical bills, and pay rent. We believe that all cannabis-related businesses, both plant-touching and ancillary, should be able to obtain PPP loans in order to support the hundreds of thousands of employees that comprise the regulated cannabis industry.

Paycheck Protection Program Equality

We’re asking our supporters, both individuals and businesses, to take the following steps to raise awareness and help cannabis businesses obtain equal access to PPP funding:

  1. Tweet the reasons you support #PPPEquality to @realDonaldTrump, @PressSec and your Senators and Congressmen.
  2. Email the White House and President Trump’s campaign in support of #PPPEquality at [email protected] and [email protected].
  3. Call the White House at 202-456-1111 and your Senators and Congressmen in support of equal access to PPP funding.
  4. If you’re employed in the cannabis industry, please record a video testimonial on how PPP funding would impact your life. You can submit it here or Tweet it, tagging @realDonaldTrump, your Senators and Representatives, and using #PPPEquality. 
  5. Post on Instagram, tagging the White House and your representatives, using #PPPEquality on the reasons why you support cannabis businesses having equal access to PPP loans.

Why is structural reform necessary?

When the U.S. federal government signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act into law on March 27, 2020, one of the measures included in the bill was the Paycheck Protection Program. The PPP is designed to help small businesses and their employees survive during the stay-at-home orders and trying times of the pandemic, which is affecting businesses from all markets.

The PPP website describes the initiative as: 

“An SBA loan that helps businesses keep their workforce employed during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis,” and “a loan designed to provide a direct incentive for small businesses to keep their workers on the payroll.”

While cannabis remains illegal at the federal level, under the Controlled Substances Act, and the new law denies money from the CARES Act to businesses that are federally illegal, these businesses are not operating illegally at the state level. They are tightly regulated by the individual states.

Law-abiding, regulated cannabis businesses, whether plant touching or ancillary, and their employees should be granted the same access to government assistance as any other legally-operating business. 

Now is the time to tell the U.S. government that you think the Paycheck Protection Program should be expanded to include cannabis businesses. Stand up for #PPPEquality with us and all of the other small businesses that make-up the regulated cannabis industry in the United States.

State Financial Regulators Push Congress To Fix Marijuana Banking Problems

State Financial Regulators Push Congress To Fix Marijuana Banking Problems

A coalition of the top financial regulators in 13 states is demanding congressional action to protect banks that serve marijuana businesses.

In a letter sent to congressional leaders late last week, the regulators stressed that conflicting state and federal cannabis laws have inhibited economic growth, created confusion among state banks and credit unions and jeopardized public safety.

“It is incumbent on Congress to resolve the conflict between state cannabis programs and federal statutes that effectively create unnecessary risk for banks seeking to operate in this space without the looming threat of civil actions, forfeiture of assets, reputational risk, and criminal penalties,” the regulators wrote.

“While Congress has taken some action, such as the Rohrabacher amendment prohibiting federal funds being used to inhibit state medicinal marijuana programs, this has been an impermanent approach that requires a permanent resolution.”

Finance officials from Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Louisiana, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah and Washington State signed the letter.

One of the factors that prompted the letter was Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s decision earlier this year to rescind the Obama-era “Cole memo,” which offered some enforcement guidelines for federal prosecutors when it comes to marijuana laws. Rescinding the guidance led to “uncertainty about banks’ ability to serve this industry without running afoul of federal statutes,” the regulators wrote.

The letter also recognized that this coalition is not alone in its demand for clarity around banking and cannabis policy.

In June, a bipartisan group of 12 governors called on lawmakers to pass the STATES Act, a bill that amends the Controlled Substances Act to create an exemption for state-legal marijuana activity. That bill would effectively protect banks dealing with cannabis businesses.

“Our states have acted with deliberation and care to implement programs through thoughtful and comprehensive legislation and regulations,” the governors wrote. “Our citizens have spoken, we are responding. We ask that Congress recognize and respect our states’ efforts by supporting and passing the STATES Act.”

Confusion in the finance industry over marijuana policy appears to be coming to a head in the United States. As federally backed banking institutions continue to reject clients who deal in the marijuana industry, more businesses are turning to a handful of institutions that are willing to serve cannabis growers, processors and retailers—but the regulators said that’s only a temporary solution.

One example of the consequence of state and federal policy conflicts was recently reported by Marijuana Moment. A candidate running for a Florida agricultural commission seat was told that her Wells Fargo account would be closed after the bank discovered donations from “lobbyists from the medical marijuana industry.”

“A majority of states now have medical marijuana programs and it has become increasingly necessary to craft policy to respond to emerging challenges in this rapidly growing industry,” the new letter from financial regulators concludes. “We must work together to look for solutions rather than avoiding this challenge and ignoring the new policy landscape.”

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

State Financial Regulators Push Congress To Fix Marijuana Banking Problems

Denver Puts a Limit on New Cannabis Businesses

Denver Puts a Limit on New Cannabis Businesses

Greenwood Spring CO - JULY 1: The Green Joint Marijuana Shop and sign in Greenwood Springs in Colorado USA. July 1 2015.

Greenwood Spring CO – JULY 1: The Green Joint Marijuana Shop and sign in Greenwood Springs in Colorado USA. July 1 2015.

Last night, the Denver City Council voted 7-5 in favor of placing a limit on new cannabis businesses’ in Colorado’s cannabis capital.

By this slim vote, the marijuana dream of opening a dispensary in Denver were likely shattered for many hopeful ganjapreneurs. The vote puts an end to Denver’s moratorium on new businesses and will implement a lottery system for new businesses.

There will be no new dispensary licenses handed out and it sounds like the “lottery system for new businesses” will be a very, very limited one if at all.

This decisions means those looking to cash in on Colorado’s green rush must try their hand at gaining licenses in Denver’s neighboring Aurora and Commerce City or look into mountain cities.

The inevitable dispensary plateau has finally hit in Denver.

Bernie Canter

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