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Women Who Use Cannabis Are More Likely To Have Satisfying Orgasms, Study Reveals

Women Who Use Cannabis Are More Likely To Have Satisfying Orgasms, Study Reveals

Women who consume cannabis before sex have better orgasms than those who do not, according to new data.

As the legalization movement continues to expand, more people are coming forward with questions and sharing personal experiences regarding how cannabis affects sex. Cannabis lubes are a hot item now and there are strains of flower said to increase arousal. While there is a plethora of anecdotal evidence out there regarding the ways that cannabis can be used to enhance sexual activity, the scientific research is limited.

One team of researchers exploring the relationship between cannabis and sex aims to contribute clinical findings to demystify how cannabis affects different sexual functions, in women specifically, like sex drive, arousal, orgasm, and overall satisfaction.

Inspired by talking to the patients who come to her practice, Becky K. Lynn, MD, is one of the main designers of the newly published study which determined that consuming cannabis before sexual activity can enhance pleasure and satisfaction with orgasms.

“My interest in this realm came from the many patients that I see in my clinic who have confided in me that using marijuana treats their sexual problems,” Lynn said to Weedmaps.

Aiming to examine how women interpret a sexual experience when cannabis has been consumed before hand, this study analyzes first-hand reports about:

  • Overall sexual satisfaction
  • Sex drive
  • Orgasm
  • Dyspareunia (pain during sex)
  • Lubrication

“I have seen it used in women with chronic pain disorders that lead to painful sex, women who experience difficulty with orgasm or an inability to orgasm, and women who use it to improve their libido, which may not match their partner’s libido,” said Lynn

The Study

According to researchers, the specific goal of this cross-sectional study, titled “The Relationship between Marijuana Use Prior to Sex and Sexual Function in Women,” is to “evaluate women’s perceptions of the effect of marijuana use before sexual activity.”

Published online March 1, 2019 in Sexual Medicine, the data was analyzed and interpreted by:

  • Becky K. Lynn, MD
  • Julia D. Lopez, PhD, MPH, LCSW
  • Collin Miller, MSW
  • Judy Thompson, RN, CCRC
  • E. Cristian Campian, MD, PhD

Spanning an 11 month period from March 2016 to February 2017, the study’s sample group consisted of female patients from one obstetrics and gynecology office. The patients were asked to complete an anonymous sexual health survey during their visit to the doctor’s office.

Once a participant was finished with the questionnaire, she would put it directly into a box secured with a lock, and the data was reviewed at a later time.

The Data

There were 373 women in total who completed the questionnaire during their visit to the doctor over the 11 month period in which the study took place. The demographic information shows that most of the study participants were about the same age, were white and identified as heterosexual.

Upon reviewing the information, the sample group of 373 women was divided into two main groups — non-cannabis users and cannabis users.

There were 197 women in the ‘non-cannabis user’ group (52.8 percent) and 176 women were assigned to the ‘cannabis-user’ group. Being assigned to the ‘cannabis-user’ group did not necessarily mean that she consumed before partaking in sexual activities.

According to the data, 34 percent of the ‘cannabis-users’ (127 women) responded yes to using cannabis before sexual activity, while 13.1 percent (49 women) of the ‘cannabis-users’ did not consume before sex, but did at other times.

Of the 127 women who used cannabis before participating in a sexual activity, 2.13 percent reported that they have more satisfying orgasms than those who did not use cannabis. Participants who reported using cannabis frequently, but not necessarily before sex, were 2.10 times more likely to respond yes to having satisfactory orgasms than those who reportedly used cannabis infrequently.

The study states that “most women reported an increases in sex drive, an improvement in orgasm, a decrease in pain, but no change in lubrication.”


The Findings

According to the study’s authors, there were two main outcomes observed:

  1. “Satisfaction in the sexual domains of drive, orgasm, lubrication, dyspareunia, and overall sexual experience.”
  2. “The effect of the frequency of marijuana use on satisfaction.”

Timing was an important factor with the women who reported using cannabis before sex. The proper timing between cannabis consumption and sex was crucial for a “positive effect on orgasm.”

Contributing clinical examples to what we understand about the relationship between cannabis and sex, this study concludes that cannabis can have a positive impact on a woman’s sex life, and more research should be completed on the topic.

Photo Courtesy of Valeria Boltneva from Pexels

The Feds Want Researchers To Study ‘Minor’ Cannabinoids And Terpenes In Marijuana

The Feds Want Researchers To Study ‘Minor’ Cannabinoids And Terpenes In Marijuana

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)—the marijuana compound known for getting you high—is the most well-know cannabis constituent. In recent years, cannabidiol (CBD) has garnered attention for its non-intoxicating medicinal properties.

Now, the federal government is recruiting researchers to investigate how the dozens of other lesser-known cannabinoids and terpenes work and whether they can treat pain.

It’s going to be a weighty task for any interested parties. There are more than 110 known cannabinoids and 120 terpenes, very few of which have been extensively studied. The federal research project will cover all “minor cannabinoids,” which is defined as anything other than THC, according to a pair of funding notices published by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health this week.

“The mechanisms and processes underlying potential contribution of minor cannabinoids and terpenes to pain relief and functional restoration in patients with different pain conditions may be very broad,” the notices state. “This initiative encourages interdisciplinary collaborations by experts from multiple fields—pharmacologists, chemists, physicists, physiologists, neuroscientists, psychologists, endocrinologists, immunologists, geneticists, behavioral scientists, clinicians, and others in relevant fields of inquiry.”

Numerous studies have established that ingredients in marijuana such as THC and CBD effectively treat various types of pain. There’s also some evidence that other cannabinoids and terpenes contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of cannabis, working synergistically to bolster the plant’s overall benefits—a phenomenon called the “entourage effect.”

But there’s still a lot of work to be done to fully understand the mechanisms through which each cannabinoid and terpene influences pain. If researchers can pinpoint which ingredients are best suited for pain relief, it could inform new therapies. For example, there’s evidence that certain cannabinoids can enhance the pain-relieving effects of opioids, the notice states, so discovering exactly which ones achieve that end can hypothetically help patients take lower doses of addictive painkillers.

“The development or identification of novel pain management strategies is a high priority and unmet need. Natural products have historically been a source of novel analgesic compounds developed into pharmaceuticals (e.g., willow bark to aspirin). A growing body of literature suggests that the cannabis plant may have analgesic properties; however, research into cannabis’s potential analgesic properties has been slow.”

In addition to CBD, the feds say they are particularly interested in research on the following compounds: cannabigerol (CBG), cannabinol (CBN), cannabichromene (CBC), myrcene, ß-caryophyllene, limonene, a-terpineol, linalool, a-phellandrene, a-pinene, ß-pinene, terpinene and a-humulene.

The estimated deadline to submit an application for research funding is March 8, 2019.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

The Feds Want Researchers To Study ‘Minor’ Cannabinoids And Terpenes In Marijuana

Marijuana Research Is Exploding In The Age Of Legalization, New Study Finds

Marijuana Research Is Exploding In The Age Of Legalization, New Study Finds

Researchers are now churning out thousands of studies on marijuana each year. And you can expect that stream of science to keep flowing as more places enact legalization, a new review predicts.

To get a better understanding of how the scientific community has responded to the cannabis reform movement, a team based in Israel used online research databases like PubMed and Web of Science to search for marijuana-related studies from 2000 to 2017.

Research on cannabis has rapidly accelerated in recent years, far outpacing the growth in scientific research as a whole, the new study, which was published this month in the journal Population Health Management, found.

While the overall number of scientific publications per year on PubMed increased 2.5 times during the years in review, the number of publications that examine cannabis increased 4.5 times, from 620 to 2388. The number of studies focused on medical cannabis increased nine times over the same period, from 82 in 2000 to 742 in 2017.

Population Health Management

“The results of the present study demonstrate an ongoing increase in the number of publications related to cannabis in general and to medical cannabis in particular,” the researchers wrote. “The spike in medical publications on medical cannabis that began in 2013 is impressive and encouraging.”

The team went on to categorize each study by medical field.

Population Health Management

Cannabis studies that fell into the neurology realm—which would encompass research looking at how cannabinoids affect conditions like epilepsy, for instance—were the most common and experienced the steadiest growth. Oncological studies on marijuana and cancer were the second most common, followed by psychiatric cannabis studies.

Where are the studies coming from?

Though marijuana remains federally prohibited in the United States, the country also pumps out the most cannabis research globally. Sixty-six percent of the studies under review from 2000 to 2017 originated in the U.S. The second biggest source of marijuana research is Canada, which produced 7.5 percent of the studies in review.

The authors of the new paper noted that cannabis research was stunted following the passage of prohibitionist policies in the 70s. And the recent uptick seems to correspond with state-level legalization efforts.

“The absence of an increase in publications on cannabis until recent years would appear to be related to the United Nations Single Convention that prohibited the use of cannabis for recreational purposes and had broad support in most of the developed countries,” the researchers wrote.

“It is noteworthy that the significant growth in the number of publications on medical cannabis since 2013 parallels legislation permitting the use of recreational cannabis in the states of Washington and Colorado in 2012 and in Alaska and Oregon in 2014, and subsequently in many other countries around the world.”

The team was heartened by the emerging trends in marijuana research, arguing that such a proliferation “should provide data, support, and confidence and should open new horizons for treatment of patients.”

And what’s more, the decision by the new study’s authors to categorize previous science based on medical field “can help direct researchers and policy makers to fields in which data are scant or not available at all,” they wrote.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Marijuana Research Is Exploding In The Age Of Legalization, New Study Finds

Marijuana Licensing Bill Has ‘Negligible’ Fiscal Impacts, Congressional Budget Office Says

Marijuana Licensing Bill Has ‘Negligible’ Fiscal Impacts, Congressional Budget Office Says

marijuana research bill approved by a key U.S. House committee last month would have a “negligible” effect on direct federal spending, according a new analysis from Congress’s official fiscal analyst.

The legislation would force the Department of Justice to begin issuing more licenses to growers of cannabis to be used in scientific research, an issue that has been a contentious one between the Trump administration and members of Congress, including Republicans.

But its fiscal impact would be slim, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) said in a two-page cost estimate released on Wednesday.

In the closing months of the Obama administration, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) created a process to expand on the sole approved cultivator that has had a monopoly on the U.S. supply of marijuana for studies for half a century. But under Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the Justice Department has refused to act on the more than two dozen applications filed through the new program by would-be legal growers.

The situation has led to a series of bipartisan sign-on letters and testy lines of questioning for Sessions during oversight hearings in both the House and Senate, culminating in the passage of the bill last month by the House Judiciary Committee to force the attorney general’s hand by requiring more licenses on a certain timetable.

The long-term projection is that “enacting the legislation would not increase net direct spending or on budget deficits in any of the four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2029,” CBO wrote in the new cost estimate about the bill.

Sponsored by Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), the proposal hasn’t yet been scheduled for a floor vote. But while CBO is required to evaluate all bills approved by most congressional committees, the score’s release is a reminder that it’s being taken more seriously than most of the hundreds of other pieces of cannabis-focused legislation that have been filed on Capitol Hill over the years.

“CBO estimates that only a few new manufacturers would be registered each year,” the office reasoned, citing unspecified “information” from the Department of Justice.

Another provision of the bill would direct DEA to work with the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Food and Drug Administration to issue recommendations for good manufacturing practices for growing marijuana.

“The administrative costs associated with publishing such recommendations within 6 months of enactment would be less than $500,000 over the 2019-2023 period,” CBO found.

A third section would authorize the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to refer military veterans to participate in clinical trials on marijuana’s potential medical benefits and encourage VA itself to conduct research on cannabis, two activities for which the department currently has authority but has been reluctant to pursue without more clear direction from Congress.

“Because VA already has those authorities under current law, CBO estimates that implementing this section would have insignificant costs,” the office’s report says.

The low-cost findings are similar to a previous memo the office released after separate legislation to encourage VA to study medical cannabis became the first standalone marijuana reform bill ever approved by a congressional committee earlier this year when it was reported out favorably by the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee.

In that case, CBO determined that the bill would “cost less than $500,000 over the 2019-2023 period, primarily to prepare and submit the necessary reports to the Congress” regarding updates on VA’s involvement in cannabis research.

The broader Gaetz legislation on research and cultivation licensing that the Judiciary Committee approved last month is only the second cannabis-focused bill to have cleared a congressional panel.

If enacted, “DOJ would collect registration fees of about $3,000 annually from each registrant,” CBO wrote in its new analysis. “Such fees are treated in the budget as reductions in direct spending, and DOJ is authorized to spend them without further appropriation.”

As a result, CBO also found that the bill would not “would not affect revenues” appreciably.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Marijuana Licensing Bill Has ‘Negligible’ Fiscal Impacts, Congressional Budget Office Says

Scientists Discover You Can Use Espresso Machines To Make Marijuana Extracts

Scientists Discover You Can Use Espresso Machines To Make Marijuana Extracts

A lot of time and money goes into marijuana research. But what if I told you that you could take a nug of weed, place it in an espresso machine and extract cannabis ingredients in under one minute?

OK, that’s an oversimplified description. Still, it’s more or less what a team of researchers was able to accomplish in a recent experiment detailed in a manuscript due to be published in The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry.

Via The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry.

The team wanted to test whether espresso-based extraction—a novel and relatively inexpensive analytic method, raved about in scientific literature—could be applied to marijuana. And it turns out that it can!

You don’t need a fancy, $2,000 setup, either. For the experiment, the researchers used a Nespresso Essenza Manual XN2003 machine, which goes for about $300 on eBay. (It’s not currently available on Amazon, though—possibly because they’ve all been snatched up by the chemist community).

Via Amazon.

“The use of hard cap espresso machines has been recently proposed for analytical extractions due to its easy use, speed, availability and low price, providing efficient extraction of organic compounds from solid samples in few seconds,” the researchers wrote.

Seized cannabis provided by Unidad de Inspección de Farmacia y Control de Drogas del Área de Sanidad in Valencia, Spain, was inserted into the filter after a thorough cleaning. The hard cap espresso machine was used to extract three main ingredients from the plant (THC, CBD and CBN).

Then the results of those extracts were cross-referenced with extractions of the same sample using three different, more traditional methods: Ultrasound-assisted extraction, gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).

And consistent with results from non-marijuana-related studies, the extraction method seemed to work—in under one minute.

“It has been evidenced that the developed method for the major cannabinoids extraction is a really encouraging example of the wide range of possibilities that a conventional and low cost hard cap espresso assisted extraction could offer in analytical laboratories,” according to the study.

“The quantitative extraction of THC, CBD and CBN from buds, leaves and stems has been achieved in a single and fast extraction of 40 seconds.”

The researchers noted that after using a rigorous multi-step cleaning method, the coffee machine has been “used in our laboratory during the last two and a half years without observing any damage or incident.”

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Scientists Discover You Can Use Espresso Machines To Make Marijuana Extracts

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