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Watch Jay Leno Drive and Beat a Hemp Car

Watch Jay Leno Drive and Beat a Hemp Car

If you heard that Jay Leno was driving a cannabis car, you may imagine something like the van from Dumb and Dumber, affixed in plant leaves. However, the truth is that the vehicle in question is a 2017 Revival. The 2017 Revival appears identical to any smoothly curved, fast-running auto of its type. There are no hastily assembled leaves or coiled hemp ropes eclectically fastened on the body of the automobile. Rather, the cannabis in question is a plastics-like product fashioned from woven hemp.

Millions of fibers of industrial hemp, cannabis sativa plants which contain only trace amounts of the psychoactive cannabinoid THC, create the elegant plastics design. Recently, former Dell executive Bruce Dietzen introduced and sold Jay Leno on the vehicle in a CNBC segment. The two went through a rigorous testing process while Dietzen described the sporty car. While Dietzen’s idea was innovative, a famous American Industrialist inspired Dietzen. According to CNBC’s piece on the cannabis car,

“Henry Ford manufactured the original hemp car all the way back in 1941. The father of the Model T was an advocate for both producing and fueling cars entirely with plant material.”

Ford advocated using plant-based materials as sources of fuel and structure long before notions of climate change entered the picture. Based on reports, Dietzen crafted “the world’s greenest automobile, a car made of hemp.” While taking the 2017 Revival for a spin, Dietzen gave a nod to Henry Ford, then explained the benefits of the alternative vehicle. As the CNBC broadcast revealed, the average car produces 10 tons of air pollutants. In contrast, the 2017 Revival is a carbon-neutral vehicle that emits no air pollutants. On paper, the 2017 Revival is the top of its class.

jay-leno-hemp-car(CNBC photo)

 

Naturally, Leno cruised at high speeds and the engine’s horsepower paralleled that of a standard sports car. While driving, Leno wondered whether the vehicle will produce clouds of marijuana smoke if involved in a fiery crash. Dietzen informed him that the car’s structure had no connection with psychoactive cannabis, aside from its composition.

Following that, Leno questioned the vehicle’s durability. First, Dietzen pounded on the hood of the Revival, demonstrating its strength. Leno followed suit and began clapping the car with some resounding blows. As it turns out, the hemp-based body sculpting material is ten times stronger than fiberglass, according to the information released in the CNBC report. One witnesses the strength by watching the two grown men fail to produce any impact upon the hood of the vehicle. Needless to say, Leno bought the car.

jay-leno-hemp-car(CNBC photo)

 

With such a fascinating car on the market, one’s curiosity arises regarding the price tag. The 2017 Revival runs in at $40,000 with the standard model. Leno’s customized car cost $200,000. In terms of the future of the vehicle, the retired Dell executive has a unique marketing plan. He’s looking at reaching the younger generation that’s concerned with their carbon footprint and able to splurge on an automobile that’s the first of its kind. He plans to target young, entrepreneurial types who see the value of the car and a healthier lifestyle.

Dietzen is reported to be less interested in profiteering and seeks to promote an innovation he believes in. He remarked, “‘I’m not going to go out there and get a bunch of people for financing who want to make quarterly numbers, because that’s a good way to sink a company. I’m doing it out of my belief in what needs to be done.'” In other words, Dietzen created the Revival for like-minded individuals who have the future in mind. The car is for the consumers, rather than the shareholders or investors. Or, one could say that the vehicle is ideal for those who want to invest in the planet.

 

 

Fewer Car Searches Ordered Since Legalization

Fewer Car Searches Ordered Since Legalization

Cannabis Legalization means police are searching fewer cars. A new study from Stanford University shows that in states where cannabis has been legalized, the number of traffic stops has decreased. The study is as much about the effects of cannabis legalization as it is about the racial profiling that fuels traffic stops, both of which play key roles on opposing sides of the war on drugs.

The Stanford Open Policing Project collects data from traffic stops from law enforcement agencies nationwide. According to the project’s website:

“Our goal is to help researchers, journalists, and policymakers investigate and improve interactions between police and the public.”

In examining data from Washington and Colorado, there were over 50 percent fewer traffic stops across all ethnicities in both states. But the African American and Hispanic populations are still being pulled over at higher rates, sometimes three times more frequently compared to Caucasian drivers. Statistics were based on traffic stops that did not result in an arrest, and were gathered from state law enforcement agencies, as opposed to local municipal police forces.

car-searches-decrease-since-legalization

In states that had not legalized cannabis, no such drop was seen in the number of traffic stops, but the racial differences were evident in 12 states that the project was able to track.

Traffic stops are one of the most common interactions the public has with law enforcement, but for many it’s a gateway into a system where racism flourishes. Racial profiling is still alive and well in local jurisdictions across the country, which feeds into a judicial system that disproportionately penalizes ethnic minorities for nonviolent drug crimes. The roots of the drug war reflect these statistics, which sought to marginalize groups that were deemed a threat to the political establishment.

While legalizing cannabis for the purposes of reducing traffic stops may be far down on the list of priorities for cannabis advocates and civil rights experts, improving the public’s trust in law enforcement is crucial. The testimony of Officer Jeronimo Yanez last week, who shot Philando Castile during a traffic stop because he smelled “burnt marijuana,” is another signal showing law enforcement is not yet fully equipped to differentiate a violent criminal from a person in possession of cannabis. Castile was shot in his home state of North Carolina, where cannabis has been decriminalized. But his death indicates how law enforcement still treats those in possession of a substance as a threat to their personal safety. While legalization may change the outcome of sentencing and reduce the number of those incarcerated for minor drug crimes, it cannot change police policy nor the sentiment of law enforcement overnight.

Limiting interactions between law enforcement and cannabis users could save lives, in the absence of true reform that would hold law enforcement accountable for racial profiling and unjust killings. As states continue to develop their own policies regarding cannabis, the Stanford project shows that lives could be saved indirectly by ending prohibition. With no help from the Justice Department in regards to federal law enforcement oversight or drug reform, progress will continue state-by-state.

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