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Lesser-Known Marijuana Votes You Might Have Missed On Election Day

Lesser-Known Marijuana Votes You Might Have Missed On Election Day

For good reason, there was a lot of excitement among marijuana reform advocates after Tuesday’s election. Three states passed measures legalizing cannabis for medical or adult use, after all. But there were also a few smaller cannabis-related measures on state and local ballots that haven’t received quite as much attention.

Here’s what you might have missed:

In Colorado, a measure to change the definition of industrial hemp under the state constitution passed, 61-39 percent. There were some concerns that, should the federal government legalize hemp—as it seems poised to do—the state’s existing definition would be inconsistent with the federal definition, which could put Colorado hemp farmers at a disadvantage. Now Colorado’s definition will have the “same meaning as it is defined in federal law or as the term is defined in Colorado statute.”

Almost 90 percent of voters in Chicago said they want tax revenue from perhaps soon-to-be-legal cannabis sales to go toward public schools in the city and mental health services. The question was advisory in nature, so it won’t actually change the law—but it does signal that people have strong feelings about where marijuana tax revenue should go.

Los Angeles voters rejected a measure that would have established a public bank in the city, 58-42 percent. The measure was designed to mitigate some of the difficulties that cannabis businesses face when dealing with traditional financial institutions, as well as provide financing for affordable housing initiatives.

And more than 90 cities and counties across California voted on measures to change the way that marijuana is taxed, licensed and regulated in their jurisdictions. For example, voters in Malibu, California, approved a measure that allows cannabis delivery services and impose a new tax on gross receipts for non-medical marijuana sales.

https://massroots.wpengine.com/news/marijuana-got-votes-politicians-midterms/

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Lesser-Known Marijuana Votes You Might Have Missed On Election Day

Illinois’ First Medical Cannabis Sales Expected in Two Weeks

Illinois’ First Medical Cannabis Sales Expected in Two Weeks

In 2013, Illinois joined the ranks of states throughout the US where the medicinal use of cannabis is legal, and after a two year delay, approved patients may finally have safe, reliable access to medicine before the end of the year. Illinois medical cannabis program officials have announced, to the relief of many patients and families, that for the first time in the state’s history, legal medical sales are expected to begin in the next two weeks.

Final approval has only been given to four dispensaries in the metro Chicago area, but several more are expected to be licensed in the near future. The program’s director, Joseph Wright stated,

“A total of approximately 12 to 15 dispensaries should be registered by the end of November. Eight or 9 of those will be located in the Chicagoland area.”

Anticipating the first day of legal sales, some Illinois-grown cannabis has reportedly already been processed and packaged, but dispensaries are not permitted to sell anything until they have access to the state’s medical cannabis database. Access to the database is required in order for dispensaries to be able to verify each patients’ information and program approval status. Once access is granted, at least a few dispensaries will be ready to begin sales immediately.

Many of the medical cannabis patients in Illinois are expected to be inexperienced when it comes to using the plant, and because cannabis affects every person differently, many may have to go through a trial-and-error period before finding the best strains, amounts and methods of consumption to treat their condition. In an effort to reduce the trial-and-error period for patients and to share important information, one medical cannabis company in Illinois — Cresco Labs — has launched a $1 million campaign to help educate patients and non-patients alike.

While excitement levels are at an all-time high for medical cannabis patients and activists, there is also a darker underlying issue to be faced in Illinois. By the time medical cannabis is legally available for purchase, Illinois will be about halfway through the initial four-year pilot program. If Gov. Bruce Rauner does not reauthorize the Illinois cannabis program in 2017, it will expire and cease to exist. Earlier this year, Gov. Rauner vetoed expanding the program to include 11 more conditions.

Chicago’s Thanksgiving Parade To Feature Marijuana Float

Chicago’s Thanksgiving Parade To Feature Marijuana Float

Chicago’s 81st annual Thanksgiving Parade will be featuring an unusual addition to their lineup this year; a medical marijuana float. The parade which, is now call the McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, features marching bands, performance groups and even Santa himself.

Illinois recently passed legislature allowing medical marijuana, and has already approved 6 dispensary locations in the city. Now one of those dispensaries, Good Intentions, will be proudly marching proudly down State Street in downtown Chicago.

The float will have a live garden of onion grass and flowers, no marijuana this time. Store owner Tammy Jacobi said, “Just as plants grow and flower, the company has blossomed into an organization that provides hope for the most seriously ill citizens of Illinois.”

The company is keeping the float PG rated and doesn’t anticipate negative reactions. Jacobi said, “We’re hoping that parents take the time to explain what medical marijuana is to their children and enlighten a younger generation of the benefits of emerging science and compassion.”

via: DNA Info

Chicago Approves 6 Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

Chicago Approves 6 Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

On Friday, Chicago Zoning Board members sat down to decide on the fate of 13 medical marijuana dispensary applicants. Of the 13 applicants, 6 were were approved, 6 were delayed, and 1 was rejected.

Applicants gave their financial plans and addressed security concerns to establish credibility for their dispensaries. Staffing, security, financing, and labeling were all considered when awarding licenses to prospective dispensaries, along with $500,000 in capital to get the ball rolling.

Tami Marron’s dispensary application was rejected because her marijuana business planned to allow patients to apply for their medical licenses at her shop. Board members expressed concerns about the Wicker Park location, apparently leery of self-interested dispensaries handing out medical marijuana cards. City spokesman Pete Strazzabosco said that Marron’s dispensary offered an, “Interior configuration issue that would have an adverse impact on the public way and patient environment.”

In addition dispensary licenses, one grow operation was approved to start growing in the Hegewisch neighborhood on the Far Southeast Side of Chicago. Although zoning boards are closely scrutinizing prospective business owners, it seems that medical marijuana will soon be available to Chicago patients.

Photo Credit: iceman9294

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