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Toddler Finds Relief With Cannabis Salve

Toddler Finds Relief With Cannabis Salve

The use of topical cannabis products to treat symptoms of psoriasis and arthritis, or to help reduce localized pain and inflammation is a relatively new concept in modern medicine. Those among the medical cannabis community will not be surprised to learn, however, that a homemade cannabis salve is currently providing relief to a toddler suffering in Nevada when doctors and pharmaceuticals could not.

When Carter Grey Padelford entered the world on November 26, 2016, he did not look like most newborn babies. Carter’s skin was bright red, and pulled so tight that it was impossible for his eyelids to close all the way. “He was very…almost swollen,” said Shai Sifford, Carter’s mother. “Bright red–like fire engine red. And his skin was just extremely, extremely tight.”

These symptoms are caused by a rare skin disorder called lamellar ichthyosis. Affecting only one out of every 100,000 babies born in the United States, few doctors are familiar with lamellar ichthyosis, and even fewer understand how to treat the symptoms. “Doctors didn’t offer us much advice or help. I feel they neglected us because they didn’t know what was going on,” Shai said. “They told me to keep him covered and to avoid baths and to come back in two years when he was two.”

What is lamellar ichthyosis?

toddler cannabis

Affecting the skin, lamellar ichthyosis is a genetic condition that displays slightly different symptoms depending on the person. In Carter’s case, it causes his skin to grow up to 14 times faster than normal. His body cannot keep up with shedding the dead skin cells at that rate. As a result, the dead skin cells build up into dry, itchy, and painful scales which cause his skin to be pulled so tightly that it limits his mobility and causes bloody sores. His parents have to give him multiple oatmeal baths each day to moisturize his skin and scrub the scales off. As he grows rapidly, like toddlers do, this is overwhelming for Carter and his parents.

Very little is known about this rare genetic disorder, and Carter’s parents were desperate to do anything to help their little boy live a normal life. Posting about Carter’s experience on popular social media sites brought them a tip from a helpful stranger who found relief using cannabis infused shampoo.

Topical Cannabis to Treat Lamellar Ichthyosis Symptoms

marijuana salve

Lucky to be living in Nevada, a state where marijuana is legal for both medical and recreational use, Carter’s grandmother learned how to make a salve at home using cannabis oil and other essential oils. Now, Shai covers him in the topical cannabis from head to toe multiple times each day, and it has produced dramatic results. “His progress has been insane,” Shai posted on social media. “His eyes could never really close completely, but since I’ve been using the cannabis oil on his eyelids, they are almost closing all the way.”

Like in the brain, immune system, and nervous system, endocannabinoid receptors are also found in skin cells. The cannabinoids in cannabis, like CBD, bind directly to those receptors in the skin when applied topically, delivering help directly where it is most needed. The psychoactive properties of cannabis are not translated through topical application, so Carter is not getting high or experiencing any negative side effects from this treatment method. It is simply helping his body work to heal itself naturally.

Carter’s parents understand that many people in the United States are not yet aware of the medical efficacy of cannabis. “I know there is a lot of controversy about cannabis use with kids, and I’m sure I’ll receive some backlash for choosing this method,” Shai said. “But cannabis has been literally changing his life, and I’m so excited I could burst.”

Photos courtesy of: KTNV Nevada

A Nevada Family Sees the Positive Impacts of Medical Marijuana on Their Child

A Nevada Family Sees the Positive Impacts of Medical Marijuana on Their Child

Tyler Richard, a 14 year old from Nevada, spent the first 13 years of his life dealing with symptoms from his autism and epilepsy.

Going through thousands of seizures every week, some of which were small and some led to his mother, Toni Richard, having to personally give him CPR before calling 911. The dozen medications that he was prescribed were unable to control the negative effects his illnesses had on him.

With the lack of sleep caused by his seizures, Tyler had constant outbursts and dark circles under his eyes. Toni Richard, a teacher at truckee Meadows COmmunity College, spoke about what it was like with Tyler never being able to really sleep:

“In 13 years he maybe slept through the night 50 times. It was like having a newborn forever.”

tyler richardToni and Tyler Richard. (Photo: Siobhan McAndrew)

Living in fear that Tyler might run away from the home at night, Toni became accustomed to locking the picket fence surrounding their home, and sometimes she stayed up all night making sure Tyler wouldn’t hurt himself.  On occasion, Toni reported that she would even rent a hotel room for a night, having Tyler sleep in the bed while she slept in the hallway hoping for a few peaceful hours of rest.

As his seizures continued to worsen, including causing the right side of his face to go into paralysis and sag, Toni got scared and was looking for a way to help her son.

In 2014, the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center suggested medical marijuana to help Tyler with his seizures and to help him sleep. After hearing about multiple instances where it has helped children, Toni thought it could be beneficial for her son. She told the Reno Gazette Journal,

“The first night we tried it he slept through the night.”

With the help of cannabis oil, Tyler has slept much better, has fewer outbursts and is doing better in school.

The issue Toni has had throughout this process hasn’t been with cannabis directly, but in the manner that she is forced to learn, all on her own, about the best ways to treat her son. Whether it is the appropriate dosage, where to purchase it, or what strain to buy, she has been on her own.

Krista Colletti, a Nevada pediatrician, shared their opinions on medical marijuana during the Nevada disability Conference in July:

“It is a medication we need to know more about,”

Colletti pointed out that families often times are forced to travel to seek advice from specialists on the topic and must deal with issues of federal law if they must resort to bringing cannabis back over state lines to get the proper type and amount.

With the success that children such as Tyler have had with medical marijuana, it seems that it will become a more popular choice for parents trying to help their kids.

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