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David Irving Quits the NFL While Smoking a Fat Joint On Instagram Live

David Irving Quits the NFL While Smoking a Fat Joint On Instagram Live

While smoking a joint and streaming live on Instagram Thursday night, David Irving, defensive lineman for the Dallas Cowboys, announced that he is quitting his job with the National Football League (NFL).

“Basically, guys, I quit. I know they’re talking about a suspension and all this other nonsense. I’m out of there. I’m not doing this sh** no more,” Irving said during the video stream on Instagram Live.

Irving completed the live stream in response to being suspended indefinitely by the Cowboys after his urine tested positive for the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite again. This is the third time he has been suspended in four years for failing to abide by the league’s outdated drug policy.

“Everyone questions my commitment to football,” he said. “But let’s it straight…I love football…However, I don’t love the NFL. The NFL isn’t football.”

Like many others, Irving has expressed many times that he believes NFL players should be permitted to medicate and treat injuries with cannabis instead of opioids if they choose. He supports the #plantsoverpills movement with the hashtag proudly displayed at the top of his Instagram page. He also repeated the statement multiple times during the nearly 20 minute Instagram Live video stream.

One thing was made clear during the stream: Irving thinks it’s bullsh**.

“We got this opioid thing going on and I’m prescribed all that bullsh**, and I just think it’s bullsh** that we’ve got to deal with that policy,” he said during the Instagram Live stream. “Everyone thinks it’s about smoking weed. It’s not about smoking weed. It’s much bigger than that. Much, much bigger. Hell, I have concussions every day. I get to see around the office how that f—s your head up and I feel it.”

“How many NBA players you see getting in trouble about this? How many coaches you see get in trouble about this? How many baseball players get in trouble? How many UFC players getting in trouble? How many actors? Not many, but you do see us football players,” Irving said.

While some are saying that Irving is quitting the NFL solely because of it’s cannabis policy, he insists that is not the only reason.

“If I’m going to be addicted to something, I’d rather it be marijuana, which is medical,” Irving continued. “I do not consider it a drug, rather than the Xanax bars or the hydro[codone] or the Seroquel and all that crazy sh** that they feed you. Like I said, it ain’t about smoking weed.”

While his point is valid and worth noting, some criticize the way Irving went about delivering the message. It is possible that it could have been more well received by a larger audience if he had expressed his views in a different manner.

Irving has joined the ranks of so many other NFL players, both active and retired, who have spoken out in support of using cannabis to treat symptoms caused by injuries sustained during games, like concussions, muscle tears, and broken bones.

NFL players can only be drug tested from April through August. If a player does not fail his drug test the first time, it will be another year before he can be tested again. This is how some players are able to medicate with cannabis during the season, assuming they are able to pass the drug test the first time.

At only 25 years old, Irving was a promising player in the NFL when he was able to stay on the field. He made four tackles and one sack in the only two games he played for the Cowboys during the most recent season. The season before that, Irving sacked the quarterback seven times in eight games. He was about to become a free agent, but apparently he no longer has any interest in exploring his options with the NFL.
What will Irving do next if he isn’t going to play football? He says he has big plans for the future, and that they will be revealed soon enough. Perhaps Irving will follow in the footsteps of other ex-professional-athletes like Tiki Barber and Ricky Williams by launching his own cannabis brand or investing in an existing cannabis business.

Dallas Cowboys Owner Pushes to End Marijuana Prohibition in the NFL

Dallas Cowboys Owner Pushes to End Marijuana Prohibition in the NFL

Last week during the NFL’s Annual League Meeting in Phoenix, the 32 team owners held a private meeting to discuss things like Commissioner Roger Goodell’s future contract and succession planning, the practice of investigating off-field misconduct, and the NFL’s position on cannabis. One in particular, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, was extremely vocal in his support for dropping the prohibition of marijuana use in the league.

According to Pro Football Talk’s Mike Florio, Jones would like the league to stop disciplining players who test positive for cannabis usage. Deciding to remove the ban on marijuana, which is currently banned under the league’s substance abuse policy, isn’t quite that easy though. Neither the owners, nor the NFL can make this decision without incorporating the process into the future collective bargaining talks.

Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys. (Pro Football Spot photo)

While these talks will most likely not occur until the current NFL and NFLPA collective bargaining agreement expires in 2020, the support from one of the league’s most powerful owners is a giant step forward. Jones, having had three Dallas Cowboy defenders suspended in the past due to violating the league’s substance abuse policy, is no stranger to the NFL’s strict stance on cannabis. Currently, the NFL’s threshold for a positive marijuana test is 35 nanograms per milliliter, the strictest out of the four major sports.

  • MLB – 50 nanograms per milliliter
  • NBA – In the NBA, urine samples are submitted to the World Anti-Doping Agency, according to the collective-bargaining agreement, and WADA has a threshold of 150 ng/ml.
  • NHL – Cannabis is not restricted or tested.

While the NFL’s testing procedure for marijuana may still be the strictest, the league has reduced the penalties for positive tests. Multiple failed tests however, can still get you banned from ever playing in the league again. Because of this, many players and cannabis advocates see the current standards and restrictions as unfair and potentially dangerous. As it turns out, science may very well be on Jones’s and the players’ side.

Recreational cannabis use is currently legal in eight U.S. States, as well as the District of Columbia. In 20 additional states, medical marijuana use is permitted. Under the current collective bargaining agreement, NFL players are banned from using cannabis under any circumstances, including medical treatment. The long-term use of drugs with highly addictive properties, like the opiates prescribed for common aches and pains suffered by many professional football players, put them at serious risk of drug dependency, overdose, and potentially even death.

Because of this, many former NFL players have been vocal in criticizing the substance abuse policy. In an interview with Deadspin regarding the widespread use of opiates in the league, former NFL offensive tackle Eugene Monroe said this:

“There’s a stigma associated with cannabis. But I think that stigma is loosened and removed as people become educated that cannabis really has medical value. It has real applications, and I believe that application can also be included in sports.”

Cannabis has been shown to be extremely effective at treating the symptoms of chronic pain. The National Academies of Sciences, Medicine and Engineering published an extensive literature review earlier this year showing “substantial evidence that cannabis is an effective treatment for chronic pain in adults.”

For Jerry Jones and many others, bringing up the issue of removing cannabis from the list of banned substances in the NFL could not have come at a better time. While understanding that a more lenient drug policy will mean concessions on the part of the NFLPA, an initial dialogue is an important step.

“We sent the union last spring, several pages or lists of issues that we wanted to address,” Goodell said in February. “As the league and as ownership and I expect – and we put on that list drug policy as one of those issues – so we would love to engage, but I think what we’re seeing is a reason why we should all sit down and get at the table, begin negotiations so that if we want to reach a different policy on either the drug policy or any other matter, we can all begin that earlier and do it in a way that’s responsible.”

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