Read Rep. Earl Blumenauer’s Marijuana Memo To Democrats On 2019 Legalization

Read Rep. Earl Blumenauer’s Marijuana Memo To Democrats On 2019 Legalization

On Wednesday, Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) issued a memo to his party’s leadership laying out a step-by-step process for how they can pass marijuana legislation in 2019 should they control one or both chambers of Congress.

Read the full memo below:

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See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Read Rep. Earl Blumenauer’s Marijuana Memo To Democrats On 2019 Legalization

Democrats And Republicans Clash Over Which Party Will Lead On Marijuana In 2019

Democrats And Republicans Clash Over Which Party Will Lead On Marijuana In 2019

Which party is going to take a leadership role in advancing marijuana reform after the midterm elections? It depends on who you ask.

On Thursday, both Reps. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) indicated that their respective party would be backing legislation to change federal cannabis laws in the months after November’s critical election. Rohrabacher said that he’d received assurances that the White House would support reform efforts during the 116th Congress, which begins in January.

“It could be as early as spring of 2019, but definitely in the next legislative session,” he said, noting that President Donald Trump planned to keep his promise to support a bipartisan bill to protect legal states from federal interference.

Later, Blumenauer—a close colleague of the Republican congressman when it comes to cannabis reform efforts—said that Democrats would promote legislation to change cannabis laws in the first half of 2019 if his party retakes the House.

“With Democrats in control, we will be able to have the legislative process work and we’ll see more progress in a relatively short order, I think.”

“These will be some of the easiest things to do in the first six months of a new Congress because they’re supported by the public, the legislation is already teed up and ready to go,” Blumenauer said in an interview with Bloomberg. “It’s one of these areas of progress that will show we can get our act together and move forward.”

“It doesn’t have to be the top priority. It’s simpler than health care or global warming. And it’s supported by the public. I think it’s a no-brainer. I think it moves in the next six months.”

Watch the full interview here:

Blumenauer seems to be breaking somewhat from his party’s leadership. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-MD), for example, said last month that top Democrats haven’t yet “talked about” promoting federal marijuana legislation if the party retakes the House in the midterm elections. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) also suggested that the fate of federal cannabis reform would depend, in part, on the will of the president.

“I don’t know where the president is on any of this,” Pelosi said. “So any decision about how we go forward would have to reflect where we can get the result.”

Trump Plans To Back Legal Medical Marijuana After Midterms, GOP Congressman Says

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Democrats And Republicans Clash Over Which Party Will Lead On Marijuana In 2019

More State Political Parties Endorse Marijuana Legalization

More State Political Parties Endorse Marijuana Legalization

Delegates at Democratic party conventions in two separate states voted to add marijuana legalization planks to their official platforms this weekend.

In Texas, Democrats embraced a policy to “legalize possession and use of marijuana and its derivatives and to regulate its use, production and sale as is successfully done in Colorado, Washington and other States.” Delegates also called on the immediate legalization of medical marijuana, the removal of cannabis from the list of federally banned substances and the release of individuals convicted of marijuana possession, as well as the expungement of records for individuals convicted of marijuana-related misdemeanors.

A separate plank adopted by the party embraces the “legalization of hemp for agricultural purposes.”

The language of the planks is similar to the Texas Democratic Party’s current platform, which also called for marijuana decriminalization and the regulation of the “use, cultivation, production, and sale [of cannabis] as is done with tobacco and alcohol.”

The move comes about a week after the state’s Republican party delegates approved platform planks to decriminalize cannabis, expand the state’s medical marijuana program, reschedule marijuana under federal law and push forward with hemp reform.

In New Hampshire, Democratic delegates also voted in favor of adding a platform plank to legalize cannabis. “We believe that marijuana should be legalized, taxed, and regulated,” the Granite State Dems’ new plank reads. Delegates at the convention also approved a resolutionsupporting the removal of marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act.

The passage of the pro-legalization plank in New Hampshire reflects a significant policy evolution—but the path to its approval wasn’t necessarily smooth. There was debate among party officials about the initial language of the plank, which said the state should “treat cannabis in a manner similar to alcohol.” The plank was changed to satisfy some members who took issue with the reference to alcohol, The Concord Monitor reported. Even so, not all members were on board with the plank, with House Minority Leader Steve Shurtleff arguing that the party should wait until a legislative commission studying the impact of legalization in the state submits its report in November.

That the party’s delegates went ahead and adopted the legal marijuana endorsement is “an encouraging development that bodes very well for the future of cannabis policy in New Hampshire,” Matt Simon, New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project, told Marijuana Moment. “After several years of modest, incremental reforms being obstructed by previous Democratic Governors John Lynch and Maggie Hassan, it’s great to see that the party, and both of its gubernatorial candidates, are now embracing legalization and regulation.”

New Hampshire’s Republican party has not taken up legalization as a platform plank.

The Texas and New Hampshire Dems joined the ranks of several others that approved similar platform positions.

In May, the Democratic Party of New York endorsed a resolution supporting “the legalization of marijuana which should be regulated and taxed in a manner similar to alcohol.” Connecticut’s Democratic party also adopted a platform plank this year stating that “[t]he time for legalization of Marijuana has come.”

“Doing so will raise revenue, which can be used to benefit those suffering from the disease of addiction to prescription pain medications and other opioids.”

And from California to Wisconsin, Democratic party delegates across the country officially backed marijuana legalization in 2016—and numerous others threw their support behind more modest cannabis reform policies such as decriminalization. Iowa’s Democratic party went even further, calling for the legalization of all drugs.

That same year, the Democratic National Convention (DNC) approved the first-ever major party platform to include a plank embracing a “reasoned pathway for future legalization” and the rescheduling of cannabis under federal law.

“We believe that the states should be laboratories of democracy on the issue of marijuana, and those states that want to decriminalize it or provide access to medical marijuana should be able to do so. We support policies that will allow more research on marijuana, as well as reforming our laws to allow legal marijuana businesses to exist without uncertainty. And we recognize our current marijuana laws have had an unacceptable disparate impact in terms of arrest rates for African Americans that far outstrip arrest rates for whites, despite similar usage rates.”

The growing support for legalization among Democratic state parties appears to reflect a similar trend in public opinion toward cannabis reform nationally. A recent poll found that a record 68 percent of Americans believe marijuana should be legal. That includes a majority of Republicans. While federal lawmakers have generally been slower to adopt pro-legalization stances, a number of bipartisan bills have also been introduced in recent months that aim to reform the country’s cannabis laws.

https://massroots.wpengine.com/news/support-marijuana-legalization-record-high-new-survey-shows/

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

More State Political Parties Endorse Marijuana Legalization

Republican Rule Change Allows Marijuana Use By Judge Nominees

Republican Rule Change Allows Marijuana Use By Judge Nominees

For the past several decades, the U.S. Senate has blocked judicial nominees who have used marijuana after taking the bar exam from being confirmed. But now, under a rule change made quietly by Republicans, those restrictions are being scaled back. And Democrats, who say they have no problem in principle with the move, are criticizing their GOP counterparts for reducing judicial cannabis discrimination only now that Republicans control the Senate and the White House.

“Since at least the Clinton administration, Judiciary Committee Republicans did not clear background investigations of judicial nominees who reported to the FBI that they had ever used marijuana after taking the bar exam,” Democrats on the Judiciary Committee wrote in a new report. “Because of this Republican policy, a number of judicial nominees were either blocked or never nominated in the first place.”

But under a new policy enacted by Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA), candidates to be judges can have consumed marijuana up to two times after taking the bar exam if the use was at least five years prior to the date of their nomination to the federal bench.

“While Democrats did not object to the policy change on the merits,” the minority party’s new report says, “Republicans only made this change because of a political change to Republican control of the presidency and Senate.”

The move was the subject of a debate during a Judiciary Committee meeting last November.

“Over time, there’s been an evolving attitude in our society towards marijuana,” Grassley said at the time, defending the rule change. “And I suppose as I’ve looked at it over a period of time in which I’ve had this absolute prohibition attitude that I’ve demonstrated maybe not in public but in private about it, I’ve come to the conclusion that sometime down the road — and we may be down the road there now — that we, if [marijuana use is] the sole judgement of whether somebody ought to have a judgeship or not, or maybe any other position, we may not be able to find people to fill those positions.”

Democrats argued that the timing of the change seemed too convenient for Republicans.

“I know of some who would have been top-notch federal judges [and] were disqualified and stopped by Republican senators,” Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) said, referring to Obama-era nominees. “I am not opposed to a different standard, but we should not have a double standard for nominees who are presented under a Democratic president and nominees that are presented under a Republican president. And we need to be transparent about what we are doing and why we are doing it.”

Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) agreed, saying, “There’s seems to be one standard with a Republican administration [and] a different one with a Democratic administration. It’s tougher on the Democrats. I’m just saying, let’s have one standard. It may evolve.”

Democrats included their complaints about the marijuana use rule change as part of a larger 61-page report they issued on Thursday criticizing what they see as Republican efforts to “stack” federal courts.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Republican Rule Change Allows Marijuana Use By Judge Nominees

Democratic Group Sees Political Value In Marijuana

Democratic Group Sees Political Value In Marijuana

The head of a top Democratic-affiliated political organization says that the party can use marijuana to its political advantage.

“I don’t think there’s any question that in the places where we’ve seen legalization on the ballot that it has increased interest in the election on the part of young voters in particular, that it’s increased turnout in those states,” Guy Cecil, the chairman of Priorities USA, a well-funded organization that backs Democratic candidates.

Its sister group, Priorities USA Action, is a super PAC that supported President Barack Obama’s 2012 reelection effort as well as Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign. It is now focused on trying to help Democrats retake the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate.

But Cecil said that even though marijuana is good politics for Democrats, there are other reasons to support legalization.

“That’s not the reason somebody should be for it, but I certainly it’s a winner in terms of just the pure politics of it and the election,” he said. “Especially again when you’re dealing with a midterm where we’ve seen participation rates drop pretty steeply.”

The comments, part of a C-SPAN interview taped last week that aired on Sunday, come as a growing number of prominent Democratic lawmakers are getting on board with legalization.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), for example, announced last month that after a career spent championing the “war on drugs,” be would soon be introducing legislation to deschedule cannabis. And Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) this month reversed her long-held position that the federal government should prosecute people who are complying with state marijuana laws.

Younger Democrats like Sens. Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), who are both reportedly considering 2020 presidential runs — are way out front on legalization.

Cecil, who previously served as executive director for the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and as field director for Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign, said that support for ending marijuana prohibition is strong across the country.

“Certainly nationally you’re well over a majority of folks that have expressed approval for legalization,” he said.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Democratic Group Sees Political Value In Marijuana

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