Voters Ended Cannabis Prohibition in Oregon

Voters Ended Cannabis Prohibition in Oregon

In Oregon, pro-marijuana advocates have been working tirelessly for months, spreading word about the benefits that may come from legalizing cannabis, and yesterday it all came to fruition. The war on marijuana has been going strong since the mid 1930’s, but the everyone on the Measure 91 team, from the big names, familiar faces, and law enforcement officers all the way down to the foot soldiers, may finally rest easy today knowing that they have been triumphant. Yesterday, voters elected Oregon to be the third of the United States to legalize the recreational use and retail sale of marijuana. Congratulations, Oregon!

What exactly does this mean for residents of Oregon?

Although, Measure 91, also known as the Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act of 2014, may not legalize cannabis as an import or export crop for the state of Oregon, it does allow for recreational use by residents and retail sale of marijuana by licensed dispensaries within the state. Adults aged twenty-one years or older, will be permitted to possess up to eight ounces of dried marijuana flowers, and to cultivate up to four marijuana plants in a private residence. Under this measure, the retail sale of cannabis will be regulated by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. The state medical marijuana laws will remain unchanged.

This is only the beginning of a lengthy process for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission and the residents of Oregon. Measure 91 may have been approved by voters in November 2014, but it does not take effect until July 1, 2015. It is unlikely that retail marijuana dispensaries will be ready to open that day because the Oregon Liquor Control Commission has until the beginning of 2016 to issue business licenses. However, the OLCC may start drafting regulations, and accepting applications as soon as they are ready.

Congratulations are in order for the farmers of Oregon, as well, because under Measure 91, cultivating industrial hemp is also legalized!


photo credit: Oregonlive

The Third Time Really is the Charm for Legal Cannabis in Alaska

The Third Time Really is the Charm for Legal Cannabis in Alaska

Alaskan voters have had an on-again, off-again relationship with legal marijuana for years. The hard work campaigning and educating by the pro-marijuana advocates, this year, has finally come to fruition as yesterday, voters elected Alaska to be the fourth state to officially legalize the recreational use and retail sale of marijuana. Congratulations, Alaska, it has been a long and winding road!

In 1975, private possession of up to one ounce of marijuana was decriminalized in the state. Next, in 1998, Medical Marijuana was legalized. Then strangely in 1990, voters approved the Alaska Marijuana Criminalization Initiative, which re-criminalized possession of any amount of cannabis. Luckily for some, in 2003, the Alaska Court of Appeals overturned the Marijuana Criminalization Initiative, citing previous rulings as having precedence. That did not stop state legislators from once again attempting, unsuccessfully, to criminalize possession in 2006.

Measure 2, also known as the Act to Tax and Regulate the Production, Sale, and Use of Marijuana, the initiative that Alaskans passed yesterday, has been years in the making. Two other legalization initiatives have failed in the state, previously. In 2000, Measure 5 only won forty percent of the vote, and Measure 2 in 2004 only had forty-four percent support from voters. Yesterday, Measure 2, was approved by just over fifty-two percent of voters.

What does this mean for the residents of Alaska?

The bill does not become law until early 2015, but once in effect, it will legalize the recreational use of cannabis for adult residents aged twenty-one years or older, and regulate it similarly to alcohol. It also allows for the retail sale of marijuana by licensed dispensaries only. Of-age adults will be permitted to possess up to one ounces of dried marijuana flowers, and to cultivate up to six marijuana plants in a private residence.

Under this measure, the retail sale of cannabis will be regulated by the Department of Commerce, Community and Economic Development. The control board still has nine months to establish rules and regulations regarding business licensing and operations. The state medical marijuana laws will remain unchanged.

In the meantime, although Alaskans may not be able to buy pot at a store, they should not have to worry about going to jail for measly marijuana possession…as long as it is not being used in public because that is still illegal.

The photos below show the excitement of pro-marijuana advocates campaigning in Alaska yesterday.

Alaska legalized marijuana

pro-marijuana advocates campaigning in Alaska on election day 2014

photocredit: Alaska Dispatch News

Oregon is the Third State to Legalize Cannabis

Oregon is the Third State to Legalize Cannabis

In Oregon, pro-marijuana advocates have been working tirelessly for months, spreading word about the benefits that may come from legalizing cannabis, and yesterday it all came to fruition. The war on marijuana has been going strong since the mid 1930’s, but the everyone on the Measure 91 team, from the big names, familiar faces, and law enforcement officers all the way down to the foot soldiers, may finally rest easy today knowing that they have been triumphant. Yesterday, voters elected Oregon to be the third of the United States to legalize the recreational use and retail sale of marijuana. Congratulations, Oregon!

What exactly does this mean for residents of Oregon?

Although, Measure 91, also known as the Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act of 2014, may not legalize cannabis as an import or export crop for the state of Oregon, it does allow for recreational use by residents and retail sale of marijuana by licensed dispensaries within the state. Adults aged twenty-one years or older, will be permitted to possess up to eight ounces of dried marijuana flowers, and to cultivate up to four marijuana plants in a private residence. Under this measure, the retail sale of cannabis will be regulated by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. The state medical marijuana laws will remain unchanged.

This is only the beginning of a lengthy process for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission and the residents of Oregon. Measure 91 may have been approved by voters in November 2014, but it does not take effect until July 1, 2015. It is unlikely that retail marijuana dispensaries will be ready to open that day because the Oregon Liquor Control Commission has until the beginning of 2016 to issue business licenses. However, the OLCC may start drafting regulations, and accepting applications as soon as they are ready.

Congratulations are in order for the farmers of Oregon, as well, because under Measure 91, cultivating industrial hemp is also legalized!

photo credit: Oregonlive

Polls Show Approval for Legal Marijuana in Oregon

Polls Show Approval for Legal Marijuana in Oregon

Voters in Oregon may quite possibly make history today by becoming the third of the United States to legalize marijuana. On the ballot, Measure 91, also known as the Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act of 2014, will allow adults aged twenty-one years or older to possess up to eight ounces of dried marijuana flowers and up to four marijuana plants. Under this measure, the retail sale of cannabis will be regulated by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. The state medical marijuana laws will remain unchanged.

Support for what has been referred to as “the most regulated and strict marijuana measure ever voted upon in Oregon,” has been steady throughout the polling season, but in recent days it has increased. The most recent poll by Survey USA was released on October 28. It shows a majority of voters approve of the marijuana legalization initiative in the state. This poll shows fifty-two percent of all surveyed support voting yes on Measure 91, and this is the number advocates hope will show true at the end of the election day.

Poll shows support for marijuana legalization Oregon

The graph above depicts results from three different polls by Survey USA, and includes the most recent results that are written in the paragraph above. The far left on the graph shows results from poll released September 25, where voter approval of legalizing marijuana was only at forty-four percent. The middle number, showing a forty-eight percent approval for Measure 91 from likely voters, was released October 20. In about one month, voter approval increased four percent. The numbers on the far right are from the most recent poll, released October 28. Just eight days later, approval increased to fifty-two percent.

The likelihood of this marijuana law reform initiative being passed by voters increases with the number of votes being cast. Want to help the cause?

Send your friends in Oregon a friendly reminder to vote, no matter which side of the fence they are on, using a Facebook App. First, find out if your registered friends in Oregon have already voted by going to DidTheyVoteYet.Org. The app can be downloaded through that site, and it will search your Facebook friends for you. It will populate a list of your friends who have not yet cast a ballot, and then you can call and text them until they exercise their American right to vote. As the Measure 91 initiative pointed out, marijuana cannot legalize itself.

Measure 91 Oregon


photo credit: ABC News, Survey USA

Receive Real Time Election Results Today from L.E.A.P

Receive Real Time Election Results Today from L.E.A.P

The organization, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (L.E.A.P), will be announcing election results in real time today, according to Johnny Green with The Weed Blog. He received a message from his friends at the organization stating that L.E.A.P will announce updates throughout the day.

Included in the election day coverage will, of course, be the measures legalizing marijuana in Alaska, Oregon, and District of Columbia. Attention will also be focused on Amendment 2 for legal medical marijuana in Florida, and Proposition 47 in California, which would remove the charge for minor drug possession from the list of felony charges. The organization will be providing real time updates on their blog and Twitter, as well as sending press releases soon after all votes are counted and final. Members of L.E.A.P will also be available to comment on the results.

This evening (afternoon on the West Coast), Norm Stamper, member of L.E.A.P, will be hosting an open-to-the-public discussion through Reddit IAMA at 7:00pm ET. Reddit IAMA, standing for “ask me anything,” is a place for a person to write the information they want to share, and then answer questions asked by participants. Stamper’s purpose is to explain why he supports legalizing marijuana as well as to go over details of the current marijuana policy reform measures and why they are important. Stamper, a retired police chief from Seattle, has seen the benefits that come from marijuana legalization, and has spent the last week travelling to different parts of Alaska sharing his experiences, educating voters and supporting the legalization effort in the state.

photo credit: ©HTO3

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