Paul Ryan Touts The Benefits Of A Marijuana Ingredient And Industrial Hemp

Paul Ryan Touts The Benefits Of A Marijuana Ingredient And Industrial Hemp

The top Republican in the U.S. House has issued a surprise endorsement of a key marijuana ingredient’s medical benefits as well as the uses of industrial hemp.

“It has proven to work,” House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) said of cannabidiol (CBD) on Tuesday, specifying that it “helps reduce seizures.”

“We do this in Wisconsin,” he said, referring to his home state’s limited CBD law. “That that oil, I think works well.”

The speaker, who is not running for reelection and is retiring from Congress early next year, shared that his own mother-in-law used a synthetic form of cannabinoids, presumably the THC pill Marinol, while dying from melanoma and ovarian cancer.

“That’s off the record,” he said jokingly, referencing TV cameras at the well-attended Kentucky rally where he was appearing in support of Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY), who is locked in a tight reelection race.

Ryan, responding to a medical marijuana question from a woman whose husband passed away, also proactively took the opportunity to speak up in support of industrial hemp.

“And by the way, there’s a lot of industrial uses for hemp that I understand from talking to Mitch McConnell is a big deal to Kentucky agriculture,” he said. “And we’re all in favor of that as well.”

Ryan’s endorsement for hemp comes at a key time. Congressional leaders are currently negotiating differences in the House and Senate versions of the Farm Bill. The Senate proposal contains language championed by McConnell, the GOP majority leader, that would legalize hemp. The House bill has no such provisions.

If the top Republican in either chamber is now vocally in support of ending the prohibition on marijuana’s non-intoxicating cousin, it seems more and more likely that the House will accept the Senate’s hemp language.

That said, don’t count the outgoing speaker as a die-hard marijuana supporter, even when it comes to medical uses.

“Theres no THC in that oil,” he said, even though most CBD preparations do have small amounts of the intoxicating cannabis compound. “That is not medical marijuana.”

In response to the medical marijuana question, Ryan also touted passage this year of the Right to Try Act—which appears to allow certain seriously ill people to use marijuana and other currently illegal drugs such as psilocybin and MDMA, though he did not mention those implications directly.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Paul Ryan Touts The Benefits Of A Marijuana Ingredient And Industrial Hemp

Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore

Watch: Senator’s Spot-On Impression Of Mitch McConnell Talking About Marijuana

Watch: Senator’s Spot-On Impression Of Mitch McConnell Talking About Marijuana

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) was apparently taken aback when he heard that the red state of Utah is likely to legalize medical marijuana in November.

Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) said in an interview on Wednesday that the exchange took place during  Senate’s tax reform debate earlier this year, and he executed a pretty uncanny impression of McConnell in the retelling.

Asked by Capitol Hill newspaper Roll Call to share his favorite story about McConnell, Gardner said the two struck up a conversation on the Senate floor about marijuana and small business tax issues.

At the time, the Colorado senator was pushing an amendment to undo the provision in federal tax law known as 280E that prevents marijuana businesses from writing normal expenses off of their returns.

Gardner pressed McConnell on the issue, telling him that “47-plus states have legalized some form of marijuana, medical marijuana, CBD… Even Utah is most likely gonna legalize medical marijuana this year.”

“And McConnell looks at me and he goes, ‘Utah?’ And just this terrified look. Right as he says that, [Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT)] walks up, and Mitch looks at Orrin, and he says, ‘Orrin, is Utah really gonna legalize marijuana?’”

Then, looking at his feet, hands folded, the Mormon senator from Utah deadpanned: “First tea, then coffee, and now this.”

“It was just hysterical,” Gardner said.

You can watch the full Roll Call interview here.

https://www.facebook.com/RollCall/videos/1246044492202098/

Though McConnell isn’t quite the face of cannabis reform in Congress, he’s taken a leadership role in the fight to legalize industrial hemp—successfully securing a provision to accomplish just that in the Senate-passed version of the Farm Bill, which is now being reconciled with a proposal from the House that contains no hemp language.

Gardner, meanwhile, has embraced reforms sought by the legal cannabis industry in the years since Colorado became the first state to end marijuana prohibition in 2012.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Watch: Senator’s Spot-On Impression Of Mitch McConnell Talking About Marijuana

McConnell Inserts Hemp Legalization Into Farm Bill

McConnell Inserts Hemp Legalization Into Farm Bill

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is following through on a promise to use large-scale agriculture and food policy legislation as a vehicle to legalize hemp.

The GOP leader announced on Friday that he successfully inserted hemp provisions into the Farm Bill, which is expected to move through committee next week.

“Securing the Hemp Farming Act as part of the 2018 Farm Bill has been a top priority of mine,” McConnell said in a press release. “As a result of the hemp pilot program, which I secured in the 2014 Farm Bill, Kentucky’s farmers, processors, and manufacturers have begun to show the potential for this versatile crop. Today’s announcement will build upon that progress to help the Commonwealth enhance its standing at the forefront of hemp’s return to American agriculture. I look forward to continuing to work with my Senate colleagues and my partners in Kentucky – including Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture Ryan Quarles — to grow hemp’s bright future.”

The announcement comes three days after McConnell swiftly moved a resolution through the Senate acknowledging hemp’s “economic potential” and “historical relevance.” It was adopted without objection from any senator.

And on Wednesday, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) brought two huge baskets of non-psychoactive cannabis products onto the Senate floor to commemorate Hemp History Week.

This Lawmaker Just Brought Cannabis Products Onto The Senate Floor

“Hemp has proven itself as a job-creating growth industry with far-reaching economic potential. It’s just common sense that farmers in Oregon and across our country should be allowed to cultivate this cash crop,” Wyden said in McConnell’s new press release. “Our bipartisan legislation strikes America’s outdated anti-hemp laws from the books so American consumers can buy products made with hemp grown in America. I’m grateful to Sen. McConnell for his leadership in getting the Hemp Farming Act into the Senate Farm Bill and I’m proud to keep working with our bipartisan cosponsors – Senators Merkley and Paul – to pass our bill into law.”

In April, McConnell introduced a standalone bill to legalize hemp, and it already has nearly a third of senators signed on as cosponsors. He later announced plans to attach its provisions to the larger Farm Bill, a pledge he is making good on with Friday’s announcement.

When Congress last revised the Farm Bill, in 2014, McConnell was able to insert language shielding state industrial hemp research programs from federal interference. He and other supporters have included similar protections in annual spending bills as well.

While hemp products such as food, clothing and other consumer goods are legal to sell in the U.S., cultivation of the plant is banned outside of the limited exemption for state research programs, so manufacturers must in many cases import the raw materials from other countries that do no prohibit hemp farming.

That would change if the hemp provisions of the new Farm Bill make it to President Trump’s desk and are signed into law. In addition to removing hemp from the federal definition of marijuana, the Farm Bill provisions would make it eligible for federal crop insurance.

Last month, House Republicans blocked floor votes on several hemp-related amendments to that chamber’s version of the Farm Bill. But if the provisions get past the Senate, McConnell’s leadership and passion for the issue means they stand a good chance of being included in the final legislation that will be crafted by a House-Senate conference committee for delivery to the president.

Despite McConnell’s work on hemp, he does not support legalizing its psychoactive cannabis cousin marijuana, however. Despite the fact that Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) has joined McConnell’s hemp bill as a cosponsor, the GOP leader said he won’t be backinghis Democratic counterpart’s forthcoming bill to remove marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act.

“These are two entirely separate plants,” McConnell said. “There is a lot of confusion about what hemp is. It has an illicit cousin, which I choose not to embrace.”

McConnell And Schumer Discuss Each Other’s Cannabis Bills

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

McConnell Inserts Hemp Legalization Into Farm Bill

 

Here’s What The DEA Told Agents About Cannabis Enforcement This Week

Here’s What The DEA Told Agents About Cannabis Enforcement This Week

Officials with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) aren’t allowed to mess with businesses that sell certain cannabis products, the agency clarified to personnel in an internal directive on Tuesday.

However, the directive went on to assert the continuing validity of an earlier Federal Register notice that claimed cannabis extracts—including products that “contain only one cannabinoid” such as cannabidiol (CBD)—fall under Schedule I and are thus banned.

The new directive issued this week states: “Products and materials that are made from the cannabis plant and which fall outside the [Controlled Substances Act] definition of marijuana (such as sterilized seeds, oil or cake made from the seeds, and mature stalks) are not controlled under the CSA” and, thus, “[s]uch products may accordingly be sold and otherwise distributed throughout the United States without restriction under the CSA or its implementing regulations.”

“The mere presence of cannabinoids is not itself dispositive as to whether a substance is within the scope of the CSA; the dispositive question is whether the substance falls within the CSA definition of marijuana.”

Yet the agency also maintained the legitimacy of its recently clarified ban on cannabinoids, including CBD—whether its extracted from marijuana or hemp.

The DEA said it decided to issue the directive “[i]n response to various inquiries.” It seems people have had some questions about the agency’s seemingly contradictory positions.

The legal confusion over the DEA’s enforcement authority on hemp goes back to a 2004 Ninth Circuit Court ruling. In essence, the court sided with the Hemp Industries Association that the DEA had overreached its authority with respect to hemp products. Even though hemp may contain trace amounts of THC, hemp products are not included in the CSA—and, therefore, the agency is not permitted to regulate the industrial crop, the court ruled.

The DEA acknowledged as much in its new directive.

Eric Steenstra, president of the advocacy group Vote Hemp, told Marijuana Moment in an email that this concession was “the result of a negotiated settlement with the Hemp Industries Association.”

The fact that the DEA is insisting CBD and other cannabinoids remain illegal, no matter the source, gets into another contradictory policy matter: the 2014 Farm Bill.

While the DEA’s New Drug Code rule with respect to cannabis extracts was upheld in a different Ninth Circuit Court ruling last month, the agricultural law lets states authorize the growing of hemp containing trace amounts of THC under pilot programs. Further, the court determined that the Farm Bill’s hemp provision “preempts” the CSA.

As cannabis attorney Daniel Shortt wrote in a recent blog post, the court stated “that when the Industrial Hemp portions of the Farm Bill conflict with the CSA, the Farm Bill prevails.”

There’s been significant debate and confusion over the accurate interpretation of the DEA’s policy with regard to CBD and hemp. The DEA, for its part, seems to acknowledge that in its new directive.

The most promising prospect of clarification or reform on the issue could come from a bill introduced by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), who is calling on the federal government to remove hemp from the list of federally banned substances. He has already announced plans to insert hemp legalization language into this year’s version of the Farm Bill.

For now, DEA says that hemp products can be legally imported into and exported out of the U.S., even if current law doesn’t allow for legal hemp cultivation by American farmers.

“[A]ny product that the U.S. Customs and Border Protection determines to be made from the cannabis plant but which falls outside the CSA definition of marijuana may be imported into the United States without restriction under the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act,” the new notice reads. “The same considerations apply to exports of such products from the United States, provided further that it is lawful to import such products under the laws of the country of destination.”

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Here’s What The DEA Told Agents About Cannabis Enforcement This Week

Congressional Republicans Block Votes On Hemp Amendments

Congressional Republicans Block Votes On Hemp Amendments

In the latest development in a series of anti-cannabis moves, congressional Republican leadership has blocked consideration of several industrial hemp amendments.

Supporters were seeking to attach the measures to the large-scale Farm Bill, which sets food and agriculture policy for the country, but the House Rules Committee on Wednesday decided that the proposals cannot be considered on the floor.

The anti-cannabis chairman of the panel did, however, reveal that a broader deal for industrial hemp might be in the works.

One of the measures the committee killed, submitted by Reps. James Comer (R-KY) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), along with a bipartisan list of cosponsors, would have legalized hemp and made it eligible for crop insurance.

“Hemp is a crop with a long and rich history in our country,” Comer said in introducing his amendment before the committee. “It was grown by many of our founding fathers.”

Comer, who is a former Kentucky agriculture commissioner, said his state’s existing industrial hemp research program, which is authorized under a previous Farm Bill enacted in 2014, “has been a great success.”

He also spoke about the economic potential of the plant. “Times are tough in rural america,” he said. “For rural Kentuckians, industrial hemp has provided a new crop and business opportunity.”

But in a party-line move, the committee voted 8 to 3 to reject a motion to add Comer’s amendment to the list of proposals approved for floor consideration.

Another hemp amendment, filed by Reps. Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Jared Polis (D-CO), would have removed hemp from the list of federally banned substances.

A third proposal, submitted by Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY), sought to create “a safe harbor for financial institutions that provide services to hemp legitimate businesses” that operate under state-authorized research programs.

“There is a proud history in American and in Kentucky [for hemp] as an agriculture product,” Barr said when testifying for his amendment, noting that it can be used in over 25,000 products.

Under current law, banks that work with legitimate hemp companies “fear reprisal from federal regulators,” Barr said, arguing that his proposed measure would protect financial institutions “from unnecessary interference from bank examiners and regulators” and give producers rights that “every other American crop enjoys.”

The committee did not hold specific votes on those two measures.

Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions (R-TX) has made a consistent practice of blocking cannabis measures from advancing over the past several years.

Sessions, seemingly mistakenly, told Comer during the Wednesday hearing that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has “a clause…that industrial hemp should be declassified under their Schedule I drugs, which they concur, which is the position you hold, too.”

A hemp lobbyist told Marijuana Moment in an email that he had not heard of the DEA taking a pro-hemp position.

Polis, who as a Rules Committee member made the unsuccessful motion to let the full House vote on Comer’s amendment, argued that hemp is a “common sense area” that enjoys bipartisan support. The measure, he said, would simply “treat industrial hemp as the agricultural commodity that it is.”

While Sessions and other GOP panel members were not swayed, the chairman did hint just before the vote that there may still be hope for hemp reform, saying that the issue would be “determined by an agreement that would be reached” with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY).

McConnell last month filed a hemp legalization bill, which Comer’s amendment closely modeled. Fully a fifth of the Senate is now signed on as cosponsoring that legislation, and the majority leader has already announced plans to attach his hemp language to the version of the Farm Bill being considered by the Senate this month.

While it is unclear what exactly Sessions was suggesting when he referred to an “agreement” with McConnell, it may have been a reference to the conference committee process that will merge the House and Senate’s respective versions of the Farm Bill into a single proposal after each chamber passes its legislation. If McConnell succeeds in attaching hemp legalization to the Senate bill, it would then be up for consideration as part of the final legislation sent to President Trump for signing into law.

In 2014, McConnell successfully inserted a provision to prevent federal interference in hemp research programs in that year’s version of the Farm Bill.

https://massroots.wpengine.com/news/congress-considers-three-hemp-amendments-farm-bill/

Read the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Congressional Republicans Block Votes On Hemp Amendments

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