Poll Reveals Most Americans Approve Of Legal Marijuana Laws

Poll Reveals Most Americans Approve Of Legal Marijuana Laws

A recent poll found that fifty-five percent of American adults think that the laws regulating the legal cannabis markets in some states are successful, or that they are at least “more of a success than a failure.”

The survey, taken by YouGov on April 20 of this year, asked 27,328 Americans living in the states that have already enacted laws to legalize marijuana, “Do you think the legislation has been a success or a failure?”

The poll provided 5 response options to participants:

  • Success only
  • More of a success than a failure
  • More of a failure than a success
  • Failure only
  • Don’t know
One in five Americans think legislation for recreational marijuana has been a success

Combining to account for the majority, thirty-six percent of poll participants say the laws regulating the legal cannabis markets in eleven of the states are “more of a success than a failure” and nineteen percent replied that they are a total success. 

Believing the opposite, thirteen percent of respondents stated that recreational legalization laws have been “more of a failure than a success.” Only six percent view the legislation as a complete failure. Unsure of the effectiveness of the laws, twenty-six percent of people replied that they “don’t know.” 

YouGov sorted the survey results according to:

  • Geographical region
  • Gender
  • Political affiliation
  • Age
  • Income level

Significant imbalances in responses among the geographical regions, gender, age, and income levels of poll participants were not observed.

Disparity Among Political Parties

Disparity among political parties for recreational marijuana being a success or a failure

The only category that produced a notable difference among respondents was political party affiliation. Not surprisingly, Democrats and Independents were more likely to reply that the legislation was a “success only” or “more of a success than a failure” than their Republican counterparts. 

Sixty-seven percent of Democrats and fifty-four percent of Independents attested that regulated markets were operating within one of the two positive poll response choices. Forty-one percent of poll participants that described themselves as Republican also categorized the legislation as successful.

Independents (21 percent) were more likely than Democrats (10 percent) to consider the law to be a complete failure or “more of a failure than a success.” Thirty-four percent of Republicans agreed that the legislation is unsuccessful.

National Shift Toward Support

Another YouGov poll administered on the same day found that sixty-two percent of Americans believe that the use of cannabis will be legal in every one of the United States within the next decade and that fifty percent of voters believe that “recreational marijuana should be legalized.”

In-line with the results of this recent poll from YouGov, the opinion of the majority of Americans has been steadily shifting in support of legalization for many years now. A poll released by Gallup last year revealed that an even greater percentage of voters (66 percent) are now in favor of a regulated recreational cannabis market. That number increased from fifty-eight percent, according to a 2015 Gallup poll.


Polls from the last several years show that most voters in states like Maryland, Connecticut, and Wisconsin support the recreational legalization of marijuana. Some large cities in states where the plant has not yet been legalized for recreational use, like New Orleans, LA, and Dallas, TX, have still supported the trend by choosing to decriminalize personal possession.

Marijuana Use Is More Moral Than Porn, Death Penalty and Cloning, Americans Say

Marijuana Use Is More Moral Than Porn, Death Penalty and Cloning, Americans Say

A strong majority of Americans believe that marijuana use is “morally acceptable,” according to a Gallup poll released on Monday.

Sixty-five percent of Americans agreed that cannabis consumption was morally OK, which “nearly matches” the percentage of Americans who think marijuana should be legal.

But just how moral do Americans consider sparking a joint? One way to measure that is by looking at how respondents answered questions about the morality of other controversial topics.

Gallup Poll Marijuana Use

While more Americans (78 percent) said drinking alcohol was morally acceptable compared to marijuana use, they view cannabis consumption as more moral than the death penalty, medical testing on animals, physician assisted suicide, abortion, pornography, cloning animals, polygamy and extramarital affairs.

Gallup summed up the survey with a pointed observation:

“Most Americans do not object on moral grounds to people drinking alcohol or smoking marijuana. Of the two, they are more likely to see drinking alcohol as an acceptable behavior, perhaps because it is legal in all states while smoking marijuana is not. Some states have recently legalized marijuana and many others are considering doing so, perhaps removing some of the stigma associated with the drug. But with roughly two-thirds of the public saying marijuana use is morally acceptable, it seems there will not be sufficient opposition to thwart attempts to make it legal.”

Similar to public opinion for marijuana legalization, there were some demographic differences in views on the morality of marijuana use. For example, “highly religious” Americans were more likely to say marijuana and alcohol use were immoral.

Age was another factor. A considerable 77 percent of Americans between 18 and 34 consider marijuana use morally acceptable, while 58 percent of Americans 55 and over said the same.

A majority of Americans feel that cannabis use is moral with the exception of two demographics: people who attend church every week (41 percent) and people who characterized their political ideology as “conservative” (47 percent).

separate Gallup survey found last year that 64 percent of Americans favor legalizing marijuana, the highest level of support in the firm’s 48 years of polling on the topic.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Marijuana Use Is More Moral Than Porn, Death Penalty and Cloning, Americans Say

Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

More American voters now support legalizing marijuana than ever before, a new poll shows.

Sixty-three percent are now in favor of ending cannabis prohibition, with just 33 percent against, the new Quinnipiac University survey showed. Seventy-five percent of Democrats, 67 percent of independents and 41 percent of Republicans are on board.

The poll also showed that voters broadly oppose federal intervention in state marijuana laws, with just 23 percent supporting such interference. Strong majorities in every political, age, racial, gender and educational demographic support letting local cannabis polices be implemented.

When it comes to medical cannabis, 93 percent of voters were in favor, with just five percent against, the poll found.

Among voters in states that have already legalized marijuana, 48 percent said the move has been good for their state, with just 25 percent saying it has been a negative experience.

On the question of whether marijuana is a gateway drug, only 31 percent of voters agree, with 61 percent disputing the notion that cannabis leads to use of other substances.

The survey also asked about the economic impact of legalization and its impact on opioid use, as well as whether disagreeing with a politician’s stance on cannabis would make voters less likely to support him or her.

While Gallup found last year that 64 percent of Americans support legalizing marijuana, the 63 percent figure among voters is the highest level ever shown in ongoing surveys from Quinnipiac.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

Adult Use of Cannabis Doubles in 12 Years

Adult Use of Cannabis Doubles in 12 Years

A survey released by JAMA Psychiatry on October 21 revealed that the number of American adults who admit to using cannabis has doubled between 2001 and 2013. In 2001, only four percent of adults admitted to using cannabis. Twelve years later, in 2013, the number had increased to nearly 10 percent. Concluded the survey:

“The prevalence of marijuana use more than doubled between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013.”

Many media outlets have noted that increased use coincided with a more lenient attitude toward cannabis on the part of American adults and an increased willingness to legalize the herb. The most recent survey from Gallup regarding Americans’ acceptance of cannabis reveals that 58 percent support full legalization of the plant and the many medical and recreational products that can be produced from it. This is a significant shift. The latest polling numbers reveal that the nation has gone from a minority (48 percent) supporting cannabis legalization in 2013 to a majority supporting it only two years later.

adult-use-of-cannabis-doubles-in-12-years-1

In 2002, at the beginning of the period covered by the JAMA study, only one-third of Americans favored legalization of cannabis, according to the Gallup numbers. Many speculate that the successful examples of legalization set forth by states like Colorado, Washington, and Oregon — and the resulting media attention devoted to these “experiments” — has begun to educate average citizens and has brought the topic into the mainstream. The JAMA Psychiatry figures obviously don’t account for this additional increase during the past two years.

As additional states come online and Canada screams its intent to the international community to legalize recreational cannabis within its borders, the topic of marijuana and its prohibition will become increasingly common in the media and on the minds of average consumers. This will encourage many to investigate the topic to learn the facts. Of these, many will conclude that cannabis is a safe and therapeutic herb that is considerably better than alcohol and opiates.

Increased use of cannabis and the economic and public health success of states like Oregon and Washington will continue to educate average Americans of the relative benefits of cannabis use, especially when compared to alcohol and pharmaceutical drugs and their negative, often life-threatening side effects.

Photo credit: Drug Policy Alliance

Majority of Americans Support Marijuana Legalization

Majority of Americans Support Marijuana Legalization

As states continue to reform out-dated marijuana laws, both medical and recreational, public support for legalization is maintaining an all-time high throughout the United States.

According to the most recent survey from Gallup, an organization that has been tracking responses to the question about cannabis legalization since 1969, 58 percent of Americans believe that the use of marijuana should be legal in the United States. The poll has received 58 percent support in each of the last two years (2014-2015), which is a significant  increase over the only 48 percent who favored legalization just two years ago (2013).

Gallup has reported in the past that age and political party are two of the bigger distinctions between those who support legalization and those who are against it. While the younger Americans, democrats and independents tend to lean towards nationwide legalization, the older generation and republicans are less likely to agree.

gallup 2015

The new study reveals that senior citizens have greatly increased their support of legalization since the original survey in 1969, as their vote is up by more than 30 percent. Even those in the 18-to-34-year-old age group who are in favor of legalization has grown significantly from 20 percent in 1969 to 71 percent today. Tom Angell, the founder of Marijuana Majority, commented on the results of the recent Gallup study,

“These days it’s not especially exciting to see yet another poll showing majority support for legalizing marijuana, but 58 percent is very strong share of the American people calling for change, and elected officials should listen. The constant stream of surveys showing public support for ending prohibition is why we’re seeing an increasing number of national politicians saying that it’s time to at least let states implement their own laws without federal interference.”

Angell continued,

“And we’re also seeing a growing number candidates endorsing legalization outright, which shows how mainstream this issue is now. As more states implement marijuana reforms and those laws continue to work as advertised, we’re likely to see even more public support, which should soon spur Congress to formally end the criminalization of cannabis under federal law.”

With four states, as well as the District of Columbia, legalizing marijuana for recreational use, it appears that this trend of growing national support will continue. As the older generations begin to open up to the idea of cannabis policy reform, the percentage of those in favor should continue to rise in the coming years.

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']