GOP Gubernatorial Candidate Tells Opponent To Smoke Marijuana During Debate

GOP Gubernatorial Candidate Tells Opponent To Smoke Marijuana During Debate

Rhode Island’s Republican gubernatorial nominee suggested that an opponent should smoke marijuana to relax amidst a combative debate performance on Thursday night.

“Someone needs to get a joint for Joe to get him to calm down a bit,” GOP candidate Allan Fung said, referring to feisty independent contender Joe Trillo.

“You probably smoke it all the time,” shot back Trillo, a former state lawmaker.

“I think we made the news cuts for tomorrow,” debate moderator Gene Valicenti of NBC 10 quipped in response to the joint-smoking sniping between the candidates.

On a more serious note, Fung, the mayor of Cranston, said that he is “open to legalization so long as the enforcement concerns” are addressed.

“I’d even go so far as to put it on the ballot.”

Trillo had said he could only consider supporting legalization when better roadside impairment detection methods are developed, adding in that case he would also put the question on the ballot for voters to decide.

For her part, incumbent Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) said during the exchange that she is “open to” legalization but is “cautious” about it. She is concerned it is “hard to regulate so it doesn’t get into the hands of kids.”

Moderate Party candidate Bill Gilbert said he supports legalizing cannabis.

The exchange comes as a new Marijuana Moment analysis published Thursday shows that more than 20 major party gubernatorial candidates in the U.S. support legalizing marijuana, with many more supporting other cannabis reforms.

See Rhode Island gubernatorial candidates debate marijuana, at 38:30 into this video:

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

GOP Gubernatorial Candidate Tells Opponent To Smoke Marijuana During Debate

GOP Congressman Visits Marijuana Dispensary With Bus Full Of Senior Citizens

GOP Congressman Visits Marijuana Dispensary With Bus Full Of Senior Citizens

A Republican congressman in the midst of an especially challenging reelection race took time on Tuesday to accompany a literal busload of elderly citizens on a visit to a marijuana store.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), who is one of Congress’s leading proponents of cannabis reform, is the lead sponsor of a successful amendment that prevents the Justice Department from interfering with state medical marijuana laws.

But he might not be around on Capitol Hill next year to champion the measure’s extension if Democratic challenger Harley Rouda has his way. Several polls heading into next month’s election have shown the two running neck and neck.

But that didn’t stop the GOP incumbent from a trip to the local marijuana dispensary. Or perhaps the move was all part of the Rohrabacher campaign’s effort to remind voters of his cannabis accomplishments in Congress.

Either way, several journalists went along for the ride and documented the congressman’s weed field trip.

Earlier this week, Rohrabacher said that he’s been “talking to people inside the White House” and has received assurances that “the president intends on keeping his campaign promise” to protect state marijuana laws from federal interference.

https://massroots.wpengine.com/news/trump-plans-back-legal-medical-marijuana-midterms-gop-congressman-says/

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

GOP Congressman Visits Marijuana Dispensary With Bus Full Of Senior Citizens

Analysis: GOP Congress Has Blocked Dozens Of Marijuana Amendments

Analysis: GOP Congress Has Blocked Dozens Of Marijuana Amendments

Increase military veterans’ access to access medical cannabis. Shield state marijuana laws from federal interference. Protect industrial hemp growers’ water rights. Allow marijuana businesses to be taxed fairly and to access banking services.

That describes just some of the nearly three dozen cannabis-related amendments that Republican leadership in the U.S. House of Representatives has blocked from even being voted on during the current Congress, a new analysis by Marijuana Moment finds.

On at least 34 occasions, lawmakers—Democrats and Republicans alike—filed marijuana and drug policy reform proposals only to be stymied by the powerful Rules Committee, which decides which measures can advance to the House floor.

One Man Is The Biggest Obstacle To Congressional Marijuana Reform.

That panel, led by Congressman Pete Sessions (R-TX), has for the past several years instituted an effective roadblock to cannabis law reform by refusing to make any amendments dealing with the plant “in order.” That means the full 435-member roster of House never even gets an opportunity to vote on the measures.

https://massroots.wpengine.com/news/man-reason-congress-cant-vote-marijuana-anymore/

This analysis only covers the current 115th Congress, which began in January 2017. Republican leaders have made a practice of blocking cannabis amendments since the previous summer.

The last time the House was allowed to vote on marijuana, in May 2016, a measure to allow military veterans to get medical cannabis recommendations from Department of Veterans Affairs doctors was approved by a overwhelming vote of 233 to 189. Several other marijuana measures were approved on the House floor in the two years preceding that, including proposals to let marijuana businesses store their profits in banks and to protect state medical cannabis laws from Justice Department interference, the latter of which made it into federal law and is still on the books.

In June 2015, an amendment to expand that protection to prevent the Department of Justice from interfering with all state marijuana laws—including those allowing recreational marijuana use and sales—came just nine flipped votes short of passage.

Since that time, the number of states with legal marijuana has more than doubled, meaning that far more legislators now represent constituents who would stand to be protected. Advocates are confident they could get the measure approved if given another opportunity, but the cannabis blockade by Sessions’s Rules Committee has meant that no more votes on it have been allowed.

While House Republicans have instituted a broader policy of blocking amendments deemed to be “controversial” after floor disputes on gay rights and gun policy measures threatened the passage of several spending bills in 2015, Sessions, who is not related to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, seems to have a particular problem with marijuana.

“I, as probably everybody in this rooms knows, have a strong opinion on drugs, illegal drugs, alcohol,” he said just before stymying a measure to prevent federal intervention in state cannabis laws earlier this year. “Marijuana is an addictive product, and the merchants of addiction make it that way. They make it for addiction. They make it to where our people, our young people, become addicted to marijuana and keep going.”

On another occasion, Sessions claimed that cannabis is now more potent than it was when he was a young man—by a mathematically impossible factor.

“When I went to high school…in 1973, I graduated, marijuana, on average, is 300 times more powerful,” he said. “That becomes an addictive element for a child to then go to the next thing.”

Legalization Supporters Target Sessions For Defeat.

Sessions, like all members of the House, is up for reelection this year. The Cook Political Report, which tracks congressional races, moved his seat—Texas’s 32nd congressional district—from being rated “Lean Republican” to the closer “Toss Up” status last month. In 2016, Hillary Clinton won the district.

Sensing an opportunity, marijuana reform advocates are targeting Sessions for defeat in 2018.

Pro-legalization Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), who has authored several of the blocked amendments, started a PAC and pledged to fund in-district billboards spotlighting Sessions’s anti-cannabis tactics.

Medical Marijuana Veterans

Six of the amendments blocked by Sessions and his committee concerned military veterans’ access to medical cannabis. Five had to do with marijuana businesses’ ability to use banking services. Seven would have allowed states and Washington, D.C. to implement their own marijuana laws without federal interference.

“These are not controversial measures. They have bipartisan support,” Blumenauer told Marijuana Moment in an emailed statement. “By blocking our amendments, Sessions is standing in the way of progress, commonsense, and the will of the American people—and that includes Republican voters.”

Pro-Legalization Congressman To Target Anti-Cannabis Lawmakers

Sessions faces Democrat Colin Allred, a former NFL player, in November.

“I support the use of medical marijuana as an alternative to the habit-forming opioids that have become a national crisis,” the challenger told Politico. “This common-sense approach to alternative treatments has been opposed by Pete Sessions, and is something I will fight to expand.”

The willingness to see Sessions go extends even to dedicated Republicans who could risk seeing control of the House tipped to Democrats in what is expected to be a very close midterm election overall.

“More often than not, elected officials respond to carrots and sticks. So if making Pete Sessions an electoral casualty is what it takes to advance drug policy reform, so be it,” Don Murphy, a Republican former Maryland state lawmaker who now serves as federal policies director for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), told Marijuana Moment. “If the GOP loses control of the House by one vote, it won’t be my fault. I tried to warn them.”

Former MPP executive director Rob Kampia says he’s aiming to raise half a million dollars to pour into the effort to defeat Sessions with his new outfit, the Marijuana Leadership Campaign, and a related political action committee.

More Cannabis Amendments Are Likely To Be Blocked Soon.

In the meantime, it seems likely that even more cannabis proposals will be added to the blocked tally when the Rules Committee considers a broad funding package this week which includes the Financial Services and General Government bill. Earlier versions of that annual appropriations legislation have been used as vehicles for measures concerning Washington, D.C.’s ability to spend its own money regulating marijuana and to allow cannabis growers, processors and retailers to access financial services.

Marijuana Moment’s analysis of blocked marijuana amendments relies heavily on a reportissued in late May by Rules Committee Democrats, which tallied all blocked amendments across issues up to that point. (Marijuana Moment identified several subsequent cannabis measures that were prevented from reaching the floor following the Democratic report’s release.)

“Shutting down amendments and preventing debate is bad for the Congress as an institution, but is even worse for the country,” the Rules Committee minority, led by Congressman James McGovern of Massachusetts, wrote. “The inevitable result is partisan legislation written by a small number of Members, staff and lobbyists, with many bipartisan priorities left out in the cold.”

“Blocking amendments shuts out members of Congress from offering their ideas to improve legislation, and in doing so silences the voices of the millions of Americans they are elected to represent. So far during this record-breaking closed 115th Congress, 380 Members have had at least one amendment blocked from consideration by the Republican-controlled Rules Committee and Republican Leadership.

“These districts account for 270 million Americans. In other words, Representatives from roughly 80 percent of the county have been blocked from offering an idea for debate on the House Floor – the ideas their constituents sent them to Congress to advocate for on their behalf.”

In the report, which dubs the 115th Congress “the most closed Congress in history,” Democrats call out Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI), who pledged to “uphold the rights of the minority” and “have a process that is more open, more inclusive, more deliberative, more participatory.”

“You are the first Speaker in history to have never allowed a truly open rule, which would permit all Members to offer their ideas on the floor of the House,” McGovern and Democratic colleagues wrote.

“The People’s House is meant to operate as a deliberative body. Shutting out the voices of the representatives of hundreds of millions of Americans erodes the foundation of our democracy, and makes the job of governing increasingly more difficult.”

While the Democrats highlight several issue areas such as guns, immigration, the environment, veterans affairs and criminal justice reform in their report narrative, they do not specially discuss the blocked marijuana amendments, which are included in an appendix that lists every submitted measure not “made in order” by the Rules Committee.

Among the cannabis-related amendments impeded during this Congress were measures to reduce funding for the Drug Enforcement Administration’s marijuana eradication efforts, shield military veterans from losing their benefits due to cannabis use, expand research on marijuana’s medical benefits, allow Indian tribes to enter the cannabis industry and create a federal excise tax on marijuana sales.

There were also measures that would have granted an official congressional apology for the damage done by the war on drugs and ceased the practice of punishing states that don’t automatically revoke drivers licenses from people convicted of drug offenses.

At a time when marijuana law reform enjoys overwhelming support from voters, and more states are modernizing their cannabis laws, lawmakers in the so-called “People’s House” are not even allowed to vote on the issue.

The Senate Saves The Day. Maybe.

For the past several years, cannabis reform advocates have been largely relying on the Senate to advance their proposals. Last month, for example, that chamber’s Appropriations Committee approved measures on veterans’ medical cannabis access and preventing Justice Department intervention in state medical marijuana laws. (The panel, however, blocked an amendment on banking for marijuana businesses.)

Meanwhile, advocates this year for the first time advanced a marijuana amendment out the House Appropriations Committee, circumventing the Pete Sessions floor blockade. That measure, to shield state medical cannabis laws from federal interference, has historically required House floor votes—now impossible, thanks to Sessions—or Senate action to advance.

The ultimate fate of the various Senate-approved marijuana measures now rests with bicameral conference committees that will merge the two chambers’ bills into single proposals to be sent to President Trump’s desk.

For example, both the Senate and the House approved separate versions of large-scale food and agriculture legislation known as the Farm Bill this year, but only the Senate version has hemp legalization language in it. Sessions’s Rules Committee blocked a House vote. It will be up to the conference committee to decide which version prevails.

Regardless of which party controls the chamber when the 116th Congress is seated in January, Ryan, who is retiring, will be gone. And if legalization supporters have their way, so will Sessions.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Analysis: GOP Congress Has Blocked Dozens Of Marijuana Amendments

 

 

 

 

Congressional GOP Blocks Marijuana Votes (Again)

Congressional GOP Blocks Marijuana Votes (Again)

Republican leaders in Congress really, really don’t want their fellow lawmakers to have the chance to vote on marijuana amendments.

In the latest in a long series of roadblocks thrown up in front of developments on the issue over the past several years, a key House panel prevented four cannabis measures from reaching the floor on Wednesday night.

Three of the proposals concerned military veterans’ ability to access medical cannabis without punishment or hardship, and one was about water rights for marijuana and hemp growers.

All four were blocked by the Rules Committee and its chairman, Pete Sessions (R-TX).

One of the amendments, a move to allow veterans to receive medical cannabis recommendations from their Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) doctors, has previously been approved by both the full House and Senate, but has never been enacted into law.

Sessions and fellow Republicans did not allow the measure to advance to the floor this year.

Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) who led the push for the amendment, along with at least 17 cosponsors, said that too many veterans have been “shamefully treated by the VA,” which forces them to seek medical marijuana recommendations from outside doctors who are often expensive and don’t know their health histories.

“It’s in keeping with trying to discourage free flow of ideas here in the House,” Blumenauer told Marijuana Moment in an interview earlier on Wednesday, anticipating the Rules Committee’s continuing cannabis blockade. “Pretty miserable legacy, and this is an example something that the overwhelming majority of people in both the House and the Senate support. There’s bipartisan support for it. There’s no reason that it shouldn’t be debated.”

The Oregon Democrat predicted that Republicans would find themselves on the wrong side of the politics of marijuana.

“It’s ultimately going to be self-defeating because we are going to win on this,” he said. “I don’t think it helps the Republican leadership to be on the wrong side of history of something that even a majority of Republicans support. But it’s a symbol of how far out of touch they are and how narrowly controlling.”

But he did note that a growing number of rank-and-file GOP members are taking pro-cannabis-reform positions in contravention of their party’s leadership.

“I think you’re watching that Republicans are changing,” he said. “They know that what Sessions is doing is not good for them politically.”

Another amendment that the Rules Committee blocked on Wednesday would have protected veterans from losing access to their VA benefits as a punishment for medical marijuana use.

A third would have shielded VA employees who are veterans and who use marijuana in accordance with state law from being fired.

The last would have prevented the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation from enforcing a rule that denies access to water rights for cannabis cultivators.

None were allowed for consideration by the full House.

Supporters were seeking to attach the proposals to legislation to fund parts of the federal government for Fiscal Year 2019, namely the VA and military construction efforts, as well as energy and water programs. Also being considered as part of the “minibus” spending bill are funds for the legislative branch.

Separately, the Senate Appropriations Committee is expected to consider a version of the veterans medical cannabis recommendation amendment on Thursday.

Sessions, who is not related to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, has made a practice of blocking any and all cannabis amendments over the course of the past several years.

Last month, for example, the Rules Committee prevented a series of hemp-related amendments to the Farm Bill from being considered.

Matt Laslo contributed reporting from Washington, D.C.

The full text of all four amendments blocked by the Rules Committee can be seen in Marijuana Moment’s previous coverage:

Republican Rule Change Allows Marijuana Use By Judge Nominees

Republican Rule Change Allows Marijuana Use By Judge Nominees

For the past several decades, the U.S. Senate has blocked judicial nominees who have used marijuana after taking the bar exam from being confirmed. But now, under a rule change made quietly by Republicans, those restrictions are being scaled back. And Democrats, who say they have no problem in principle with the move, are criticizing their GOP counterparts for reducing judicial cannabis discrimination only now that Republicans control the Senate and the White House.

“Since at least the Clinton administration, Judiciary Committee Republicans did not clear background investigations of judicial nominees who reported to the FBI that they had ever used marijuana after taking the bar exam,” Democrats on the Judiciary Committee wrote in a new report. “Because of this Republican policy, a number of judicial nominees were either blocked or never nominated in the first place.”

But under a new policy enacted by Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA), candidates to be judges can have consumed marijuana up to two times after taking the bar exam if the use was at least five years prior to the date of their nomination to the federal bench.

“While Democrats did not object to the policy change on the merits,” the minority party’s new report says, “Republicans only made this change because of a political change to Republican control of the presidency and Senate.”

The move was the subject of a debate during a Judiciary Committee meeting last November.

“Over time, there’s been an evolving attitude in our society towards marijuana,” Grassley said at the time, defending the rule change. “And I suppose as I’ve looked at it over a period of time in which I’ve had this absolute prohibition attitude that I’ve demonstrated maybe not in public but in private about it, I’ve come to the conclusion that sometime down the road — and we may be down the road there now — that we, if [marijuana use is] the sole judgement of whether somebody ought to have a judgeship or not, or maybe any other position, we may not be able to find people to fill those positions.”

Democrats argued that the timing of the change seemed too convenient for Republicans.

“I know of some who would have been top-notch federal judges [and] were disqualified and stopped by Republican senators,” Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) said, referring to Obama-era nominees. “I am not opposed to a different standard, but we should not have a double standard for nominees who are presented under a Democratic president and nominees that are presented under a Republican president. And we need to be transparent about what we are doing and why we are doing it.”

Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) agreed, saying, “There’s seems to be one standard with a Republican administration [and] a different one with a Democratic administration. It’s tougher on the Democrats. I’m just saying, let’s have one standard. It may evolve.”

Democrats included their complaints about the marijuana use rule change as part of a larger 61-page report they issued on Thursday criticizing what they see as Republican efforts to “stack” federal courts.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Republican Rule Change Allows Marijuana Use By Judge Nominees

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