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Stop Sign Suggested as Cannabis Edibles Identifier

Stop Sign Suggested as Cannabis Edibles Identifier

A red stop sign may soon indicate that an edible product is infused with cannabis, as outlined by a new draft of regulations released by Colorado marijuana industry regulators.

Additionally, the state is considering placing a ban on using the word “candy” on any marijuana consumables, even if they come in typical candy form, such as in lollipop shapes.

The new rules must undergo a public hearing before they are officially adopted, but if passed, marijuana-infused edible products would have to sport a red, octagon-shaped symbol with the letters “THC” inscribed inside to ensure consumers are aware of its presence. Furthermore, the symbol would be required to adorn the actual, edible product (not just its labeling), and marijuana edibles in liquid form would only be sold in single-serve packages containing 10 milligrams of THC.

“It’s time we have a tool to really let people know there is pot in something,”

said Diane Carlson of Smart Colorado, a parents’ group that encourages making marijuana-infused edible products more identifiable.

Other proposals to help consumers identify edible marijuana products more easily have failed. One suggestion to label all marijuana-infused edibles with a marijuana leaf design was rejected because of fear that the symbol could attract, rather than deter, children from consuming the products.

Supporters of the stop sign symbol believe that it sends a necessary warning to children and that the banning of the word “candy” would appropriately address consumer and parent concerns.

Other components of the newly proposed rules need further clarification, according to some edible marijuana manufacturers. One of the new rules would prohibit the use of premade edible items, such as using bulk candy purchased elsewhere and then coating it with cannabis oil. However, the rules would not ban using premade items if the items are made so unrecognizable that they no longer take on their original form, such as using ground-up cookies in a crust.

Several bans already exist in regard to marijuana edible packaging in the state. For example, edible manufacturers are banned from displaying cartoon characters on their packaging materials, and they may not create marijuana-infused products that look like widely recognized foods.

State regulators have until January to determine how to make edible marijuana products recognizable even outside of their packaging. In the meantime, state dispensaries have begun a “First Time 5” campaign to encourage first-time edible consumers to begin with a low, five-milligram dose to assess their tolerance.

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