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Rep. Jared Polis Criticizes Colorado Governor’s Marijuana Vetoes

Rep. Jared Polis Criticizes Colorado Governor’s Marijuana Vetoes

U.S. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO), who is running to be Colorado’s next governor, is calling out the incumbent over his decision to veto three pieces of marijuana legislation, including one bill that would have extended cannabis access to individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) struck down two other bills this week: one that would have allowed for increased investment in the state’s marijuana industry and another that would’ve allowed consumers to sample cannabis products at licensed dispensaries.

Because the legislative session ended last month, the Colorado General Assembly can’t override the vetoes. So it’ll be up to the next governor to bring the legislation back to life.

Polis, who is running for the seat and received an endorsement from NORML last month, hopes to do just that.

“If I have the opportunity to be governor of Colorado, I would sign this bill increasing access for medical marijuana to those on the autism spectrum, enabling investments in legal cannabis businesses that help reduce costs for consumers and create jobs,” Polis told Marijuana Moment in a phone interview.

“I think it’s commonsense.”

The congressman said that, beyond supporting state-level legislative efforts to improve Colorado’s marijuana program, he’d also resist the federal government should it attempt to interfere in the state’s legal system.

“I would make sure that we would not cooperate from the state-level and that state law enforcement resources were not used and information was not shared with any federal agent going after a legal, constitutionally protected Colorado activity.”

President Donald Trump reportedly voiced his support for federal legislation to protect states that legalize cannabis from federal interference in a conversation with Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) on Thursday.

But when it comes to the 2020 election, Polis said he hoped “we would have a forward-looking candidate for president that supports what the overwhelming majority of Colorado voters and American voters support, which is regulating marijuana more like alcohol, rather than continuing the failed drug war against marijuana.”

Following backlash from marijuana reform advocates over his veto of the autism medical marijuana bill, Hickenlooper directed his lieutenant governor to sign an executive order that called for research into the “safety and efficacy of medical marijuana for the treatment of autism spectrum disorders in children,” according to a press release.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Rep. Jared Polis Criticizes Colorado Governor’s Marijuana Vetoes

Congress Considers Three Hemp Amendments To Farm Bill

Congress Considers Three Hemp Amendments To Farm Bill

 A bipartisan group of congressional lawmakers submitted three far-reaching cannabis amendments to a House agricultural bill on Friday. Two of the measures would legalize hemp, a non-psychoactive cousin of marijuana, and another would allow banks to provide financial services to hemp businesses.

The first, introduced by Reps. Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Jared Polis (D-CO), would remove hemp from the list of federally banned substances.

A second measure, submitted by Reps. James Comer (R-KY) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), along with Polis, would also legalize hemp in an approach similar to pending legislation recently filed in the Senate by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY).

Another proposal, submitted by Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY), seeks to amend the pending Farm Bill by creating “a safe harbor for financial institutions that provide services to hemp legitimate businesses” that operate under state-authorized research programs in accordance with the provisions of an earlier version of the Farm Bill that was enacted in 2014.

The House members’ amendments will be put up for consideration by the body’s Rules Committee next week; but that panel is headed by chairman Pete Sessions (R-TX), who has routinely declined to allow floor votes on cannabis-related measures. Whether or not Sessions clears the cannabis measures for consideration, the overall Farm Bill is expected to go before the full House later next week.

McConnell’s stepped up push for hemp legalization could spur his party colleagues in the other chamber to allow one or more of the amendments to move forward. But even if House action does not occur, cannabis provisions could still make it into the final version of the Farm Bill. That’s because the Senate majority leader has already said he intends to insert the text of his standalone hemp bill into his chamber’s version of the legislation this month. That means the language would be up for consideration by the bicameral conference committee that later merges the House and Senate bills into one proposal to be sent to President Trump.

In 2014, McConnell successfully attached language to prevent federal interference in hemp research in that year/s version of the Farm Bill.

“Who knows how big it could be,” McConnell said in an interview last month, referring to the economic potential of hemp for rural states. “Tobacco was awfully big. I don’t know whether it could be that big or not. But there won’t be an argument about whether it’s not good for you.”

“The momentum for hemp farming is growing fast and has great potential to generate job and economic development,” Eric Steenstra, president of Vote Hemp, told Marijuana Moment in an email. “The three proposed hemp amendments to the Farm Bill will help advance the industry and we strongly support them.”

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Congress Considers Three Hemp Amendments To Farm Bill

 

Multiple Marijuana Related Amendments Introduced in U.S. House

Multiple Marijuana Related Amendments Introduced in U.S. House

Several marijuana-related amendments were introduced in the U.S. House on Wednesday, June 3. Some of the proposed amendments aimed to impact the Department of Justice (DOJ) and handicap their enforcement on local marijuana laws.

The amendments were presented as part of the funding bill which determines how the DOJ is able to spend money. Cannabis advocates both in and outside of the federal government are making a strong effort to educate and sway lawmakers.

One such advocate, Tom Angell, chairman of the Marijuana Majority, believes this is the time to bring members of the government to their side:

“The politics have continued to shift in favor of marijuana law reform. For a long time, lawmakers treated marijuana as a third-rail issue that was too dangerous to touch. But now that polling shows a growing majority of voters supports ending prohibition, more and more elected officials are starting to realize that demonstrating leadership on this issue has political benefits instead of harms.”

An amendment introduced by Reps. Dana Rohrabacher (R) and Sam Farr (D) forbids the DOJ from using federal funds to impede on states’ medical marijuana laws. This measure was approved in 2014, but must be renewed when the Justice Department’s spending bill expires each year. On Wednesday, it was approved again by a vote of 242-186. This is a significant increase from 2014 when the vote was 219-189.

Tom Angell, Chairman of the Marijuana Majority, commented on the increased support from lawmakers:

“Now that the House has gone on record with strong bipartisan votes for two years in a row to oppose using federal funds to interfere with state medical marijuana laws, it’s time for Congress to take up comprehensive legislation to actually change federal law. That’s what a growing majority of Americans wants, and these votes show that lawmakers are on board as well. Congress clearly wants to stop the the Justice Department from spending money to impose failed marijuana prohibition policies onto states, so there’s absolutely no reason those policies themselves should remain on the lawbooks any longer.”

The amendment from Reps. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.) and Jared Polis (D-Colo.) was pushing for even more than just impacting state medical laws. It would have denied the DOJ the ability to use federal funds to interfere with state laws allowing recreational marijuana use. This amendment was defeated, however, by a vote of 206-222.

Still, drug policy reform in the United States is shifting for the better, and funding is being reallocated to benefit citizens of the United States. Three other amendments, combined, significantly reduced the budget of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Those funds were reallocated to such subjects as solving the rape kit testing backlog, helping child abuse victims and paying for police body cameras.

Tom Angell commented on this in an email to Whaxy:

“Almost anything would be a more effective use of taxpayer resources than paying DEA agents to arrest people for marijuana. Thanks to these amendments that succeeded in swiftly cutting $23 million from the drug agency in about 10 minutes of floor time, this money will be used for things that actually help people instead of being used to ruin people’s lives for no good reason.”

Another win on Wednesday was sponsored by Rep. Suzanne Bonamici (D-Ore.). She presented an amendment to protect state hemp laws from the DOJ. In another increase in support from lawmakers over last year, it was approved by a vote of 282-146.

This will assist farmers in the movement towards legal hemp cultivation in the United States. Hemp originates from the same plant as cannabis, but does not offer the intoxicating feeling. It is used around the world to make materials such as paper, rope, and cloth.

The increase in support of cannabis policy reform by United States lawmakers in just one year, from 2014 to 2015, is a sign of hope for continued progress in the future.

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