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Poll: Majority of Americans Want Feds to Stay Out of Legal Marijuana

Poll: Majority of Americans Want Feds to Stay Out of Legal Marijuana

A recent poll conducted by Quinnipiac University revealed that the vast majority of Americans support legal cannabis – a particularly significant finding given the current political climate and federal government’s contrasting opinion on the topic.

The poll, released in February, revealed that 71 percent of voters believe the following:

“The government should not enforce federal laws against marijuana in states that have legalized medical or recreational marijuana use.”

The most interesting part of this statistic? Voters in every age group and political affiliation reported this opinion; it seems that these days the support for legalizing cannabis crosses party lines and all age gaps.

To add more fuel to the fire of cannabis reform, this poll dug even deeper into voters’ opinions on cannabis, producing a key statistic on the current cannabis climate in the United States. When asked if marijuana should be made legal (not just medical marijuana – all marijuana uses, in every state), 59 percent of voters were in support. That means that the majority of Americans are now in support of fully legalized cannabis. While only 41 percent of voters identifying as Republicans and 49 percent of voters over the age of 65 were in support, this is still a huge vote of confidence for the general American climate on cannabis.

However, this majority opinion didn’t develop overnight. Let’s delve into the significance of this particular poll result by looking at the very recent history of American opinion on cannabis regulation.

Currently, according to the February 2017 Quinnipiac poll mentioned above, American support of legalized cannabis is at 59 percent. Another poll by the General Social Survey reports that number as 60 percent, so the support of cannabis right now in the United States seems to lie right in that 59-60 percent range. However, just 11 years ago in 2006, only 35 percent of American voters were in support of legalizing cannabis. This is a huge change in such a short time, making the current percentage of Americans supporting legalized cannabis even more impressive.

This General Social Survey, similar to the Quinnipiac poll, also looked at voters’ political stance, age, race, and gender. The survey revealed that, while support ratings were lower among Republicans and in older age groups, overall the support in every demographic and political group was up compared to the percentages recorded years ago. An upward trend is a positive trend, and it is obvious that support for legalized cannabis is on the rise.

Unfortunately, the federal government does not seem to follow this upward trend. Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently restated his opinion on cannabis; he reported in no uncertain terms that he intends to enforce federal regulations on cannabis, and that he does not agree with legalization. This is unsettling news to many in the cannabis industry with lives and savings deeply invested into their businesses, which are legal in their home states but, technically, still illegal on the federal level. However, with the rate at which the cannabis industry is creating jobs and stimulating the economy – predicted to be as many as 250,000 by 2020 – combined with the ever-increasing positive public perception of cannabis, it seems to be in the government’s best interests to reconsider its stance.

Overall, the current American public climate towards legalizing cannabis is very positive, and it is only getting better. Just since 2016, the overall support for legal cannabis has increased from 57 percent to 59-60 percent, reflecting a public eager for change and for more progressive legislation. Hopefully the federal government, while several steps behind this ever-supportive public opinion on cannabis, will come to recognize and address the needs of its constituency. With increasing support every year, it can only be a matter of time before voters are able to instigate change with their voices and with their votes. Legal cannabis is on the forefront of political hot topics, and change is on the horizon.

New Jersey Firefighter Suspended for Using Medical Marijuana Battles State

New Jersey Firefighter Suspended for Using Medical Marijuana Battles State

Registered medical marijuana patient and New Jersey firefighter Donald Wiltshire has been suspended from his job October 9, 2015 for using medical marijuana to treat his Meige syndrome medical condition. Now, he’s mired in a fiery fight with his former employer.

The Ocean City resident Wiltshire and his attorneys filed a civil lawsuit against the city in February to attempt to gain Wiltshire relief and get him his job back. A judge recently rejected this civil suit, stating that Wiltshire must “exhaust the administrative process” before he can sue the state.

New Jersey is a medical marijuana state so Wiltshire’s use was legal by state law–but apparently didn’t jive with his chief’s personal opinion on cannabis. Thus, a firefighter for 20 years was suspended last fall after he notified his police chief that he was using and needed to use medical marijuana to treat his condition.

That lawsuit appears imminent and will be an interesting one to keep an eye on. Wiltshire’s time as a firefighter may very well be done, but he’s en route to becoming a symbol for medical marijuana employees in New Jersey and beyond.

That condition, Meidge syndrome, is a “rare neurological movement disorder characterized by involuntary and often forceful contractions of the muscles of the jaw and tongue and involuntary muscle spasms.” Cannabis and cannabidiol oil (CBD) can help alleviate that type of pain and make working with that type of pain far more bearable.

Now, there’s a stalemate and an impending lawsuit between Wiltshire and Ocean City. The defendant, Ocean City, must prove that Wiltshire’s use was impairing his ability to perform his job. However, New Jersey’s law does not protect Wiltshire, and the ruling judge could ultimately decide that, as Ocean City Attorney Dorothy McCrosson hopes,

Wiltshire’s use of medical marijuana may be legal in New Jersey, but the law “does not bestow upon him a statutory right to continue to serve as a firefighter while he is using it,”

Ironically, Wiltshire replaced his Kolonopin prescription with cannabis because the prescription drug was making him tired on the job. The defense is also stating that his failure to disclose his Kolonopin use nullifies his claim.

If the following statement from presiding Judge Gibson of the Cape May County Superior Court is any indication, Wiltshire should ultimately have his day in court–and could win. Gibson believes

that the purpose of the 2010 New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act is to protect patients from penalties for the use of medicinal marijuana.

If that’s the case, then Wiltshire should be seeing green–the dollar bill kind–if and when this case goes to court.

Bernie Canter

Premier Cannabis Industry Job Fair Coming to San Francisco

Premier Cannabis Industry Job Fair Coming to San Francisco

In 2015, the cannabis force awakened by turning into a $5 billion+ industry with legal recreational markets in four states and medical retail markets in nearly half. With this rising national force has come an inherent rise in marijuana industry jobs.

From cultivators to lawyers and budtenders to accountants, cannabis businesses are recruiting talented professionals more than ever before. Many job seekers, however, are met with a consistent dilemma: where do I even go to look for a job in the cannabis industry?

Fortunately, GreenRush has stepped up to the plate to organize “Join the GreenRush“, the nation’s premier cannabis job fair in San Francisco. Taking place on April 30, 2016 from 10am-6pm at the Regency Ballroom, this job fair will link industry hopefuls with major cannabis companies that are actively seeking qualified candidates.

Join the GreenRush is more than just a job fair, it’s a celebration.

“As a one year celebration of the company we wanted to do something to bring the industry together and connect great talent to great businesses,”

explained GreenRush’s CEO, Paul Warshaw.

“Thats how this idea was born.”

The best part about the JoinTheGreenRush Event? It’s free to job seekers! For a limited time, click here to get your ticket to Join the GreenRush, then enter promo code “WHAXY”, and you will have tickets to the event free of charge.

Attendees must be 18+ with a valid ID to attend, and professional attire is recommended. Bring copies of your resume and business cards. If you do not have a medical recommendation, you can get your recommendation for just $39 from RushMD.

Thereafter, you’ll have access to the growing force that is the California cannabis industry. JoinTheGreenRush has over 200 dispensary partners and a massive marijuana network that includes eCann Media, Eastbay Express, SF Weekly, Smell The Truth, CCIA, CANORML, Stokes Confections, Oasis, Culture Magazine, The Hash, HelloMD, Oaksterdam University, GreenRush and many more!

If you’re located in or near the Bay Area, you’d be doing your future a disservice not to attend JoinTheGreenRush on April 30 in San Francisco at the Regency Ballroom.

Bernie Canter

The Smell of My Success

The Smell of My Success

To the uninitiated it can come as a surprise that so many professionals both in and out of the cannabis space are of the “all day, everyday” persuasion. Either freely imbibing or secretly getting stoned throughout the day, the results are the same; shit gets done. We’re not a giggly bunch who just took our first hit out of an apple or pop can. Cannabis use isn’t detrimental or an impediment but rather the differentiating factor in our discovery of successes previously thought to be unattainable.

In the face of a changing nation where dabs are the new crack and Pulitzer Prize winners are convinced they have died after eating too much edibles, the modern cannabis enthusiast walks a fine line from budroom to boardroom.

The corporate world of serviced offices, local amenities and daily human interaction is more palatable and less stressful after a few deep breaths of your favorite strain. Multiple visits to a parking structure, alley, balcony or unoccupied floor throughout the day are best to keep workplace incidents to a minimum and morale high.

For even the lucky few whose professions encourage and call for a love of cannabis to be unabashed, totally biased and in your face, cohabitation with those who deem our lifestyle an abomination is unavoidable. Generally speaking, their opinions are informed by the uniformed. Their interest in our cannabis use is a clever way in that they make themselves feel superior to you. Continue to indulge them; it’s their best source of education.

Similar to the notion that kicking somebodies teeth in on your first day in prison is the best way to let fellow inmates know you’re not to be trifled with on the yard, it is necessary to navigate the office with disregard for authority, order and the status quo. The days of covering up the residual olfactory bliss after puffing a cone of Ghost Train Haze are over. Waft in it and walk around to everybody’s personal space. Get the workplace used to the smell of success.

The aroma of expertly grown properly flushed and perfectly cured bud is no more offensive than the microwaved leftovers of an ethnically diverse floor of cigarette smokers.

how-to-get-a-job-in-cannabis-industry (2)

Impressing upon the many chuckleheads you encounter the benefits of medicated working as they slug down their umpteenth coffee of the morning is a tiring exercise but it strengthens your resolve against those dunces that adhere to only “normal” conventions. To be a boss, you’ve got to act like a boss. Suffer no fools and make no excuses for yourself!

It’s easy to sniff out the office narc(s). Pleated trousers and blazers with shoulder pads may serve to identify critics. Their passive aggression is palpable and inviting. At the expense of etiquette, it is practical to maintain a presence among the confidants of your detractors. Provided adeptness at winning friends and influencing people, there shouldn’t be a problem infiltrating the office social circle of the staunchest cannabis prohibitionists.

Working amongst those of the “straight world” persuasion can be a learning experience for cannabis enthusiasts too. Regular interface with that which we are unaccustomed delivers the opportunity to develop and hone skills that might otherwise not be fostered.

It is hard to maintain a look of indifference when somebody is crying their eyes out or screaming at the top of their lungs right in your doorway. Largely untaught in business school and MBA programs, acquiring statuesque tendencies benefits both self and organization alike. An unbothered expression is worth more than the litany of cost cutting expenses serving as justifications for improving the bottom line.

Cannabis consumption provides the user an ability to make observations and contemplate choices in ways that the tethered mind cannot comprehend. It is an important business tool. It allows its possessor the ability to look at situations from other’s perspectives and consider different points of view opposed to making rash decisions. A quick puff or dab sure beats the hell out of the three-martini-lunch when charting the course of history.

Working while stoned, mundane tasks become exciting and double-checking your work is second nature. As your awareness is strengthened, doing a better job than someone who doesn’t use cannabis motivates many to soar to great heights.

This is the new normal. Make them get used to it.

Denver’s Weed Critic

Denver’s Weed Critic

Colorado’s recreational marijuana market has given rise to an important role of any consumer market: the critic. While bong smoking bros may have been arguing over strains between mouthfuls of Doritos for years, The Denver Post has elevated this role to a position more similar to a sommelier.

Jake Browne of Denver had a winding career path up until his new role as The Post’s Marijuana Critic. He first started dabbling in the weed business by helping a friend open a dispensary, managing the books. Browne went on to become the dispensary’s marketing director, then general manager. Soon after he started a blog and kicked off his own consulting business.

When The Cannabist’s Editor Ricardo Baca saw Browne’s resumé he was sold. Jake’s industry experience set him apart from what we would assume to be a mile-high stack of resumés for for the world’s most ideal stoner career. Browne has a distinguished palate and uses it to describe the most subtle of flavor differences between strains. He explains:

“In the same way that pinot grigio and pinot noir may sound similar but are completely different, names like Lemon OG and Lemon Skunk are very different strains with very different flavor components and completely different highs.”

Although Browne likes to give readers a well-crafted and detailed description of different flowers, he tries to avoid the pretentious and cliché connoisseur language. He writes for newbies and stoners alike, giving a lot of attention to smells, flavors, and effects, all the while looking for bugs, mildew, and other signs of inferior products.

Jake Browne Smoking Weed

As marijuana continues to filter into the mainstream, it’s certain that Jake won’t be the last of his kind. “I feel lucky to be this person in the middle of a historical moment, and I don’t think we’ll see anything really comparable to it,” told the New York Times. We think he’s right.

via New York Times

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