These 10 States Smoke The Most Weed

These 10 States Smoke The Most Weed

As the trend of marijuana decriminalization continues in America, so too do the amount of people willing to admit that they’ve taken a puff or two in the past. According to a 2013 Gallup Poll, about 38% of Americans say that they have tried marijuana in their lives.

Marijuana Use Graph

With more and more Americans willing to fess up to smoking, one begins to wonder where these smokers are dispersed throughout the country. According to a recent article, these states are rank among the highest for marijuana consumption per capita.

1. Alaska: Not who we expected to see at the top of the list. With over 68,000 people over 18 reporting marijuana use during in the past month, that means just over 13% of the Alaskan’s are lighting up. It’s a safe bet that this number will increase post-legalization.

2. Rhode Island: Another unlikely candidate for top stoner state. Just under 13% of Rhode Island’s small population said they’ve smoked in the last month.

3. Vermont: This nature-loving, organic, and hormone-free state is less of a surprise, but still beat out other states that have more progressive marijuana legislation.

4. Oregon: With new marijuana legislation in place, Oregon comes as no surprise as a weed-friendly state. Just over 12.4% of Oregonians have lighted up within the past 30 days. Now they’re doing it legally.

5. District of Columbia: We know it’s not a state, but DC ranks highly among places with high marijuana consumption. Over 10.5% of residents have smoked within the last calendar month.

6. Montana: Montana’s sparse population has some similarities to the freedom-loving, gun-toting state of Alaska. These states prize their personal liberties and smoking weed may be one of those liberties they enjoy most.

7. Colorado: The only surprise here is that Colorado wasn’t ranked higher. With tourists and residensts flocking to the state, it would come as no surprise to see CO jump up on the list in coming years.

8. Washington: Right behind Colorado both in legislation and consumption, this state will similarly keep it’s spot on this list. As WA begins to roll out retail locations, look for a bump in state consumption.

9. Massachusetts: Around 9.26% of these New Englanders say they use marijuana. The state is still working out their medical marijuana program and will likely continue to decriminalize in the next few years.

10. California: This state has an astounding 2.5 million marijuana users, but their population is similarly large. For a state that’s known for marijuana production and consumption, this came as the biggest surprise on the list.

U.N. Disapproves of Legal Cannabis in the U.S.

U.N. Disapproves of Legal Cannabis in the U.S.

Four of the United States and the District of Columbia are in violation of a United Nations drug policy. This week, executive director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Yury Fedotov, publicly scolded the United States for this offense. The Uruguayan government was scolded earlier this year when they became the first country to violate the treaty by legalizing cannabis throughout the entire country.

In 1961, seventy-three countries, including Uruguay and the United States under the Kennedy administration, agreed upon and signed an international drug treaty . The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs prohibits recreational cultivation, use and sale of certain drugs, like marijuana. It is not in violation of the convention if marijuana is cultivated, used or sold only for medical treatment and research. This means that legalizing cannabis for recreational use in four states and the District of Columbia is in violation of this fifty-three-year old treaty.

Fedotov told Reuters that this will be an important topic with the U.S. State Department and other United Nations agencies in Washington, next week, and explained,

“I don’t see how (the new laws) can be compatible with existing conventions.”

The states where voters legalized recreational marijuana are already violating their own nation’s federal law, so why not a United Nations treaty? This treaty is more than fifty years old, and much has been learned since the days of yore, when it was negotiated. Perhaps this will be a good jumping off point to reform the marijuana policies of the United Nations to better suite the views of the changing world.

photo credit: Carlos Gracia

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']