One In Four Young Americans Consume Marijuana, Survey Finds

One In Four Young Americans Consume Marijuana, Survey Finds

It turns out millennials are different than the rest of Americans: They like to smoke marijuana a lot more than the general public.

Nearly one in four Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 say they “regularly” or “occasionally” consume cannabis, according to a recent Gallup poll.

That’s nearly twice the rate of cannabis consumption than the rest of the population, 13 percent of which cops to using marijuana. And it far exceeds the percentage of adults 50 and over who say they toke up.

The survey also found that among all Americans, consuming cannabis is now considerably more popular than smoking cigars (9 percent), chewing tobacco (5 percent) or using a pipe (4 percent).

Americans aged between 50 and 64 and those 65 and over are just as likely to smoke cigars (6 percent) as they are to use cannabis (also 6 percent), according to the poll.

That’s despite a general acceptance of marijuana across age groups that’s been steadily growing for at least the past decade.

The same Gallup poll, in a separate release of results last month, found that 82 percent of Americans say that tobacco is harmful to human health, compared to just 27 percent who said they believed marijuana was threatening.

Eighteen percent of respondents said they believed marijuana wasn’t harmful at all.

These results are consistent with earlier polling that consistently finds young Americans’ attitudes are the most relaxed towards cannabis—or, possibly, they are the least inclined to fib about their marijuana habits to a stranger on the telephone.

Earlier Gallup polling in 2015 and 2017 found that 22 percent of 18 to 29-year-olds answered “yes” when asked whether or not they used marijuana.

Results are based on telephone interviews of 1,033 adults conducted between July 1 and July 11. The poll’s margin of error is plus-or-minus 4 percentage points.

The same poll also fund that 20 percent of Americans still regularly or occasionally smoke cigarettes.

Predictably, America’s marijuana consumers as a whole are concentrated in the West, where cannabis has been legal the longest—these days, it is the rare Western state that does not allow cannabis use in some form—and generally considered acceptable behavior in certain circles for even longer.

Women (11 percent) were less likely to be consume marijuana than men (15 percent).

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

One In Four Young Americans Consume Marijuana, Survey Finds

Congressman Pushes Federal Employment Protections For Marijuana Consumers

Congressman Pushes Federal Employment Protections For Marijuana Consumers

Drug testing policies for federal employees have gone largely unchanged over the past 30 years—and that’s created a conflict for individuals who chose to use marijuana in states that have legalized.

A bill introduced by Rep. Charlie Crist (D-FL) last month aims to resolve that conflict, though. In an effort to protect prospective federal job applicants and workers, the legislation would effectively prohibit employment discrimination against cannabis consumers living in legal states.

One of the primary goals of the legislation is to protect veterans, who comprise about one-third of the federal workforce.

“I think it’s an issue of fairness, and it’s always been, for me, an issue also of compassion,” Crist said at roundtable event about the bill on Wednesday, which involved veterans and members of Florida’s cannabis industry.

https://www.facebook.com/RepCharlieCrist/videos/1322716064526218/

“Medical marijuana is an issue of compassion, and in the veterans’ community, access is even more important as more and more veterans are turning to cannabis to address chronic pain and PTSD,” Crist said. “At the same time, the federal government is the largest employer of veterans; however, private cannabis use even in states that have legalized medical marijuana is prohibited in these positions.”

Veterans are more likely than the general population to use cannabis as a treatment option for conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder or chronic pain.

“We appreciate your bipartisan leadership on this issue because it is so essential,” Veterans Cannabis Coalition founder Eric Goepel wrote in a letter of support for the legislation. “Self-care and gainful employment are critical components of life-long success for not just veterans but all Americans.”

“For the federal government to essentially punish citizens, who are under the protection of their state laws, for exercising their right to care for themselves is an affront to personal liberty.”

Cosponsoring the new bill with Crist is Rep. Drew Ferguson (R-GA).

“American workers are reaping the benefits of our growing economy, but some workers are finding themselves caught between federal and state laws governing medical marijuana use,” Ferguson said in a press release. “No one should face unemployment for choosing to pursue private legal medical treatment.”

As the law currently works, veterans and others who seek federal employment can be turned away if they test positive for marijuana metabolites. That’s left many with an uncomfortable choice: stop using marijuana even if it’s proven therapeutic or continuing using and miss out on potential job opportunities.

“The time for the federal government to end the practice of arbitrarily discriminating against current and potential workers for marijuana consumption is now,” NORML political director Justin Strekal said in a press release. “With 47 states having reformed their cannabis laws to be in direct conflict with the federal Controlled Substances Act, individuals acting in compliance with state law should not be denied the opportunity to serve their country as public servants.”

Though exact numbers are hard to come by, earlier reports show that employers in the federal government are at least aware of the problem. In 2014, former FBI director James Comey publicly voiced concerns that the agency’s drug testing policy could complicate recruitment efforts, for example.

“I have to hire a great work force to compete with those cybercriminals, and some of those kids want to smoke weed on the way to the interview,” Comey said at the time.

Crist’s Fairness in Federal Drug Testing Under State Laws Act would not take away an employer’s right to issue probable cause drug tests when a worker is suspected of on-the-job impairment. It also makes an exemption for “individuals occupying or seeking a position requiring a top-secret clearance.”

Several states have either passed or attempted to pass laws that similarly prevent employment discrimination against marijuana users in legal states, according to NORML. That list includes states like California, Wisconsin, Florida and New Jersey.

But with cannabis still strictly banned under federal law, Crist’s bill seeks to stop employment discrimination at executive branch agencies, getting ahead of the curve to ensure that legal consumers aren’t forced to choose between treatment and gainful employment.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Congressman Pushes Federal Employment Protections For Marijuana Consumers

Almost One-Fifth Of California Consumers Still Buying Illegal-Market Marijuana, Report Finds

Almost One-Fifth Of California Consumers Still Buying Illegal-Market Marijuana, Report Finds

California’s experiment with marijuana legalization is proving extremely popular, but high taxes mean consumers still have a robust appetite for criminal-market cannabis, a new industry report claims.

Eighty-four percent of Californians say they are “very satisfied” with the legal market. However, 18 percent of California marijuana consumers bought cannabis from an unlicensed business or supplier in the last three months, according to the analysis, and say they will do so again as long as taxes remain high.

The report, “The High Cost of Legal Cannabis,” was published on Wednesday by Eaze, a San Francisco-based software company that facilitates marijuana deliveries.

It is also the first such analysis to be published following disappointing, lower-than-expected sales figures in the first few months of California’s legalization era.

California voters legalized recreational marijuana for adults 21 and over on Election Day 2016, and sales at licensed retail outlets began on January 1, 2018.

Earlier this year, Gov. Jerry Brown (D) estimated that excise tax revenue from marijuana sales would total $175 million. The state collected $34 million in excise tax revenue during the first quarter of 2018, leading the state Legislative Analyst Office to predict a lower haul for the year.

With sales and cultivation taxes included, the state collected $60.9 million in marijuana-related tax revenue through the first quarter of 2018, the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration reported in May.

Marijuana purchases in the state are subject to a 15 percent excise tax as well as state sales taxes. Localities like cities and counties can also apply a local tax. With these, on top of a $9.25-per-ounce cultivation tax, taxes on legal cannabis in the state can reach 40 percent or more—the highest in the United States.

And most cities in the state ban commercial marijuana sales outright. According to the San Jose Mercury News, retail cannabis sales are allowed in only one out of every seven cities.

“High prices, taxes, and lack of access to legal cannabis continues to fuel a thriving illicit market,” the Eaze report’s executive summary says. “Simply stated, California has done a good job of telling consumers that cannabis is legal but has a long way to go in making it easy to get safe, legal and affordable cannabis.”

Other findings in Eaze report include:

*Reducing cannabis taxes by 5 percent “could drive 23 percent of illicit market supporters into the legal market.”

*Properly labeled and tested cannabis is popular with 85 and 75 percent of consumers, respectively.

*The most common consumer complaints were high taxes (47 percent), the inability to use credit or debit cards for payment (36 percent) and overpriced products (32 percent).

*The average cannabis user in California is 38 years old. Eighty-five percent of Eaze users are college-educated, and 33 percent are parents.

*And nine out of 10 marijuana consumers say that cannabis has a medical application.

Eaze’s analysis was based on 1,750 online surveys submitted by its users between July 6 and July 12.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Almost One-Fifth Of California Consumers Still Buying Illegal-Market Marijuana, Report Finds

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']