Marijuana-Friendly Gubernatorial Candidates Win Big In Tuesday’s Primaries

Marijuana-Friendly Gubernatorial Candidates Win Big In Tuesday’s Primaries

It was another big day for the marijuana legalization movement on Tuesday.

Voters in three out of four states that held primary elections nominated vocally pro-legalization Democratic candidates for governor.

From Vermont to Minnesota, all but one of the new Democratic gubernatorial nominees has gone on the record endorsing adult-use marijuana systems, and the fourth at least supports decriminalization and medical cannabis and wants a referendum on more broadly ending prohibition. As debates over the best direction for the party continue, it’s become increasingly apparent that cannabis reform is a winning issue for Democrats across the country.

Connecticut

Turning to Connecticut, Democratic gubernatorial nominee Ned Lamont has called for a system to tax and regulate cannabis. Speaking at a senior living facility in July, the businessman and politician said legalization is “an idea whose time has come.”

Another resident of the facility chimed in, The CT Mirror reported: “And it’s not bad for you!” Lamont went on to tell the audience that marijuana is “not a gateway drug compared to opioids” and that he’d use revenue from a regulated system to fund opioid treatment programs in the state.

On the Republican side, Bob Stefanowski won the party’s gubernatorial nomination. At the final Republican primary debate earlier this month, the then-candidate admitted that he’s used cannabis—but he said more research was needed before the state, which already has medical cannabis and marijuana decriminalization, legalizes for adult-use.

Minnesota

Minnesota’s Democratic gubernatorial nominee, Rep. Tim Walz (D-MN), also ran on a pro-legalization platform. The state’s current marijuana policy has “failed,” and he pledged to implement a recreational cannabis system that “creates tax revenue, grows jobs, builds opportunities for Minnesotans, protects Minnesota kids, and trusts adults to make personal decisions based on their personal freedoms.”

During his time in Congress, Walz repeatedly raised the issue of legal access to cannabis for veterans.

Walz opponent, Republican gubernatorial primary winner Jeff Johnson, doesn’t back an adult-use system. In an interview with Minnesota Public Radio last month, Johnson said he remained concerned about the impact of legalization on “work productivity, safety on the roadways and reproductive health.”

Vermont

In Vermont, Christine Hallquist became the first transgender candidate to win a major party gubernatorial nomination. She told Heady Vermont that she’d “work with the legislature to ensure that a tax and regulate system was passed into law in my first term” in an interview earlier this month.

“I think that enough research has been done and enough systems implemented that I don’t really feel the need to dictate a specific system,” Hallquist said. “Rather, I believe it would be my job to work collaboratively with all stakeholders—legislators, interest groups, et cetera—to make sure the system is a reality.”

Hallquist will face off against incumbent governor, Phil Scott (R), who said he signed a law allowing adults 21 and older to possess and cultivate cannabis in January with “mixed feelings.” He’s since expressed reservations about expanding the state’s marijuana system, saying “[w]e’re not ready, I don’t believe, for a tax-and-regulate system at this point in time.”

He said the state wouldn’t be ready for legal cannabis sales until it addressed issues related to education, mental health and impaired driving on highways.

Wisconsin

The outlier in Tuesday’s primary race—at least when it comes to full legalization—was Wisconsin’s Democratic gubernatorial nominee, Tony Evers. He was the only major Democratic candidate for governor that didn’t back legalization, saying he’d like to see a state referendum on the issue first.

(Numerous counties in Wisconsin will vote on non-binding advisory questions about legalization in November—a move that may bolster lawmakers and whoever is elected governor to take marijuana reform seriously in 2019).

In February,Evers responded to a tweet saying that he’d push for decriminalizing marijuana possession as a means of improving living conditions for marginalized groups in the state.

Evers’s campaign website notes that he supports legalizing marijuana for medical use in Wisconsin.

“Tony believes it’s time for Wisconsin to join nearly 30 other states and the District of Columbia in legalizing medical marijuana. As a cancer survivor himself, Tony is all too familiar with the side effects of a major illness that can make everyday tasks, like making your bed or even showering, a challenge.”

The incumbent governor, Scott Walker, clinched the Republican nomination on Tuesday. He’s consistently opposed cannabis legalization for both medical and recreational purposes, and he believes that marijuana is a gateway drug.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Marijuana-Friendly Gubernatorial Candidates Win Big In Tuesday’s Primaries

Photo by Drew Taylor on Unsplash

Here Are The Most And Least Marijuana-Friendly Newspapers, According To Science

Here Are The Most And Least Marijuana-Friendly Newspapers, According To Science

Newspapers have generally treated marijuana with a neutral, unbiased attitude, according to new research. But the report, which examined how the press covers cannabis, also revealed which publications have been the most and least weed-friendly.

The study, published in the journal Preventative Medicine Reports, analyzed 640 marijuana-related articles across a variety of national and regional newspapers from 1995 to 2014. While the intent of the study was to demonstrate how media coverage of certain issues relates to public opinion, it also showed just how positively, neutrally or negatively mainstream papers have reported on marijuana.

Here’s the percentage of marijuana stories with “positive” tones in ten newspapers.

  • The Columbus Dispatch: 37.1%
  • The New York Times: 37%
  • The Seattle Times: 35.8%
  • The Washington Post: 32.4%
  • The San Francisco Chronicle: 31.9%
  • Tulsa World: 28.2%
  • The Tampa Tribune: 21.5%
  • The Dallas Morning News: 21.2%
  • The Wall Street Journal: 17.4%
  • The Denver Post: 13.8%

It might come as a surprise that a paper based in Colorado, one of the first states to legalize recreational marijuana, would have a lower percentage of positive cannabis stories than papers in Texas and Oklahoma—or that Ohio’s Columbus Dispatch would come out on top—but bear in mind that the study’s analysis cutoff was 2014. A lot has happened on the cannabis news front over the past four years, including the rollout and expansion of the legal industry and media coverage of the subject.

Still, the researchers made several other significant findings. Perhaps one of the more obvious is that liberal-leaning papers tended to approach marijuana stories with a more positive tone compared to conservative-leaning competitors.

But when it comes to how marijuana news stories have been framed over the years, things get more interesting.

“Media frames suggest how the public can interpret an issue or event, and framing involves selection and salience,” the researchers wrote. “Thus, news framing can influence the public’s perception about public health policy including marijuana legalization.”

The team categorized story framing according to six “organizing themes.” Those themes are: legislation, law enforcement, youth drug use, economy, patients and medical effects.

As a general rule, drug-related stories have typically been reported through a law enforcement perspective. Historically, marijuana has been no different. But starting shortly after President Barack Obama’s second term in office, cannabis stories dealing with legislation surpassed those framed around law enforcement.

The study also demonstrated that interest in cannabis stories centered around the economy started picking up dramatically beginning in President George W. Bush’s second term, outpacing those framed around “patients” or “medical effects.”

Why this study matters.

“Although researchers have paid little attention to systematically analyzing marijuana legalization stories, there are a growing number of studies that assess the various impacts on marijuana legalization that have been published in recent years,” the authors wrote. “This study can provide useful information for practical implications. Research on the framing of marijuana legalization is important, as the way in which this issue is framed can change or shape public opinion.”

Though research supports that idea that the way issues are framed in media reports can influence public opinion on those issues, it’s also true that the study found the number of stories with a positive tone toward marijuana has declined since Bush’s second term, while stories with a negative tone have increased.

Support for marijuana legalization, by contrast, has steadily increased. One recent survey from YouGov found that a record 68 percent of Americans favor full marijuana legalization.

Marijuana Use Is More Moral Than Porn, Death Penalty and Cloning, Americans Say

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Here Are The Most And Least Marijuana-Friendly Newspapers, According To Science

High Urban Hikes Denver Review

High Urban Hikes Denver Review

Walking tours, showcasing art, history, scenery and more, have long been a tourism staple in major cities throughout the world. Although some may see these types of tours as stale, one company in Denver, Colorado has found a way to bring this classic form of tourism into the new age by encouraging participants to add a little pep to their step.

High Urban Hikes (HUH) adds a cannabis-friendly twist to the old-school classic walking tour.

denver high urban hikes

In a city filled with beautiful public art exhibits and historic buildings, HUH encourages participants to consume cannabis before the tour begins in order to offer a new dimension to the tour that isn’t legally an option in most states.

Founded by Amy Rohrer and her son Kevin, HUH walking tours take you on a journey throughout downtown Denver, giving insight into the art, history, and unique landmarks of the city.

HUH will offer at least three different tour options throughout the summer, including the “Pot is Patriotic Tour” kicking off July 4th weekend.

Amy, who serves as the tour guide for HUH, is an energetic, kind and knowledgable leader who aims to keep the experience fun and informative. Amy maintains the fun and exciting vibe of the tour by by offering gift bags to guests who can answer questions or those assist her in different roles to keep the group organized.

Tour participants can expect to be surprised by just how much of Denver can be seen in such a short amount of time. It is important to remember to wear comfortable walking shoes and appropriate clothing for the weather. Also, bring a smile and be prepared to have a great time!

Although it is a tour that embraces cannabis use, the positive energy that Amy offers and the interesting sights make it a great tour for non-users as well. The opportunity to converse with open, interesting people being mutually led by a energetic guide makes HUH a great experience for everyone.

Visit www.huhdenver.com to book your tour. You’ll be glad you did!

high urban hikes denver review

high urban hike denver review

high urban hikes denver

high urban hikes denver review 1

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