100,000 Signed a Petition for Legal Marijuana in Nevada

100,000 Signed a Petition for Legal Marijuana in Nevada

Marijuana advocates in Nevada collected over one hundred thousand signatures on a petition supporting a measure to legalize recreational marijuana in the state. The signatures had to be turned in by the middle of November in order to be considered for Nevada’s legislature session beginning in January 2015.

State Senator Richard Segerblom told KNPR News that The Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol was responsible for collecting that many signatures, and it cost the organization $500,000 to get them. In the same interview, Senator Sergerblom stated,

“If the Legislature fails to approve the measure, it automatically goes on the ballot as a question for voters to decide in 2016.”

The only fear about the movement that was expressed, during the interview, by Councilman Bob Coffin was that medical marijuana dispensaries will be at a competitive disadvantage if recreational marijuana sales are legalized in the state. He is worried about existing businesses.

The measure would allow the cultivation, sale, taxation and regulation of cannabis to adults aged twenty one and older. It will also permit of-age adults to have up to one ounce of cannabis on their person at a time. The plan is for the tax revenue collected from legal recreational sales to go toward education in the state of Nevada. The tax rate for retail marijuana sales would not be increased. It would remain the same tax rate as that of other industries.

Whether recreational marijuana sales are legalized in the state in 2015 or the year after, it looks like residents are in support of it happening. It will be a huge source of tax revenue for the state, especially with the number of tourists that visit Las Vegas every year.

photo credit: beforeyoubackpack.com

Marijuana Law Reform Bills Are Being Drafted in Texas

Marijuana Law Reform Bills Are Being Drafted in Texas

Texans may see marijuana legalized for medical and/or recreational use in the near future. At the very least, the possession of marijuana for personal use will most likely be decriminalized thanks to the hard work of the Marijuana Policy Project in the Lone Star State.

The three bills being drafted are:

  • Civil Penalty Bill
  • Medical Marijuana Bill
  • Free Market or Tax and Regulate Bill

The Civil Penalty Bill decriminalizes adult possession of any amount of marijuana that is less than one ounce. Possessing the plant will still be illegal, but the bill significantly lessens the punishment to fit the “crime.” Amounts less than once ounce would only result in a civil penalty fine up to $100, rather than the possibility of jail time and harsher life repercussions associated with pot offenses, like losing a job or student aid.

The Medical Marijuana Bill would allow patients with physician recommendations, for the use of medical marijuana to treat one of the qualifying medical conditions, to possess up to two-and-one-half ounces of marijuana without legal penalty. Patients would also be permitted to cultivate their own medicine in a secure location. This bill also protects recommending physicians from punishment for recommending a patient use marijuana for medicinal purposes. This bill opens the door for medical marijuana dispensaries to cultivate and sell their product to qualifying patients with the stipulation that all products are lab tested. Caregivers for the seriously ill are also permitted under the Medical Marijuana Bill.

Under the Free Market Bill, marijuana use and possession for adults aged twenty-one years and over will be legal. It would be taxed and regulated in the same manner as alcohol. This bill allows retail marijuana shops to cultivate and sell lab tested products to anyone over the age of twenty-one, much like they do in Washington and Colorado. The bill allows for the local government to establish more specific regulations. Driving under the influence of cannabis will not be permitted under the Free Market Bill.

Heather Fazio is the Marijuana Policy Project political director in Texas. She told the Houston Press that the plan is to pre-file the three bills next month, November 2014, to get ahead of the 84th Texas Legislative Session beginning in January.

photo credit: prensa420

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