Key Mexican Senator Introduces Bill To Legalize Marijuana Sales

Key Mexican Senator Introduces Bill To Legalize Marijuana Sales

A senator from Mexico’s ruling party who will soon be a key member of the incoming president’s cabinet filed a bill to legalize marijuana production and sales on Tuesday.

The move comes less than one week after the Mexican Supreme Court struck down the country’s criminalization of cannabis use and possession as unconstitutional.

Under the proposed General Law for the Regulation and Control of Marijuana, introduced by Olga Sánchez Cordero, a senator who is expected to become interior secretary in the government of President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador, it would be legal to use, possess, cultivate and sell of cannabis, subject to regulations.

The legislation would create a new Institute for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis under the country’s Ministry of Health, which would issue licenses and permits for marijuana cultivation, harvesting, transportation, processing and sales.

Individuals would be allow to grow up to 20 mature cannabis plants for personal consumption on private property. They would be limited to producing 480 grams of marijuana per year, and would have to register plants with regulators.

People who require greater amounts of cannabis for medical use would be able to request permits.

Selling or giving marijuana products to people under the age of 18 would be prohibited.

Last month, Sánchez and other members of López Obrador’s incoming cabinet discussed legalizing cannabis with Canadian government officials on a trip to that country, which ended prohibition of cannabis on October 17.

López Obrador takes office as president on December 1.

Meanwhile, several U.S states are voting on marijuana ballot measures on Tuesday.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Key Mexican Senator Introduces Bill To Legalize Marijuana Sales

Mexico to Hold Groundbreaking Cannabis Debates

Mexico to Hold Groundbreaking Cannabis Debates

Mexico has opened a national debate on its cannabis laws, signaling a possible shift on the issue and an end to the country’s prohibitionist laws on the substance.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto called for the formation of five public debates on the issue, following an openness by the country’s supreme court to the legalization of recreational cannabis.

“This is an issue that has directly or indirectly affected the lives of millions of Mexicans,”

said the country’s interior minister, Miguel Angel Osorio Chong,  at the first debate.

“Such a delicate issue cannot be left to improvisation.”

While Pena Nieto rejected the argument that the legalization of recreational cannabis would strip drug cartels of a major source of their income –a notion that has been put forward by many advocates of legalization– he nonetheless said he was open to a changing of the country’s regulations on the issue.

Public opinion polls indicate that while most Mexicans are opposed to the legalization of recreational cannabis, they remain supportive of its use for medical purposes.

Mexico is not the only country in the region grappling with the issue — Colombia and Uruguay have both relaxed their cannabis laws, while Chile’s Congress is currently debating a bill that would legalize its use.

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