Marijuana And Tobacco Appear In Almost Half Of Popular Music Videos, Study Shows

Marijuana And Tobacco Appear In Almost Half Of Popular Music Videos, Study Shows

Marijuana and tobacco were featured in nearly half of the most popular hip-hop and R&B music videos from 2013 to 2017, new research finds.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine on Monday, takes a critical look at the prevalence of regulated products appearing in hit music videos. The team of researchers found that 40 to 50 percent of the videos reviewed depicted smoking or vaping tobacco or cannabis.

snoop lion smoke GIF

“While there is no doubt that hip-hop artists have made many positive contributions to social change—speaking out on issues like police violence against minorities—there’s also a history of showing regulated substances in hip-hop and other popular music,” Kristin Knutzen, lead author of the study, said in a press release.

“These depictions may affect fans’ attitudes toward smoking and increase the likelihood of smoking—particularly among young people.”

For the analysis, researchers examined the Billboard Top 50 charts for R&B and hip-hop from 2013 to 2017. Of the 1,250 songs covered in those charts, 769 had accompanying music videos that were included in the review.

“The proportion of songs with accompanying music videos that contained combustible use, electronic use, or smoke or vapor equaled 44 percent in 2014, 40 percent in 2015, 50 percent in 2016, and 47 percent in 2017. (For a total of 39.5 billion views).”

Besides the significant prevalence of marijuana and tobacco depictions in these videos, researchers also observed that the more views a given music video received, the more likely it was that they featured tobacco or cannabis products.

In other words, people seem to be more likely to watch and share music videos that show marijuana or tobacco consumption.

Forty-two percent of the songs that received 8,700 to 19 million views showed marijuana or tobacco products. For videos that received 112 million to four billion views, though, 50 percent featured these products.

When it comes to tobacco products, one interesting trend is the lack of manufactured cigarettes that appeared in these videos. Only 8 percent of the songs reviewed showed manufactured, as opposed to rolled, cigarettes.

But depictions of brands seem to be on the rise. Brand placement showing combustable (i.e. smokable) cannabis or tobacco products appeared in appeared in 0 percent of the top music videos in 2013, compared to 10 percent in 2017. Depictions of electronic vaping products rose from 25 percent in 2013 to 88 percent in 2017.

The researchers expressed concern with the rise of smoking or vaping depictions in popular videos.

“When young people, especially adolescents, see their favorite artists using tobacco products in music videos, they can begin to view them as normal in hip-hop culture, and they can begin to see themselves using them,” study co-author Samir Soneji said in a press release. “They also could view them as less harmful than they are. That’s a very real public health threat.”

While few studies to date have examined the relationship between the appearance of cannabis products in popular culture and youth consumption habits, the medium has seen renewed interest recently. A study published earlier this year, for example, also showed a dramatic increase in references to marijuana in popular songs.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Marijuana And Tobacco Appear In Almost Half Of Popular Music Videos, Study Shows

Melissa Etheridge Talks Art, Culture and Marijuana Advocacy In The Legalization Era

Melissa Etheridge Talks Art, Culture and Marijuana Advocacy In The Legalization Era

It’s been a little over a year since singer, activist and marijuana entrepreneur Melissa Etheridge was arrested for cannabis possession by federal agents in North Dakota near the U.S.-Canada border. Her tour bus was stopped and searched shortly after touring in Alberta, and agents discovered a vape pen containing cannabis oil.

Etheridge, who’s become an outspoken advocate for legalization in the years since she started using the plant medicinally after being diagnosed with breast cancer in her 40s, told Marijuana Moment in a new interview that the experience of being busted did not deter her.

Rather, it has motivated her to continue advocating for patients and spreading the word about marijuana’s therapeutic potential.

Later this month, the singer plans to continue that mission, giving a keynote talk on how art and culture can help bring cannabis into the mainstream at the California Cannabis Business Conference in Anaheim. In the interview below, which has been lightly edited for length and clarity, she speaks about what the audience can expect and the role of celebrities in the legalization movement.

Via Tina Lawson.

Marijuana Moment: Let’s start by talking about your upcoming speech. How exactly can art and culture “mainstream” cannabis?

Melissa Etheridge: I know that I have lived my life in art. I have made my life art, and my art is my life. I write music and I have experience—when I went through my breast cancer experience, and I used cannabis as medicine for the first time, it was inspiring. It made sense to me on so many levels. Artists, we spend a lot of time in our right brain. We get inspiration—which means “in spirt”—from nothing and make something of it. So it’s easy for us to understand plant medicine. Why shouldn’t we be the ones to help bridge that gap?

MM: Inversely, I wonder how using marijuana has influenced your artistic career?

ME: Oh my goodness, well if you hear everything from after my cancer on, you can hear it. The difference in the work, the depth of my soul-searching, the depth of my spiritual journey. It changed my understanding of parenting. To be more balanced in one’s consciousness, to understand that we have a problem-solving consciousness—the left side, and that gets everything done—yet we need a balance of the oneness, the all there is that’s in the right side.

MM: Where do you see the role of celebrities when it comes to advancing marijuana reform?

ME: Celebrities have a funny role in our world, you know? We keep saying, we’re just people, people. And sometimes we’re just people who have done one thing really well for a long time and that’s what you become a “genius” at—that’s all that that is. So all of a sudden, people are interested in that, so you get this currency, this energy, that is celebrity. Then it’s up to each of us.

I went through this with the LGBT community. I proudly came out and said ‘yes!’ and I’ve heard from, and know that I’ve inspired, many, and that makes me just so happy in my life. Yet I’ve made some mistakes, you know? And we’re all just walking through this. Celebrities, if they choose to, can do a lot. My hope is that I can help others look at cannabis as medicine, as an alternative, when the choice that they’re given is a painkiller, an opioid, to say, “Hey, let’s try to put the stigma away and really get into this plant medicine that won’t harm us as much.” I hope my celebrity can help there.

MM: Do you think there’s a greater need for celebrities who are profiting from the marijuana industry to contribute to the movement in terms of grassroots organizing or contributing to national advocacy groups, for example?

ME: I think that’s a natural byproduct of the movement. I think that the majority of people in the cannabis industry understand it is as a social game-changer on so many levels—on justice reform, on racial inequality, it goes deep. This is a movement.

MM: You also run a marijuana business based in California. What has your experience been like since Proposition 64 went into effect?

ME: We all agree that legalization is a good thing. Prop. 64 is full of almost impossible criteria to me, and it’s causing undue financial burdens. No other industry has ever had to meet these regulation requirements—not even the food industry and certainly not the pharmaceutical industry.

MM: The anniversary of your arrest near the border recently passed. I wonder what you make of the progress we’re seeing in Canada, which is set to launch its legal cannabis system next week, compared to the United States.

ME: Oh, Canada. Again, there are parallels with the LGBT movement. I remember Canada went completely federal—we’re doing gay marriage, bam, same-sex marriage, equality. I don’t know what it is, unless it’s just that anybody who would come to Canada to live—because it’s so darn cold—that they really believe in rights for all, this great thing. I think they also jumped on cannabis pretty early and have seen what it can do for communities, what it can do medicinally, what it can do for businesses and that’s what’s going to just kill us. We are missing out on the opportunity to be the international leaders on cannabis. And it’s these beautiful people up in Canada who are doing it so well. It’s like when the Japanese started making better cars than us.

MM: As a longtime activist, what message would you send to our elected official in Congress, where cannabis reform has stalled for decades?

ME: I’d say, I understand the fear. It has been many decades of misinformation telling us that cannabis is evil. I get it. I’ve heard that also. These are different times and it’s possible to think differently about this medicine. This is an answer for you. Really give it a chance.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Melissa Etheridge Talks Art, Culture and Marijuana Advocacy In The Legalization Era

High Notes: A Closer Look at the Relationship Between Cannabis and Music

High Notes: A Closer Look at the Relationship Between Cannabis and Music

Cannabis and music is a powerful, transcending combination that can breathe life to one’s mind and body after a long day. Try cueing your favorite song that you’ve heard thousands of times while under the influence and it’s like you’re hearing the track again for the first time. Beats sound heavier, high frequencies whisper smoothly into your ear and vocals seem like they’re speaking directly to your curious soul.

“We don’t usually think of feeling music, we think of hearing it. But when people speak about listening to music while using cannabis, they describe it as richer, more textured; it has more depth,” said Joe Dolce, author of Brave New Weed.

This surreal experience makes cannabis one of the most unique plants on the planet. Read on to learn about how cannabis affects the way you listen to music and hear the world around you.

Enhancing Auditory Perception

The synergistic relationship between cannabis and music can be traced to the herb’s cerebral effects. During consumption, cannabis targets one’s brain receptors, resulting in heightened sensitivity and awareness. When it comes to specific sound-waves, scientists from a 1974 study observed individuals displaying signs of sensitivity to high frequencies above 6,000 Hz. High frequency ranges are known for providing information about the location of the sound source. Interestingly, this phenomenon also supports the beneficial aspects of cannabis for people suffering from high frequency hearing loss, which is one of the early symptoms of age-related presbycusis.

In addition to increased sensitivity to high sound frequencies, cannabis helps one become more personally receptive to the emotional and dream-like layers of music. According to neurobiologist, music producer and McGill professor Daniel Levitin, THC is capable of reducing stress and disrupting short-term memory. So instead of thinking about the next song in your playlist, you’re more likely to immerse yourself in every note or beat of the track.

“Subconsciously all of the usual processes of expectation formation are still occurring, but consciously, the music creates what many people describe as a time-standing-still phenomenon. They live for each note, completely in the moment,”

explained Levitin.

Maximizing Your Experience

There are several ways to maximize your musical experience while consuming cannabis. For an intimate, one-on-one listening session, the first step is to block out all other noises and distractions around you. The easiest and most direct way to accomplish this is by using headphones. Cannabis has a time-stretching effect when listening to music, making echo and reverb sound very appealing.

Due to one’s temporary ability to hear a wider range of frequencies, you should also ditch your low-quality, ripped mp3s (we all have them!) for high-quality copies. Disgustingly “pixelated” mp3s are missing a range of frequencies in order to suit smaller file sizes.

Lastly, to keep your experience fresh and memorable, try incorporating other activities that don’t involve listening, like exploring nature, cooking in the kitchen or painting. When adding a third activity into the mix, some people recommend letting your selected tunes unfold in the background by keeping volume levels moderate.

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