Select Page
CCIA Calls For Help Supporting The SAFE Banking Act

CCIA Calls For Help Supporting The SAFE Banking Act

The California Cannabis Industry Association (CCIA) is calling for cannabis businesses to join them in imploring Speaker Pelosi to prioritize the Secure and Fair Enforcement Banking Act (SAFE Banking Act).

Click this link to add your company name and logo to the letter that will be sent to Speaker Pelosi later today. The cutoff time of today, August 4 at 5 pm is quickly approaching. Act now.

What is the SAFE Banking Act?

The SAFE Banking Act is a measure that will allow financial institutions, like banks and credit unions, and insurance providers to work with state-legal, legitimate cannabis businesses without fear of federal prosecution.

Currently, these service providers are not able to work with cannabis businesses because cannabis remains federally illegal under the Controlled Substances Act. More than 30 states, Washington D.C., Guam, and U.S. Virgin Islands have enacted either medicinal or recreational legalization amendments. Cannabis businesses deserve the same access to banking and insurance services as any other legitimate business. The federal government cannot ignore the will of the people, and lawmakers need to hear from you to know that you want them to support the SAFE Banking Act.

This is the email statement from the CCIA about the plan to send a letter:

Now is the time to raise our voices and fight for SAFE Banking on behalf of the entire cannabis community. We have a narrow window to implore Speaker Pelosi to prioritize this legislation. Please lend your name to this crucial effort by 5 pm on 8/4!

CCIA and The Liaison Group have been working tirelessly behind the scenes on SAFE Banking. Our efforts in the spring with California Delegation leaders Correa, Porter and Lieu, were crucial to SAFE making it into the Heroes Act.

SAFE Banking has passed out of the House on two occasions, the latest being part of the Heroes Act (H.R. 6800), however, this bill is yet to be passed by the Senate and signed into law. We need our leadership in California to negotiate that SAFE language remains in the COVID relief act!

We need SAFE Banking to ensure that BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) owned businesses, especially women, have equitable access to funding and for the safety of our employees and our communities. We know that the fight for social justice and cannabis reform are deeply intertwined and that cannabis justice is racial justice. We cannot hope to repair our communities through reinvestment without the appropriate tools, including SAFE Banking.

CCIA will be submitting a letter on behalf of our members to urge Speaker Pelosi to help fight for SAFE Banking. Please use the link below to add your company name and logo by 5 pm 8/4.

https://cacannabisindustry.formstack.com/forms/ccia_safe_banking_letter

We’re in this fight together!

Below is a copy of the letter that the CCIA will send to Speaker Pelosi today:

August 5, 2020

The Honorable Nancy Pelosi 
U.S. House of Representatives 
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Speaker Pelosi:

For the safety of our employees and our communities, we the undersigned implore you to ensure the SAFE Banking Act remains part of COVID relief. As you know, the SAFE Banking passed out of the House on two occasions. The first was standalone bill H.R. 1595 and the second as part of the Heroes Act (H.R. 6800), however, this bill is yet to be passed by the Senate and signed into law. Upon reviewing the Senate response to Heroes, we were disappointed to see SAFE Banking not included, but want to make sure that this important piece of legislation is part of a final negotiated package. We need SAFE Banking to ensure that BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) owned businesses, especially those owned by women, have equitable access to funding. Most notably, BIPOC owners who have been most adversely impacted by the pandemic compared to their white counterparts. Below are just some reasons among many that stress the importance of this relief.

  • Los Angeles’s social equity program, one of the few in the state, was designed to promote equitable ownership in the cannabis industry, but this program has had considerable challenges due to an imbalance of wealth. Although it was intended that Social Equity applicants have the opportunity to be first to market, a group of said applicants were forced to file a lawsuit to achieve fairness in a flawed process, which has now been settled. This is just the first step in an attempt to achieve equity. The majority of Social Equity applicants have not been able to afford the delayed process, nor the start-up costs associated with launching a cannabis business. 
  • BIPOC operators lack access to the capital that is essential to start cannabis businesses, so establishing loan programs would help with this burden. However, even if the SBA were to set up a loan program, this could not be effectuated without access to banks. 
  • Unfortunately, in the states that have equity programs written into their cannabis statutes, BIPOC owners fall prey to predatory business arrangements in which larger cannabis companies will be effectively running the businesses through a management services agreement while the BIPOC owner becomes a figurehead. 
  • Women and BIPOC face significant barriers to accessing investment dollars. Every year women of color get less than 1% of total venture capital funding. Further, data from 2019 indicates that only 200 Latinx and Black individuals nationwide were able to raise over $1 million in venture capital. This number is for all industries, not just cannabis. 
  • The bill is unquestionably part of a holistic approach to ending the War on Drugs, and its devastating effects on communities of color. The longer that BIPOC entrepreneurs have to wait to enter this industry, the greater disadvantage they are at because of larger companies’ ability to build their brands and customer loyalty. 
  • SAFE Banking reduces cash motivated crimes. Cannabis businesses and employees are routinely targeted, robbed, and sometimes attacked because of the large amounts of cash that they are forced to deal with.
  • Lastly, SAFE Banking as included in the Heroes Act (H.R 6800) calls for two diversity studies for the cannabis industry. While these studies will largely tell us what we currently know (that non-white representation in the industry is disproportionately low), this will create an important baseline for future conversations around legalization and ensuring the industry is equitable. 

We know that the fight for social justice and cannabis reform are deeply intertwined and that cannabis justice is racial justice. We cannot hope to repair our communities through reinvestment without the appropriate tools, including SAFE Banking. The events of recent months have shown us that this bill is more important than ever. We urge its swift passage to help our economy and our communities.

Sincerely,

Lindsay Robinson
Executive Director 
California Cannabis Industry Association (CCIA)

Conrad Gregory 
CCIA Board President 
Senior Vice President Harborside

Swetha Kaul
CCIA Board Vice President

Here’s Where The Next House Speaker Stands On Marijuana

Here’s Where The Next House Speaker Stands On Marijuana

The midterms are over, but Democrats in the House have already found themselves locked in another contentious race that could ultimately have big implications for marijuana legislation in the 116th Congress.

Will Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) reclaim her seat as speaker of the House? Or will a coalition of frustrated lawmakers usher in a new leader like Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-OH), who has all but confirmed her intent to run for the position?

What’s known at this point is that at least 17 Democratic lawmakers have signed a letter opposing Pelosi’s bid, and a handful of others have made public statements affirming that they plan to vote against Pelosi when the new Congress is seated on January 3.

Here’s a look at where Pelosi and Fudge fall on marijuana issues:

Looking at voting records, Pelosi cosponsored a number of marijuana bills in the 1990s and early 2000s—including several to protect states that legalized medical cannabis from federal interference—but she hasn’t signed her name onto a single piece of standalone marijuana legislation over the past 17 years.

Although Pelosi started cosponsoring fewer bills in general after being named House speaker in 2007 and in her post-speakership years, she’s still put her name on dozens of pieces of legislation during that time—though none are related to marijuana.

Fudge, meanwhile, has been ramping up her bill cosponsorships when it comes to cannabis reform. Over the past two years, the former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) signed on to a bill that would end federal marijuana prohibition and a resolution acknowledging the failures of the war on drugs, for example. Prior to the current Congress, though, she hadn’t signed onto any cannabis bills since first joining the House in 2008.

Aside from the issue of proactive bill sponsorship, both Pelosi and Fudge have consistently voted in favor of floor amendments to protect legal medical and adult-use marijuana states, allow Department of Veterans Affairs doctors to recommend cannabis to patients, allow industrial hemp and expand access to banking institutions for marijuana businesses.

Both congresswomen have received “B” grades from NORML.

“Looking at the conversation of Democratic leadership right now and how the speaker vote is set to go, I would suspect that Pelosi is going to be elected to be the speaker for the 116th Congress,” NORML political director Justin Strekal told Marijuana Moment.

“Nancy Pelosi has demonstrated herself to be a very effective leader of the Democratic Caucus and was instrumental in ensuring a favorable vote outcome for the first time that the [Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA)] language was passed on the House floor in order to restrict the Department of Justice’s ability to enforce federal prohibition against the states that have legalized medical marijuana programs. Her operation has been engaged with—and in regular talks with—our champions of the Cannabis Caucus and members who are supportive, and we have every indication that we will have her full support in moving legislation forward that would end federal prohibition.”

Where the two Democratic lawmakers seem to diverge is in public statements about cannabis reform. For example, Pelosi has talked about marijuana (and yoga) as a safer alternative to opioids and she pushed back against former Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s decision to rescind an Obama-era marijuana guidance policy.

“Congress must now take action to ensure that state law is respected, and that Americans who legally use marijuana are not subject to federal prosecution,” she said in a press release earlier this year. “Democrats will continue to insist on bipartisan provisions in appropriations bills that protect Americans lawfully using medical marijuana. Congress should now consider expanding the provisions to cover those states that have decriminalized marijuana generally.”

Pelosi also endorsed California’s successful adult-use legalization ballot measure in 2016.

“Pelosi has been a solid ally on drug policy reform,” Michael Collins, interim director for the office of national affairs at the Drug Policy Alliance, told Marijuana Moment. “She has voted for many marijuana reform amendments, been a tough negotiator on numerous appropriations issues, has fought against regressive drug sentencing proposals like [Stop the Importation and Trafficking of Synthetic Analogues Act].”

“Crucially, her staff have always been available, willing and ready to advance drug policy reform,” he said.

Fudge, meanwhile, has been relatively quiet on the issue in spite of her recent support for reform legislation. And she doesn’t seem to have weighed in on Ohio’s unsuccessful 2015 legalization ballot measure.

For all of Pelosi’s talk and votes on cannabis reform, though, she was noncommittal when asked in September whether she planned to bring marijuana bills to the floor in 2019 if Democrats retook the House.

“Well, the marijuana initiatives have received bipartisan support on the floor of the House,” Pelosi said. “I don’t know where the president is on any of this. So any decision about how we go forward would have to reflect where we can get the result.”

Fudge also hasn’t indicated that she’d pursue a marijuana reform agenda if selected to be speaker. Instead, she told HuffPost reporter Matt Fuller that she’d make issues like health care, student debt, infrastructure and job creation top priorities for Democrats.

Other potential House speaker contenders on cannabis.

Another Ohio Democrat, Rep. Tim Ryan, is reported to be floating another run for the speakership after losing to Pelosi for Democratic leader in 2016. Ryan said that he was initially reluctant to get behind marijuana legalization but, after witnessing the harms of prohibition, he wrote that cannabis “should be legal in all 50 states.

The current chair of the CBC, Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-LA), is another potential contender for the position. Under Richmond’s leadership, the CBC has called for the end of federal marijuana prohibition and released a bill in May that outlined several wide-ranging reform proposals such as removing cannabis from the list of federally banned substances.

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) is reported to be laying the groundwork for a future House speaker run, starting with a bid to become the next House Democratic Caucus chair, Politico reports. He’s a strong proponent of marijuana decriminalization. “The connected and powerful—including many in high political office—have frequently admitted to smoking marijuana when they were young,” Jeffries wrote in a 2012 editorial for CNN. “We didn’t unmercifully penalize them. We should stop needlessly criminalizing tens of thousands of our young people for doing the same thing.”

Then, of course, there’s Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA), one of the most vocal advocates for cannabis reform on Capitol Hill for years. She’s also currently running to become the next House Democratic Caucus chair, though a sizable following of supporters are pushing her to compete against Pelosi in the speaker race. This year, Lee has introduced legislation to protect legal marijuana states and also promote diversity in the burgeoning cannabis industry.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Here’s Where The Next House Speaker Stands On Marijuana

Democrats And Republicans Clash Over Which Party Will Lead On Marijuana In 2019

Democrats And Republicans Clash Over Which Party Will Lead On Marijuana In 2019

Which party is going to take a leadership role in advancing marijuana reform after the midterm elections? It depends on who you ask.

On Thursday, both Reps. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) indicated that their respective party would be backing legislation to change federal cannabis laws in the months after November’s critical election. Rohrabacher said that he’d received assurances that the White House would support reform efforts during the 116th Congress, which begins in January.

“It could be as early as spring of 2019, but definitely in the next legislative session,” he said, noting that President Donald Trump planned to keep his promise to support a bipartisan bill to protect legal states from federal interference.

Later, Blumenauer—a close colleague of the Republican congressman when it comes to cannabis reform efforts—said that Democrats would promote legislation to change cannabis laws in the first half of 2019 if his party retakes the House.

“With Democrats in control, we will be able to have the legislative process work and we’ll see more progress in a relatively short order, I think.”

“These will be some of the easiest things to do in the first six months of a new Congress because they’re supported by the public, the legislation is already teed up and ready to go,” Blumenauer said in an interview with Bloomberg. “It’s one of these areas of progress that will show we can get our act together and move forward.”

“It doesn’t have to be the top priority. It’s simpler than health care or global warming. And it’s supported by the public. I think it’s a no-brainer. I think it moves in the next six months.”

Watch the full interview here:

Blumenauer seems to be breaking somewhat from his party’s leadership. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-MD), for example, said last month that top Democrats haven’t yet “talked about” promoting federal marijuana legislation if the party retakes the House in the midterm elections. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) also suggested that the fate of federal cannabis reform would depend, in part, on the will of the president.

“I don’t know where the president is on any of this,” Pelosi said. “So any decision about how we go forward would have to reflect where we can get the result.”

Trump Plans To Back Legal Medical Marijuana After Midterms, GOP Congressman Says

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Democrats And Republicans Clash Over Which Party Will Lead On Marijuana In 2019

Trump Plans To Back Legal Medical Marijuana After Midterms, GOP Congressman Says

Trump Plans To Back Legal Medical Marijuana After Midterms, GOP Congressman Says

Marijuana reform will likely be on the Trump administration’s agenda after the midterm elections, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) said on Thursday.

In an interview with Fox Business, Rohrabacher said he’s been “talking to people inside the White House” and members of President Donald Trump’s inner circle about ending cannabis prohibition. The congressman said he’s been “reassured that the president intends on keeping his campaign promise” to protect local marijuana policies from federal interference.

Though Rohrabacher didn’t point to specific legislation that the president is reportedly interested in advancing, he said that details would likely begin to take shape after November 6.

“I would expect after the election we will sit down and we’ll start hammering out something that is specific and real.”

Trump has previously voiced support for a bipartisan bill, introduced by Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Cory Gardner (R-CO), which would amend the Controlled Substances Act to protect states that legalize cannabis from federal interference. He also embraced medical cannabis during his presidential campaign, saying that he knows people who have benefited from using it.

Rohrabacher, in the new interview published Thursday, laid out a vague timeline for anticipated congressional action on marijuana reform.

“It could be as early as spring of 2019, but definitely in the next legislative session,” he said.

What remains to be seen is which party will ultimately take the lead on marijuana after the midterms. Though Democrats are generally more supportive of cannabis reform and multiple bills have been introduced to achieve that end, a top House Democrat recently conceded that the party hasn’t been actively discussing plans to pass marijuana legislation.

Asked last month whether Democrats would bring cannabis legislation to the floor if the party retakes the House in November, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-MD) admitted “[w]e haven’t talked about that.”

And House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), who is expected to seek the speakership again if Democrats win control of the chamber in the midterms, indicated that the prospects for marijuana legislation would depend on support from the president.

“I don’t know where the president is on any of this,” she said. “So any decision about how we go forward would have to reflect where we can get the result.”

Based on polling, either party stands to benefit from taking on a marijuana friendly agenda. Fewer Republican voters support full legalization, compared to Democrats, but when it comes to medical cannabis, there’s sizable majority support on both sides of the aisle.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Trump Plans To Back Legal Medical Marijuana After Midterms, GOP Congressman Says

Nancy Pelosi Suggests Marijuana And Yoga As Opioid Alternatives

Nancy Pelosi Suggests Marijuana And Yoga As Opioid Alternatives

The top Democrat in the U.S. House says that doctors should more often suggest medical marijuana and yoga to patients in pain instead of doling out so many prescription opioids.

“Doctors say, ‘Don’t tell us how many pills we can prescribe.’ Well maybe we should,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) said at a press conference last week. “Others say there are other ways to relieve stress and relieve pain and that you don’t need opioids in the first place. We are too reliant to transition from them. Marijuana, yoga, all kinds of other things that are homeopathic but are not addictive in this dangerous way.”

Pelosi, who represents San Francisco in Congress, has long been a supporter of medical cannabis.

Her new remarks about marijuana as a safer alternative to opioids were made at an event in support of opioid treatment, prevention and research funding legislation recently filed by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Congressman Elijah Cummings (D-MD).

A growing body of research suggests that states with legal marijuana access see reduced opioid overdose rates.

Earlier this year, U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) called out pharmaceutical companies for opposing marijuana legalization.

“To them it’s competition for chronic pain, and that’s outrageous because we don’t have the crisis in people who take marijuana for chronic pain having overdose issues,” she said. “It’s not the same thing. It’s not as highly addictive as opioids are.”

Over the weekend, Pelosi’s Republican counterpart in the House, Speaker Paul Ryan, told some marijuana jokes in a video message played at the White House Correspondents Association dinner.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Nancy Pelosi Suggests Marijuana And Yoga As Opioid Alternatives

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']