Select Page
Vermont On The Precipice Of Legalizing Marijuana Sales

Vermont On The Precipice Of Legalizing Marijuana Sales

Marijuana may be legal in Vermont, but there are no dispensaries slinging pre-rolls and dab pens because a retail framework has not yet been established.

The Legal Status of Marijuana in Vermont

In January of 2018, Vermont made cannabis history by becoming the first state in the union to legalize marijuana through an act of lawmakers, instead of through a ballot initiative. At that point, they were the ninth state to end prohibition. The bill allowed for residents of the Green Mountain State above the age of 21 to possess up to an ounce of marijuana for personal use, and to cultivate no more than two cannabis plants.

The bill, however, did not make permissible the sale of marijuana. So while Vermonters won’t find themselves in trouble with the law for simply having cannabis in their possession, the process of actually acquiring it has not changed all that much since becoming legal.

The History of S. 54

Almost exactly one year after legalizing marijuana, the Vermont State Senate produced another bill—one that would allow Vermont to create a taxable cannabis market akin to what we see in states like Washington and Colorado. That piece of legislation, titled S. 54, was overwhelmingly approved by the Senate with a veto-proof majority of 23 to 5. However, that was just the beginning.

Fast forward another year—S. 54 made its way to the House, where it was subject to amendments. Most of which were related to tax structure, and included opening an education fund where tax revenue from cannabis sales would be directly deposited. This move was seen as an appeal to Republican Governor Phil Scott, who despite originally opposing legalizing marijuana sales, implied he might come around on the issue if the tax revenue could be used to fund his after school proposal.

The bill officially cleared the house in February of this year. 

Where is S. 54 Now?

Currently, two versions of S. 54 exist—the original Senate bill, and the House’s iteration with the added amendments. Vermont legislators appointed members to a bicameral conference committee to merge the two versions into one back in March, but much to the chagrin of marijuana advocates, the committee has not yet been authorized to meet. In May, House Speaker Mitzi Johnson (D) told Marijuana Moment that S. 54 would have to take a back seat to the pandemic. “Our attention, I believe rightly, has been entirely on the COVID crisis and making sure that we get Vermonters through this very intense desperate period,” said Johnson.

However, on Wednesday, August 5 Johnson’s chief of staff told Marijuana Moment in an email that “S.54 is currently in a committee of conference and we expect that committee to meet during the August/September legislative session. That’s consistent with what the leader said during a June telephone town hall, where she said they were ‘aiming to get it passed in August.’”

The Future of S. 54

While S. 54 is only a few weeks away from reaching the seemingly supportive bicameral committee that will be responsible for deciding it’s fate, there’s still one more hurdle to clear—and it’s a big one.

After the committee reconciles the bill’s two versions into one, and both chambers approve it, that final piece of legislation will land on Governor Phil Scott’s desk. Once there, Scott will have the option to either sign it into law, or veto it. Scott has historically been opposed to legalization, but has also indicated that he may be open to S. 54 depending on where the tax revenue was spent. Since taking office, Governor Scott has vetoed both a family leave plan, and a minimum wage increase.

Vermont Democratic Party Calls For Marijuana Legalization Expansion

Vermont Democratic Party Calls For Marijuana Legalization Expansion

Vermont’s Democratic-led legislature passed a bill to legalize low-level possession and home cultivation of marijuana earlier this year. Now, party activists are calling on lawmakers to expand on that by allowing a system of legal cannabis production and sales.

“We believe that marijuana should be legal, taxed and regulated in the interests of consumer and public health, and economic opportunity,” reads a platform plank adopted by delegates at the Vermont Democratic Party’s platform convention on Sunday.

The limited legalization bill was signed into law by Gov. Phil Scott (R) in January.

While Scott, who is up for reelection this year, has said the state won’t be ready to go further until better solutions to address impaired driving are formulated, Democratic challenger Christine Hallquist is all-in on expanded legalization, pledging to “work with the legislature to ensure that a tax and regulate system was passed into law in my first term.”

Democratic leaders in both chambers of the legislature brought the noncommercial legalization proposal to votes last session, but House Speaker Mitzi Johnson (D) has been reluctant about adding tax and regulate. Meanwhile, the Senate has already passed legislation to legalize cannabis sales.

Advocates hope that the Democratic Party’s new official position in support of expanding to a regulated commercial system of legalization like ones that exist in eight other states will encourage Johnson and other top lawmakers to prioritize moving a bill early in 2019.

“The Vermont Democratic Party has now officially and fully embraced the position that regulating the production and sale of cannabis is the smart way to achieve improvements in public health and safety – a position strongly supported by the general public,” Dave Silberman, an attorney and pro bono drug policy reform advocate, told Marijuana Moment.

“From the party officials at the dais, to the grassroots members on the platform convention floor, support for regulation was vocal, even amongst delegates who opposed homegrow legalization,” added Silberman, who authored the language of the new platform plank as a delegate at the convention over the weekend. “This sends Vermonters an unambiguous message ahead of November’s election: a vote for Democratic legislators is a vote for tax-and-regulate.”

Meanwhile, the party is also pushing for broader drug policy reforms that go beyond cannabis.

“We recognize that the ‘War on Drugs’ has been disproportionately focused on people of color and those with low incomes, and urge the adoption of non-discriminatory, public health-based approaches,” reads an additional new platform plank.

“We believe that Vermont’s policies towards drug use and abuse should be motivated by a desire to reduce harm, rather than to punish undesirable private behavior,” says another.

A third new plank touches on the far-reaching effects of drug and other convictions: “We support ensuring that the collateral consequences of criminal convictions do not last a lifetime, by enabling more people to clear their records after having repaid their debt to society. To do this, we must expand access and reduce financial and bureaucratic barriers to expungement.”

On a voice vote, delegates defeated a proposed plank calling for the decriminalization of all drugs. The party’s 2016 platform called for “exploration of the decriminalization of drug use and instead treating it as a health and mental health issue” but was silent on cannabis specifically.

“The feeling the room was that while almost all support alternatives to incarceration, the party was not quite yet ready to fully embrace decriminalization,” Silberman said.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Vermont Democratic Party Calls For Marijuana Legalization Expansion

Vermont Lawmakers Push To Expand Marijuana Legalization

Vermont Lawmakers Push To Expand Marijuana Legalization

Barely three months after successfully passing legislation to legalize low-level marijuana possession and home cultivation, Vermont lawmakers are pushing to add a statewide system of taxed and regulated cannabis sales.

A coalition of Democratic, Republican and Progressive lawmakers in the House moved on Thursday to take up marijuana commercialization legislation that already passed the Senate last year.

“I believe we have the votes, and I believe at the end of the day we will have a surprising number of votes with a tripartisan coalition,” Dave Silberman, a Middlebury attorney and pro bono drug policy reform advocate, told Marijuana Moment in an interview.

House Speaker Mitzi Johnson (D), however, said that now is not the time to push broader legalization, and Gov. Phil Scott (R), who only reluctantly signed the noncommercial legalization bill into law in January after previously vetoing another version, is unlikely to support the expansion.

Silberman said that supportive lawmakers are moving to amend the Senate-passed bill, H.167, with a focus on smaller-scale businesses and co-ops. He added that a significant number of lawmakers who have concerns with legalization and opposed the earlier bill are now more likely to back moves to regulate the cannabis trade in light of the fact that possession and homegrow will be legal in the state starting on July 1.

“Quite a few said, ‘now that it’s legal, I think tax-and-regulate’s a better model,’” Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman (VPP) told VPR radio. “So if Progressives, the Republicans that think this is the better way, and the many Democrats that inherently support this come together, I think we have a majority.”

The bill and several proposed amendments have been placed on the House calendar for Friday, but it is unlikely to see action until next week.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Vermont Lawmakers Push To Expand Marijuana Legalization

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']