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New Jersey Voters Strongly Support Legalizing Marijuana, Poll Finds

New Jersey Voters Strongly Support Legalizing Marijuana, Poll Finds

The Garden State is overwhelmingly in support of legalizing marijuana.

New Jersey voters are on board with ending cannabis prohibition by a margin of 62 percent to 33 percent, a new poll shows. That includes strong majorities of Democrats, independents, men, women, whites, nonwhites and every age group except those older than 65.

A whopping 90 percent of voters between the ages of 18 and 34 support cannabis legalization.

A separate question in the new Quinnipiac University survey, released on Wednesday, finds that voters support “erasing criminal records for marijuana possession,” 63 percent to 27 percent.

And when it comes to allowing legal marijuana sales in one’s own community, voters are comfortable with that to the tune of 50 percent to 45 percent.

The results of the new poll come just days after New Jersey Senate President Steve Sweeney (D) said there are enough votes in the legislature to send a legalization bill to the desk of Gov. Phil Murphy (D), who made ending prohibition a centerpiece of his electoral campaign last year.

Senate and Assembly votes are expected next month.

The Quinnipiac poll has a margin of error of +/- 4.6 percentage points.

New Jersey Senate President Says He Has The Votes To Legalize Marijuana

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

New Jersey Voters Strongly Support Legalizing Marijuana, Poll Finds

Support for Marijuana Legalization At Record High, New Survey Shows

Support for Marijuana Legalization At Record High, New Survey Shows

Support for marijuana legalization is at an all-time high across party lines, a new poll finds.

Sixty-eight percent of American voters now want to end cannabis prohibition, according to the survey released on Wednesday by leading progressive think tank the Center for American Progress (CAP) and the research firm GBA Strategies.

Breaking down the demographics, here’s who’s now on board with legalizing marijuana:

  • 57 percent of Republicans
  • 77 percent of Democrats
  • 62 percent of independents
  • 66 percent of men
  • 69 percent of women
  • 69 percent of whites
  • 72 percent of African Americans
  • 64 percent of Latinos

marijuana legalization

The poll, which surveyed 1,000 registered voters, also found sizable, bipartisan support for measures to seal the criminal records of nonviolent offenders who serve their sentences.

Other recent national surveys examining American sentiment toward cannabis reform have shown similar majority support for legalization: Gallup released a 2017 poll that found 64 percent of Americans support legalization, for example, and a Quinnipiac University survey this April showed 63 percent support.

But the CAP legalization numbers are the highest yet.

While the upward movement in public opinion with respect to legalization has been a consistent trend, especially over the past decade, the bipartisan nature of the new survey results is significant.

“In an era of increasing partisanship, public support for ending cannabis criminalization is an issue that crosses party lines,” Paul Armentano, deputy director of NORML, said in a press release. “More and more, elected officials—and those who wish to be elected—must acknowledge that advocating in favor of marijuana policy reform is a political opportunity, not a political liability.”

Ed Chung, vice president of criminal justice reform at CAP, told Marijuana Moment that the message is clear: cannabis legalization is the will of the people, and lawmakers should take note.

“[Legalization is] certainly going to be, at least, a bipartisan issue,” Chung said. “I think you’ll see a lot of progressive [elected officials] who are going to be out front about this.”

“Now, I think that there’s a lot of work still to be done about how this plays out in different states and nationally as well, but the first step is getting the concept of this socialized among elected leaders—and oftentimes, unfortunately, elected leaders are not leading on this issues, but following.”

Looking ahead to the 2020 presidential election, Chung said “this is going to be one of those issues that’s going to speed up very quickly.”

“Two and half years from now is a lifetime for this issue and for other social justice-type issues moving forward,” he said. “The support is going to only increase from here—that’s me looking into my crystal ball here—but I don’t see how any candidate, any credible candidate, who wants to capture the majority of the American public is going to look at this issue… I don’t think anybody can keep with supporting current policy.”

The survey also demonstrated widespread support “for states to automatically seal the records of nonviolent criminal offenders, allowing people who have served their time and paid their debts to re-enter society and pursue work, education, and family life,” the survey authors wrote.

A solid 70 percent of respondents agreed that states should “automatically seal the records of individuals convicted of nonviolent felonies or misdemeanors if the person has completed his or her sentence and has not committed another criminal offense.” That includes 75 percent of Democratic voters and 66 percent of Republican voters.

legalizing marijuana

Notably, 58 percent of respondents said that they would be more likely to support a candidate who embraces legislation to give nonviolent offenders a clean slate, compared to just 18 percent who said they would be less likely to support such a candidate, the survey revealed.

The poll also found that 54 percent of marijuana legalization opponents support automatically sealing the records of people convicted of cannabis possession.

Chung said that the results reflected growing bipartisan consensus on issues related to criminal justice reform.

“The American public is showing not only support for changing the way the country has approached issues regarding substance use or substance misuse, but also trying to do something to help people who have been previously dragged through the criminal justice system,” he said. “I think a lot of criminal justice issues have that kind of really strange bedfellows, where you have progressives leading on social justice and the conservatives—libertarians especially—being on the [side of] government should stay out of my business.”

https://massroots.wpengine.com/news/marijuana-use-moral-porn-death-penalty-cloning-americans-say/

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Support for Marijuana Legalization At Record High, New Survey Shows

Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

More American voters now support legalizing marijuana than ever before, a new poll shows.

Sixty-three percent are now in favor of ending cannabis prohibition, with just 33 percent against, the new Quinnipiac University survey showed. Seventy-five percent of Democrats, 67 percent of independents and 41 percent of Republicans are on board.

The poll also showed that voters broadly oppose federal intervention in state marijuana laws, with just 23 percent supporting such interference. Strong majorities in every political, age, racial, gender and educational demographic support letting local cannabis polices be implemented.

When it comes to medical cannabis, 93 percent of voters were in favor, with just five percent against, the poll found.

Among voters in states that have already legalized marijuana, 48 percent said the move has been good for their state, with just 25 percent saying it has been a negative experience.

On the question of whether marijuana is a gateway drug, only 31 percent of voters agree, with 61 percent disputing the notion that cannabis leads to use of other substances.

The survey also asked about the economic impact of legalization and its impact on opioid use, as well as whether disagreeing with a politician’s stance on cannabis would make voters less likely to support him or her.

While Gallup found last year that 64 percent of Americans support legalizing marijuana, the 63 percent figure among voters is the highest level ever shown in ongoing surveys from Quinnipiac.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

Texas and New Jersey Voters Support Marijuana Legalization, Polls Show

Texas and New Jersey Voters Support Marijuana Legalization, Polls Show

A combo of new polls released on Thursday shows that voters in two key states are resoundingly in support of legalizing marijuana.

In Texas, voters back ending cannabis prohibition by a nearly two-to-one margin of 61 percent to 34 percent.

In New Jersey, adults support legalization 59 percent to 37 percent.

In both states, support is particularly strong among Democrats and independents.

The Texas survey, conducted by Quinnipiac University, showed that 69 percent of both demographics were on board, along with 43 percent of Republicans.

In the New Jersey poll, done by Monmouth University, 65 percent of Democrats and 60 percent of independents said they support legalizing cannabis. Forty-five percent of GOP respondents were in favor.

There is huge backing for legalization among younger people in both states: 79 percent of 18-34 year-olds in Texas and 69 percent among the same age group in New Jersey.

The New Jersey poll in particular could give a boost to Gov. Phil Murphy, who campaigned on legalization and included projected cannabis tax revenue in his budget request.

The new Garden State survey also found that 60 percent of respondents think legalizing marijuana would help the state’s economy.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Texas and New Jersey Voters Support Marijuana Legalization, Polls Show

Majority of American Adults Admit to Trying Cannabis, According to Recent Poll

Majority of American Adults Admit to Trying Cannabis, According to Recent Poll

If you grew up in an American household where your parents chastised you and warned you about the dangers of smoking marijuana, while at the same time disclaiming that they ever personally fell to the temptation of trying it, there’s a 52% percent chance they were lying, according to a recent poll. Well, maybe they weren’t both lying, but the math indicates that you may have at least one parent who should dress up as Shady McShaderton for this coming Halloween!

The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion teamed up with Yahoo news recently, and conducted a poll, where they found that nearly 129 million American adults admit to trying marijuana at some point in their lifetime. Of the American adults who admit to trying cannabis, a whopping 44%, say they still use the plant. Only 22% of American adults admit to currently using cannabis, but of the current users, 65% say they use the plant regularly, which is to say they use it at least once per month. 65% of those who admit to trying cannabis at some point in their lifetime, say that they are parents, and roughly half the parents are parents of children under the age of 18.

In a bit of an ironic twist, 70% of the respondents in the poll stated they thought their parents would be disappointed to know they were recreational users of cannabis, and 58% of the respondents who claimed to be parents, said they thought their children would be disappointed to learn their mother of father enjoyed marijuana recreationally.

The fact that these statistics are fairly close, makes it hard to believe that parents and their older children haven’t found out about the other’s use of the plant. Surprisingly though, 28% of parents say they’ve never even had a single conversation with their children about cannabis, only 33% say they have regular conversations with their children about it, and only 40% say they’ve had 1-3 conversations about it.

According to the poll, these statistics are up significantly from previous generations. 95% of the Silent-Greatest Generation (births between 1910-1924), and 72% of the Baby Boomer Generation (births between 1946-1964) were the most likely generations to say their parents never spoke to them about marijuana. Sadly, it seems to be a hush-hush situation, likely because of the stigma still attached to using cannabis because of its illegal status. It almost makes it seem as though communication could be the greatest issue in overcoming the “darkness” surrounding the benefits of cannabis.

The title of the study is called “Weed and the American Family”, and it incorporates everything from regulation, to clandestine usage of cannabis in relationships, to the demographic profiles of cannabis users, to political identity and recent voting tallies for the 2016 election. In reading the poll, we are again reminded of the shift in public opinion, as the article cites statistics that eight out of ten Americans strongly support the legalization of medical marijuana.

It begs the following question: When will it become common sense for the federal government to separate cannabis from its current classification as a dangerous schedule 1 drug? In all seriousness, the federal government still sees the use of cannabis, which has now been legalized in some capacity by 29 sovereign states, as the same thing as using heroin. While heroin and other opioids destroy American communities every day, cannabis sits in the back pocket of the federal government, where federal criminal enforcement is still used to hand down life changing sentences to those possessing the plant.

While the federal classification seems to be the greatest hurdle in overcoming the stigma attached to cannabis, the true healing is communication. When people share their ideas freely without fear of social backlash, more people who feel uncomfortable admitting their position find ways to be strong and speak up. This is what we are seeing now as people come around to the idea that cannabis is not evil.

When more of these people speak to not only their friends and families about their beliefs, but also to their elected officials about it, it paves the way to change. Before long, the laws will change to accommodate the views of the American people, just as they have slowly done with racism, same-sex marriage, and a host of other issues throughout the nation’s history. The law is one of the slowest changes to make, but it always comes around when leaders lead.

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