Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

More American voters now support legalizing marijuana than ever before, a new poll shows.

Sixty-three percent are now in favor of ending cannabis prohibition, with just 33 percent against, the new Quinnipiac University survey showed. Seventy-five percent of Democrats, 67 percent of independents and 41 percent of Republicans are on board.

The poll also showed that voters broadly oppose federal intervention in state marijuana laws, with just 23 percent supporting such interference. Strong majorities in every political, age, racial, gender and educational demographic support letting local cannabis polices be implemented.

When it comes to medical cannabis, 93 percent of voters were in favor, with just five percent against, the poll found.

Among voters in states that have already legalized marijuana, 48 percent said the move has been good for their state, with just 25 percent saying it has been a negative experience.

On the question of whether marijuana is a gateway drug, only 31 percent of voters agree, with 61 percent disputing the notion that cannabis leads to use of other substances.

The survey also asked about the economic impact of legalization and its impact on opioid use, as well as whether disagreeing with a politician’s stance on cannabis would make voters less likely to support him or her.

While Gallup found last year that 64 percent of Americans support legalizing marijuana, the 63 percent figure among voters is the highest level ever shown in ongoing surveys from Quinnipiac.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Record-High Support For Legal Marijuana, New Poll Shows

Poll Shows Voters in 3 States Support Legal Marijuana

Poll Shows Voters in 3 States Support Legal Marijuana

A recent poll, executed by Quinnipiac University from March 17 to 28, found a majority support for legal cannabis in three key swing states — Pennsylvania, Ohio and Florida.

The survey targeted voters in these three states because, since 1960, no candidate has won the presidential election without taking at least two of these three.

When Pennsylvania voters were asked if adults should be permitted “to legally possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use,” 51 percent of the 1,036 participants responded yes. Of the 1,077 people polled in Ohio, 52 percent responded yes, and 55 percent of the 1,087 asked in Florida said the same.

Voters in these three states apparently find legalizing marijuana for medicinal use to be far less controversial. Support for legal medical marijuana reached 84 percent in both Florida and Ohio, and 88 percent in Pennsylvania.

Although the poll found a majority support for legalization, the same did not transfer when asked about using the plant. In Florida, 81 percent of voters responded that they “definitely” or “probably” would not use the plant if it was legal. The vast majority, 84 percent, of Ohio voters said the same, and 83 percent of voters in Pennsylvania agreed.

If these polls are any indication, a majority support in three swing states could increase chances for legalization to be part of a platform in the 2016 presidential race. Legalization is becoming an important issue to registered voters in the United States, and where a presidential candidate stands on the issue may greatly influence his or her success.

Groups in many states are not waiting for 2016. In the Buckeye State, the group known as ResponsibleOhio is working to place a legalization measure on the 2015 ballot. The ballot language for their proposed amendment was recently approved, and now the group must focus on collecting  305,591 signatures before the July 1 deadline.

While there are no initiatives working to place a legalization amendment on the 2015 ballot in Pennsylvania, a limited medical marijuana bill was introduced by two senators during the 2015 legislative session.

The medical marijuana legalization amendment that was on the 2014 ballot in Florida, although approved by a vast majority of voters, did not reach the 60 percent support required to pass in the Sunshine State. The initiative has not stopped there however, as there is a new medical marijuana legalization measure aiming for 2016. In the meantime, one Florida senator introduced a bill to legalize marijuana for recreational use during the 2015 legislative session.

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']