Teen Marijuana Use Is Down In California Following Legalization, State-Funded Study Shows

Teen Marijuana Use Is Down In California Following Legalization, State-Funded Study Shows

Marijuana use among junior high and high school students is down across all age levels in California, according to the first survey of teen drug consumption conducted in the state since voters legalized recreational cannabis.

Results of the Biennial State California Healthy Kids Survey are consistent with data from other states that have legalized marijuana, where students have also reported declining or flat cannabis use rates following the end of prohibition for adults.

“Lifetime marijuana use was reported by 4%, 17%, and 32% of students by ascending grade, declines of 4 points in 7th [grade] and 6 points in both 9th and 11th [grades],” the survey’s authors found.

“Current use occurred among 2%, 9%, and 17%, down 3 to 4 points, depending on grade.”

The rates of alcohol and other drug use have been on steady downward trends since at least 2011, according to the survey. Recreational legalization after voters’ approval in 2016 didn’t interrupt that decline, nor did the growth of the medical cannabis market in the preceding years.

Steep Cannabis Use Drops Across All Grades

Grade 7 Grade 9 Grade 11
2013-2015 2015-2017 2013-2015 2015-2017 2013-2015 2015-2017
Current marijuana use, past 30 days (%) 5.0 2.3 13.4 9.5 20.1 16.7
Ever used marijuana 7.9 4.2 23.1 17.4 37.9 31.9

California student marijuana use survey results, in percentages.

Teens indicated in the survey that a combination of peer and parental disapproval is discouraging them from using cannabis, with the number of seventh- and ninth-graders who said that they strongly disapproved of peer marijuana smoking increasing most sharply.

Results of the survey include data collected between 2015, before 57 percent of California voters approved Proposition 64, which immediately legalized cannabis for adults 21 and over in November 2016, and 2017.

While commercial medical cannabis sales have been widespread in the state for years, the new study does not take into account any potential effect from legal recreational commerce, which began on January 1 of this year.

“How the recent legalization of marijuana use for adults in California effects the declining trend among youth warrants attention,” the survey’s authors wrote.

“The next biennial survey will be of particular interest to shed light on whether the change in state marijuana laws affect these findings.”

However, the survey seems to provide initial validation for claims from marijuana legalization supporters who say that ending prohibition does not encourage more young people to consume cannabis.

In a statement, Tim Torlakson, the state Superintendent of Public Instruction, said that educators “must continue to be diligent in our efforts to prevent, or at least limit, marijuana use in light of the potential effect of the legalization for adults as a result of the passage of Proposition 64 two years ago.”

The survey was conducted by the California Department of Education and the California Department of Health Care Services.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Teen Marijuana Use Is Down In California Following Legalization, State-Funded Study Shows

Teen Marijuana Use Down In Most Legalized States, Federal Data Says

Teen Marijuana Use Down In Most Legalized States, Federal Data Says

Contrary to fears raised by marijuana opponents, teen use of cannabis is trending downward in most states that have legalized it for adult use.

According to new data from the federally-funded National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), the percentage of Colorado teens who used marijuana in the past year is down more than two points in the 2015-2016 version of the study as compared to the 2014-2015 edition.

The same is true in Washington State. In Washington, D.C., the drop was nearly three points. A smaller decline was seen in Oregon, while Alaska showed a slight rise.

Annual teen cannabis use is also down across the U.S. as a whole, but the drop was less significant than that experienced in Colorado and Washington, the first two states to legalize marijuana.

Percentage Of 12-17 Year-Olds Who Used Marijuana In The Past Year

STATE 2014-2015 2015-2016
Alaska 18.44 18.86
Colorado 18.35 16.21
District of Columbia 16.55 13.58
Oregon 17.56 17.35
Washington 15.61 13.54
Total U.S. 12.86 12.29

Similar drops were seen in most legalization states for monthly teen cannabis use as well.

Percentage Of 12-17 Year-Olds Who Used Marijuana In The Past Month

STATE 2014-2015 2015-2016
Alaska 10.64 10.43
Colorado 11.13 9.08
District of Columbia 8.85 8.07
Oregon 9.42 9.77
Washington 9.17 7.93
Total U.S. 7.2 6.75

Colorado and Washington State legalized marijuana in 2012, with Alaska, Oregon and Washington, D.C. ending cannabis prohibition in 2014. (Four additional states voted to legalize marijuana in 2016, but those programs weren’t running when the new survey was completed.)

While legalization opponents have long argued that ending prohibition would lead to skyrocketing use by young people, that doesn’t seem to be happening.

Advocates, on the other hand, have maintained that regulating and controlling the cannabis market and instituting strict age restrictions would actually give teens less access to marijuana than they had when it was illegal and there were no checks for age at the point of sale.

In a Facebook post, cannabis consulting firm Freedman and Koski, Inc, which is run by Colorado’s former top marijuana official, said that the drop in teen use in the state “coincides with an increase in funding prevention programs from cannabis taxes.”

https://www.facebook.com/FreedmanKoski/posts/1942988725965753

“Colorado is effectively regulating marijuana for adult use. Teen use appears to be dropping now that state and local authorities are overseeing the production and sale of marijuana,” said Brian Vicente, partner at Vicente Sederberg LLC, and one of the lead drafters of Colorado’s legalization measure. “There are serious penalties for selling to minors, and regulated cannabis businesses are being vigilant in checking IDs. The days of arresting thousands of adults in order to prevent teens from using marijuana are over.”

The new state numbers are part of a state breakdown of NSDUH data that was released last week.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Teen Marijuana Use Down In Most Legalized States, Federal Data Says

Medical Cannabis Laws Don’t Increase Teen Marijuana Use, Another Study Finds

Medical Cannabis Laws Don’t Increase Teen Marijuana Use, Another Study Finds

States laws that allow people with doctor’s recommendations to legally use medical cannabis don’t lead to increased teen use of marijuana, a new large-scale meta-analysis finds.

“Synthesis of the current evidence does not support the hypothesis that US medical marijuana laws (MMLs) until 2014 have led to increases in adolescent marijuana use prevalence,” the new study, published on Thursday in the journal Addiction, concludes.

Researchers at Columbia University and other institutions examined the results of 11 previously published studies looking at youth marijuana consumption prior to and after the enactment of medical cannabis laws in comparison with usage rates in states that do not allow any legal use of marijuana.

“For now, there appears to be no basis for the argument that legalizing medical marijuana has increased teens’ use of the drug,” Deborah Hasin, professor of Epidemiology at Columbia’s Mailman School and senior author of the study, said in a press release.

“Of the 11 studies included in the meta-analysis, none found significant (P < 0.05) changes in past-month marijuana use following MML passage within MML states (compared to comparable changes in non-MML states),” Hasin and co-authors wrote in the new study.

Hasin cautions that evolving medical cannabis programs and broader legalization of recreational marijuana could end up having an effect on teen use rates.

“However, we may find that the situation changes as commercialized markets for medical marijuana develop and expand, and as states legalize recreational marijuana use,” she said. “The $8 billion cannabis industry anticipates tripling by 2025. Obtaining a solid evidence base about harmful as well as beneficial effects of medical and recreational marijuana laws on adults is crucial given the intense economic pressures to expand cannabis markets”.

For now, though, the large-scale analysis shows that existing commercial access to marijuana through medical cannabis programs has not enticed more teens to use the drug.

“In summary, current evidence does not support the hypothesis that MML passage is associated with increased marijuana use prevalence among adolescents in states that have passed such laws up until 2014,” the study concludes.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Medical Cannabis Laws Don’t Increase Teen Marijuana Use, Another Study Finds

Teen Marijuana Use Declines Despite Legalization

Teen Marijuana Use Declines Despite Legalization

Teen marijuana us will always be a concern in the United States. Since Colorado and Washington legalized the retail sale and recreational use of cannabis for adults in 2012, the media interest in this topic has added fuel to the fear fire, especially now that Oregon and Alaska passed legalization measures in November.

According to the most recent addition of the Monitoring the Future study from the University of Michigan, however, parents may have less to worry about because teen marijuana use has actually declined despite legalization.

Teen Marijuana Use Graph

There was a five year pattern demonstrating an increase in cannabis use among teens until the release of the 2014 survey. In the last year, teens reported a 2 percent decrease. In 2013, 26 percent of 8th, 10th and 12th graders reported having used marijuana. In 2014, that number decreased to 24 percent. The lead investigator in this study, Lloyd Johnston, reported that according to the study,

“Personal disapproval of use is down some in 8th and 12th grades. Reported availability, on the other hand, is down significantly since 2013 in the two lower grades (and unchanged in 12th grade), which may help to explain the modest decline in use this year.”

If that is the case, the regulation part of the legalization movement may be working.

Reported daily use of cannabis has also slightly declined. In 2013, 6.5 percent of high school seniors admitted to daily marijuana use. That number decreased to 5.8 percent, or one in every 17 in 2014. The survey also showed a decline in the use of alcohol and cigarettes among the sample of students.

The University of Michigan conducts the Monitoring The Future survey from a sample size of 40,000 to 50,000 students in the 8th, 10th, and 12th grades from at least 40 different secondary schools throughout the United States. This is the 40th year for the study.

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