Jelly Belly Founder Introduces New CBD Jelly Beans

Jelly Belly Founder Introduces New CBD Jelly Beans

The Cannabidiol (CBD) industry is so hot right now that everybody from Martha Stewart to Montel Williams is trying to get in on a piece of the action. Now the creator of the original Jelly Belly jelly bean can be added to the list of CBD industry hopefuls.

Candy maker David Klein, the self proclaimed Candyman, created the Rolls-Royce of jelly beans in 1976, and now that CBD is no longer restricted in the United States under the Controlled Substances Act, he had the idea to combine the two to make a come back.

Klein sold his rights to the Jelly Belly name in 1980 in exchange for less than $2.5 million, which he received in the form of $10,000 per month for 20 years. This means that he is not able to label his new CBD-infused-beans with the Jelly Belly name. Instead, Klein’s new jelly beans are branded under the name Spectrum Confections.

“Everything I’ve done in my life was to get me to this point, and I truly believe I’m supposed to help people with my CBD jelly beans,” said Klein.

According to the Spectrum Confections website, they are currently sold out of pre-made product, but wholesale orders will still be accepted. Wholesale orders can be white labeled for self-branded packaging.

CBD Not Included

Spectrum Confections only manufacturers wholesale orders at this time, and unlike many other CBD candy distributors, they do not supply the CBD. Anyone interested in ordering the CBD infused jelly beans must first ship CBD oil or isolate to Spectrum Confections along with certified lab-test results displaying exactly how much CBD and THC is in the product.

Klein then uses the CBD that has been provided by the purchaser to infused his jelly beans. CBD isolate is preferred over the oil, according to Klein, and CBD containing more than 0.30 percent THC will be returned to the purchaser. They will only manufacture products that are legal in the United States, and anything containing more than 0.3 percent THC remains illegal under the Controlled Substances Act.

Original, Sugar Free, and Sour

There are three different types of Spectrum Confections Jelly Beans available in 38 different flavors according to the website: Original Jelly Beans, Sugar Free Jelly Beans, and Sour Jelly beans. One of the sour flavors is called “Sour Cherry Goosebumps.”

In order to “mask the CBD flavor,” the original and sour varieties are mixed with dextrose and malitol is used for the sugar free ones. According to Klein, CBD doesn’t taste great, so it is important to mask the taste of it.

10 Milligrams Each

The recipe used to make Spectrum Confections CBD Jelly Beans produces 10 mg of CBD in each bean. Purchasers are instructed to eat one if they want to consume 10 mg of CBD, eat two if they want to ingest 20 mg, and so on. Compared to many other products, that is delivering a solid dose of CBD in a tiny package. Many other candies containing 10 mg of CBD are eight times the size or more of a jelly bean.  

Two pounds of Jelly Belly Jelly Beans go for about $10.50 on Amazon, but the price of the Spectrum Confections Jelly Beans remain a mystery until you contact the company to place an order.

The Come Back…Again

This is not the first come back that the Candyman has attempted in recent years. Klein turned to Kickstarter in 2016 to crowd source funding for his new Coffee House Original Jelly Beans which were infused with caffeine and came in flavors like Chai Tea. He successfully raised $13,650 from 232 contributors.

Klein is also currently working on a creation he calls Polar Corn, a popcorn treat that you “freeze and eat.”

Photo Courtesy of Spectrum Confections

Video: Cops Search For Marijuana in Hospital Room of Missouri Man Suffering from Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

Video: Cops Search For Marijuana in Hospital Room of Missouri Man Suffering from Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

A Missouri man suffering from stage-four (IV) pancreatic cancer endured a police raid on his hospital room Thursday, as officers searched his belongings for cannabis.

As far as Nolan Sousley was concerned, he was about to have his best night of rest in recent memory because he could go to sleep knowing he was surrounded by medical professionals that could save his life if his health took a turn for the worse while he was asleep. As the Catalina Wine Mixer scene from the movie Step Brothers played in the background, law enforcement officers entered the safe space of Sousley’s hospital room just as he was about to get some sleep.

Sousley was diagnosed with stage IV pancreatic cancer in May of 2018. By the time his condition was diagnosed, it had already spread to his liver, qualifying his cancer as stage IV.

Cancer can be categorized as any stage between zero (0) and four (IV). Cancer categorized as stage zero has not spread from the location in the body where it originated. Stage zero cancer is often considered to be highly curable because it has not spread. By the time cancer is categorized as stage four, it means that it has spread to the organs or other parts of the body. Patients suffering from stage four cancer are fighting for their lives.

The Search

Police officers from the Bolivar Police Department in Missouri received a call from the hospital’s security guard on March 7 complaining that Sousley’s room smelled like marijuana. Sousley had already been admitted to the hospital for two days.

According to Sousley and his girlfriend and caregiver Amber Kidwell, the hospital security guard had entered their room earlier in the evening on Thursday, March 7, to ask if they were smoking marijuana inside. Sousley denied the allegations, and the next thing they knew, there were three law enforcement officers in the hospital room searching their belongings.

https://www.facebook.com/258186344838873/videos/256897601910427/

When police arrived to begin the search, Sousley admitted to officers that he had swallowed capsules containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) oil earlier in the evening when he was downstairs and outside of the hospital.

Sousley explained that he did not have any more of the THC pills with him in the hospital. Even though Missourians voted to legalize medical cannabis four months earlier, Sousley had been careful to keep it outside and not bring it inside the hospital’s private property.

Sousley began recording the scene with his mobile phone shortly after the officers arrived.

The Video

There were at least three Bolivar police officers in the room for the search, and some criticize that they should have been on the streets protecting the community from dangerous criminals instead of inside the hospital room of a sick Missourian searching for a plant that was recently legalized in the state.

The video begins with the three police officers in the room. One officer is riffling through a bag, and the situation quickly becomes tense. Sousley begins speaking with one of the officers in the room who is not actively searching any of the belongings.

“Here they are. I had some capsules that had some THC oil in them,” Sousley said to the officers quite early on in the recording. “I took them outside on the parking lot.”

Sousley’s friend who in the hospital room with him at the time, Tim Roberts, begins explaining to the police that Sousley uses THC oil pills to treat the debilitating symptoms of stage four cancer and chemotherapy like pain, extreme weight loss from a loss of appetite, and nausea.

As Roberts is calmly explaining the facts to the officer, Sousley interrupts to say, “I’m going to get arrested. They already told me I’m going to get arrested.”

“If we find marijuana, we will give you a citation,” responded the Bolivar police officer, clarifying the extent of the situation. “We’re not taking you down to the county jail. But we haven’t found marijuana, so we’re not citing.”

“Why are you digging in this stuff?” Sousley asked continuing to be disgruntled. “I told you where I took it.”

To which the officer replied, “Because we got a call.”

Sousley admits that he was up front with all of his doctors and hospital staff about his use of cannabis. Like many other cancer patients, he chooses to take THC oil instead of the opioids he is prescribed.

As the search continues during the video, Sousley gets more upset. “I want to know why it’s a big deal if it is really legal in Missouri now?” he asked. “Medically in Missouri it is really legal now. They just haven’t finished the paperwork.”

“Okay well then it’s still illegal,” the officer replied.

“But I don’t have time to wait for that, man” Sousley said. “What would you do? Tell me what you’d do.”

“I’m not in that situation, so I’m not playing the what if game,” said the officer.

“You’ve never said you’d do anything to save your life?” Sously continued. “What if you had 5 kids?”

Before the officer can formulate a response to Sousley questions, Roberts interjects. “It’s not worth the argument right now. Do your jobs,” he said. “We’re not going to have the debate. Hush up.”

The silence doesn’t last long before Sousley starts speaking again.

“It’s my right to live. We’re Americans,” he said. “I was born here. It’s my right to live.”

Seconds later, a doctor enters the room. One officer explains to the doctor, “We got a call saying they could smell marijuana when they walked in the room.”

“There is no way they could smell it. I don’t smoke it. I don’t ever use a ground up plant,” insisted Sousley. “It’s an oil that i use in a capsule, so there is no smoking it. I take it like a pill.”

The physician then calmly asks the officers, “Do you guys have probable cause to search his stuff? Do you have the right to search his stuff, or do you need a warrant for that?”

“We have the right,” said the officer. “It’s on private property.”

“Alright so what’s the proceeding here?” the doctor asked the officer. “He needs to be here. If you take him, it would be problematic.”

“We’re just here because they called saying they smelled marijuana in the room,” the officer explained. “We’re trying to either find yes there is marijuana or there is no marijuana. And if we find it, we’ll cite it. We’ll leave and give him a citation.”

Once officers finished searching all of the bags in the room except for one, they asked to search the one remaining bag that Sousley was keeping behind him and refusing to subject to a search. In the video, Sousley insists that he already showed the officers the empty plastic bag that had contained the THC capsules before he swallowed them in the parking lot, but he was refusing to let them search the duffel bag that held the plastic bag of THC oil capsules.

“If we could just search it and declare there is no marijuana in it,” bargains the officer. Meanwhile, the physician in the room is attempting to calm the situation by asking the officers if they could just take the bags and leave the room to continue the search.

Sousley was sensitive about letting the officers search his personal bag. “It is my bag of medication. It has my final day things in there, and nobody is going to dig in it,” he said. “It’s my stuff. My final hour stuff is in that bag, and it’s my right to have it and i’m not digging it out here in front of anybody.”

In the end, Sousley did agree to let the officer he like the most search his personal bag after the other officers stepped outside the room.

No cannabis was found in Sousley’s room, and officers departed without issuing a citation for possession.

After the video of the search went viral on Reddit, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook, Sousley and his Tribe of Warriors Against Cancer, received an outpouring of comments of love, support, and encouragement from strangers around the world.

To follow up with those who responded to the video, Sousley and Kidwell posted another video on the tribe’s Facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/258186344838873/videos/323251551872863/

What went wrong?

Voters in Missouri approved Amendment 2 in November of 2018, effectively legalizing the medicinal use of cannabis in the Show Me State. The measure passed with a 66 percent majority vote.

Once a legalization amendment is approved, it doesn’t help patients out right away. It takes time for the program to get up and running. It can take months or even years for the state to establish regulations and issue licenses to medical cannabis businesses.

It is often years after legalization before patients have safe, reliable access to medication. This is where the system is flawed. In the interim between voting to legalize and implementing the retail system, patients are forced to wait and suffer. They have to live in fear that they could be arrested, ticketed, or fined for possessing a plant that is their medication.

Patients in Missouri are not expected to have access to medical cannabis until 2020.

While some criticize the police officers for having performed the search after responding to the call, the real problem is the implementation of the system.

What do you think about this situation? Should the officers have followed through with the search of Nolan’s hospital room? Tell us in the comments.

Nolan’s Tribe of Warriors Against Cancer

Sousley was not available for comment when we reached out to him, but he did comment on his YouTube page:

“Thank you too everyone. I still don’t know my rights. I am home from hospital. Loving all the comments, care, and concern. But mainly love for mankind. I have missed that the last what? Twenty years? Thirty years? Been a long time since we were civil. Love you all my fellow human beings. Let’s fight. Let’s win. #terminallivesmatter,” Nolan commented on the video he uploaded to YouTube.com.


Both Nolan and his girlfriend and caregiver Amber have had to take days off from work as a result of Nolan’s health issues. Theystarted a Go Fund Me page to try to raise funds to help them during this difficult time.

Missouri Medical Cannabis Law

Missourians voted to legalize medical cannabis in November 2018. The new law dictates that patients who qualify for the program are legally allowed to possess and use cannabis for medical purposes.

Once the program is up and running, state-licensed physicians will have the right to recommend cannabis to any patient suffering from any condition that they think could benefit from cannabinoid medication. Unlike most other medical states, there is no list of qualifying conditions in Missouri. Medical cannabis recommendations are up to the discretion of the state-licensed physician.

Once a patient receives a recommendation from a doctor, he or she will receive a medical cannabis patient identification card which will allow the patient to purchase up to four ounces of dried cannabis flower or other products from a dispensary each month.

The state is responsible for issuing business licenses to cultivators, manufacturers, testing facilities, and retailers. Patients and their registered caregivers are also permitted to cultivate up to six of their own cannabis plants at home.

Photo Courtesy of Facebook

David Irving Quits the NFL While Smoking a Fat Joint On Instagram Live

David Irving Quits the NFL While Smoking a Fat Joint On Instagram Live

While smoking a joint and streaming live on Instagram Thursday night, David Irving, defensive lineman for the Dallas Cowboys, announced that he is quitting his job with the National Football League (NFL).

“Basically, guys, I quit. I know they’re talking about a suspension and all this other nonsense. I’m out of there. I’m not doing this sh** no more,” Irving said during the video stream on Instagram Live.

Irving completed the live stream in response to being suspended indefinitely by the Cowboys after his urine tested positive for the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite again. This is the third time he has been suspended in four years for failing to abide by the league’s outdated drug policy.

“Everyone questions my commitment to football,” he said. “But let’s it straight…I love football…However, I don’t love the NFL. The NFL isn’t football.”

Like many others, Irving has expressed many times that he believes NFL players should be permitted to medicate and treat injuries with cannabis instead of opioids if they choose. He supports the #plantsoverpills movement with the hashtag proudly displayed at the top of his Instagram page. He also repeated the statement multiple times during the nearly 20 minute Instagram Live video stream.

One thing was made clear during the stream: Irving thinks it’s bullsh**.

“We got this opioid thing going on and I’m prescribed all that bullsh**, and I just think it’s bullsh** that we’ve got to deal with that policy,” he said during the Instagram Live stream. “Everyone thinks it’s about smoking weed. It’s not about smoking weed. It’s much bigger than that. Much, much bigger. Hell, I have concussions every day. I get to see around the office how that f—s your head up and I feel it.”

“How many NBA players you see getting in trouble about this? How many coaches you see get in trouble about this? How many baseball players get in trouble? How many UFC players getting in trouble? How many actors? Not many, but you do see us football players,” Irving said.

While some are saying that Irving is quitting the NFL solely because of it’s cannabis policy, he insists that is not the only reason.

“If I’m going to be addicted to something, I’d rather it be marijuana, which is medical,” Irving continued. “I do not consider it a drug, rather than the Xanax bars or the hydro[codone] or the Seroquel and all that crazy sh** that they feed you. Like I said, it ain’t about smoking weed.”

While his point is valid and worth noting, some criticize the way Irving went about delivering the message. It is possible that it could have been more well received by a larger audience if he had expressed his views in a different manner.

Irving has joined the ranks of so many other NFL players, both active and retired, who have spoken out in support of using cannabis to treat symptoms caused by injuries sustained during games, like concussions, muscle tears, and broken bones.

NFL players can only be drug tested from April through August. If a player does not fail his drug test the first time, it will be another year before he can be tested again. This is how some players are able to medicate with cannabis during the season, assuming they are able to pass the drug test the first time.

At only 25 years old, Irving was a promising player in the NFL when he was able to stay on the field. He made four tackles and one sack in the only two games he played for the Cowboys during the most recent season. The season before that, Irving sacked the quarterback seven times in eight games. He was about to become a free agent, but apparently he no longer has any interest in exploring his options with the NFL.
What will Irving do next if he isn’t going to play football? He says he has big plans for the future, and that they will be revealed soon enough. Perhaps Irving will follow in the footsteps of other ex-professional-athletes like Tiki Barber and Ricky Williams by launching his own cannabis brand or investing in an existing cannabis business.

Legal Cannabis Spurs Increase in Cookie Sales, According to Study

Legal Cannabis Spurs Increase in Cookie Sales, According to Study

Furthering the mystery of the cannabis-induced munchies, adults with safe, reliable access to legal recreational-cannabis spend more money on cookies, ice cream, and chips than their counterparts, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Connecticut and Georgia State University reviewed high-calorie-food sales-data from states that have legalized cannabis, and a correlation was observed.

The retail-data analysis covered more than 2,000 counties over a period of a decade, from 2006 to 2016. Only states that could provide at least 18 months of sales-data for the period after a legalization amendment was enacted were included in the data review. Purchase trends from grocery, convenience, drug, and mass distribution stores were included in the analysis.

Michele Baggio, assistant professor of economics at the University of Connecticut, partnered with Alberto Chong, a professor at Georgia State University’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, to conduct the data review. Most of the data was contributed by the Nielsen Retail Scanner database.

The Data Review

Immediately following legalization, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington reported an increase in the purchase of junk foods, specifically those of cookies, ice cream, and chips, according to the study.

Chip purchases increased by 5.3 percent. Cookie sales grew by 4.1 percent, and a 3.1 percent increase was observed in the sale of ice cream. While cookie sales maintained steady growth, there was a slight dip in ice cream and chip sales for a short time after legalization. Ultimately, an increase was observed overall.

“The increase in sales starts at the time the legislation becomes effective,” according to the study published in the Social Science Research Network.

Legalization amendments were approved by voters in Colorado and Washington state in 2012. The legal retail market in Colorado was first to explode, while the Washington market took a little longer to kick off. In 2015, Oregon joined the ranks of Colorado and Washington in the legalization of recreational cannabis.

“These might seem like small numbers, but they’re statistically significant and economically significant as well,” said Baggio.

The brands which saw the most increase in product sales were not reported in the study.

Originally intending to study the effect of legal cannabis on obesity rates, Baggio and Chong focused only on sales trends this time instead. Baggio said he plans to continue searching for links between legalization and obesity as well as other trends correlating with cannabis policy reform.

“I’m just interested in whether there are unintended consequences to the policy,” he said.

Why does cannabis sometimes stimulate a hunger response?

While the source of cannabis-induced munchies remains mostly a mystery, a 2014 study published in Nature Neuroscience suggests that it begins with an enhanced sense of smell.

According to the study, the sensitivity of receptors in the olfactory bulb of rats and humans increases with the administration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most prevalent psychoactive cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. This increased sensitivity to certain smells may translate into an increased craving for certain foods.

While THC is known to stimulate a hunger response, tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) is known to illicit the opposite response. Cannabis strains high in THCV are advertised as the go-to phenotypes for those trying to lose weight or at least avoid the munchies.

Photo by Oleg Magni from Pexels

THC Provides More Symptom Relief Than CBD, According To New Study

THC Provides More Symptom Relief Than CBD, According To New Study

Cannabidiol (CBD), the non-psychoactive cannabinoid praised for medicinal powers like reducing the severity and frequency of seizures in children suffering from rare and otherwise untreatable forms of epilepsy, may not be the most medically beneficial molecule found in cannabis, according to new data.

The U.S. government and people who are uncomfortable with the high that is produced by the main psychoactive cannabinoid occurring in cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), have accepted CBD with open arms in recent years by adding it to coffee, skincare regimens, and personal lubricant. Meanwhile, THC remains federally illegal under the Controlled Substance Act.

A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports on February 25, 2019, compared data submitted to the Releaf App between June 6, 2016, and March 5, 2018. During that time, 3,341 users of the app reported results from 19,910 different cannabis-use experiences.

This data study is the first to measure how different characteristics of cannabis produce different effects in users.

During the reporting process from the app, users record details like what type of product they are using, what the reported cannabinoid content is, and which method of delivery is being utilized per experience.

The different types of cannabis products reported include:

  • Concentrates
  • Dried flower
  • Edibles
  • Tinctures
  • Topicals

The different methods of delivery include:

  • Smoking or combusting
  • Vaporizing
  • Ingesting
  • Applying topically

Data Tracking

The Releaf App was designed with new medical patients and cannabis users in mind, aiming to help them understand what works best to treat their specific symptoms or condition by tracking how different strains and methods of delivery affect them. The app also records the lab-reported level of each cannabinoid, like THC and CBD, that is in each product. Adverse side effects, like dry mouth and paranoia, are also reported by users.

Users record how they feel before consumption and then again immediately following administration to understand which method provides the most relief.

CBD VS. THC

While the levels of CBD in a product did not correlate with the symptom relief that was reported, the products with higher levels of THC were strongly linked to symptom relief, according to the Releaf App data.

Dried flower was the most commonly used product during the period of time studied. Dried flower with higher levels of THC was the only product reported to provide the greatest overall symptom relief.

Unlike the relief related to levels of THC, higher CBD content did not correlate with symptom relief, according to the data.

While cannabinoids can still be medicinally beneficial when only one is administered at a time, those aware of the entourage effect understand that cannabinoids work most effectively in conjunction with one another.

This data is a prime example of why cannabis should be removed from the Controlled Substances Act so that scientists can finally have access to the plant for research and studies.

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