Tres Star Strain Review

Tres Star Strain Review

It’s always nice when a dispensary employee is able to make the perfect recommendation for a new strain. Tom, at The Haven: A Strainwise Dispensary in Denver, recently recommended that I try his favorite strain — Tres Star.

While Tom didn’t believe Tres Star was exclusive to Strainwise, he did mention that it was not readily available at any other dispensary in Denver of which he was aware. Although I was already convinced by Tom’s explanation of the effects he feels from this indica-dominant hybrid strain, I was pleasantly surprised when his colleague Racarra made the same recommendation as one of her favorites.

Strain

Tres Star

Genetics

Stardawg x Tres Daughter

Dispensary

The Haven: A Strainwise Dispensary, 777 Canosa Ct #102, Denver, CO 80204.

tres star strain review

Aesthetic

These Tres Star flowers were dense and surprisingly not dry at all, something that those of us living in Denver have become accustomed. Tom did mention that it was freshly harvested, and just arrived on the shelf. Clearly hand-trimmed, both nugs faded from darker green on the outside to lighter green on the inside with an above-average amount of kief. These flowers also had a nice covering of burnt-orange colored hairs.

tres star strain review

Aroma

This sample of Tres Star smelled sweet and earthy with undertones of fuel and citrus fruit. The smoke had a similar taste, but the fruitiness was more prominent in the smoke than the aroma.

Consumption

This Tres Star broke up easily, and the resinous trichomes stuck to my fingers like glue. I smoked it out of a glass spoon pipe using a hemp wick instead of a lighter to preserve the integrity of the taste. This was one of the smoothest-hitting strains I’ve ever smoked. With absolutely no coughing or throat irritation, I barely even noticed I was exhaling smoke. A good sign that the plants were flushed and cured properly, the ash left in the bowl when I was finished was almost completely white.

tres star strain review

Effects

After just two hits of Tres Star, I no longer noticed the post-operative pain I’d been feeling in my foot for weeks. Within minutes, I felt extreme relaxation throughout my entire body, including muscle tension relief, and a light tingling sensation on my skin. Tres Star definitely enhanced my sense of touch, so it may be a good one to add to your list of strains to bring into the bedroom.

The cerebral effects were minimal, leaving me relaxed yet clear-headed with the ability to focus on work. In-line with the typical description of an indica strain, the effects I felt were much more body-heavy than cerebral. Based on the effects I felt and the aroma of this Tres Star, it likely contains a decent amount of limonene, a terpene known to be beneficial in the treatment of conditions like anxiety, depression and inflammation.

Tres Star would be a good strain for an evening out with friends, or for those seeking daytime pain-relief. It would also likely be a good choice for those suffering from PTSD or PMS.

https://youtu.be/qiDZ9j3cNmA

tres star review

DEA to Consider Rescheduling Cannabis in 2016

DEA to Consider Rescheduling Cannabis in 2016

In response to a letter from seven U.S. Senators including Elizabeth Warren, the DEA has indicated it will review its classification of marijuana as a Schedule I substance within the first half of 2016.

“DEA understands the widespread interest in the prompt resolution to these petitions and hopes to release its determination in the first half of 2016,”

DEA said in a 25-page response.

Warren’s original letter asks the DEA to acknowledge the mainstreaming of medical marijuana. “While the federal government has emphasized research on the potential harms associated with the use of marijuana, there is still very limited research on the potential health benefits of marijuana — despite the fact that millions of Americans are now eligible by state law to use the drug for medical purposes.”

DEA drug scheduling, under the Controlled Substances Act, classifies substances based on their medical uses and potential for abuse. Currently, marijuana is grouped with heroin as a Schedule I substance, a category that is reserved for drugs deemed the most dangerous, highly addictive and of no medicinal value. Comparatively, methamphetamine, cocaine and most prescription painkillers that are currently part the opioid epidemic fall into the Schedule II category, a classification which permits doctors to prescribe them and researchers to access them for studies.

dea rescheduleThe Reschedule 420 smoke-in demonstration in front of the White House on April 2, 2016 (Photo by John Kagia/Whaxy).

While experts and advocates agree that cannabis should be de-scheduled completely, rescheduling the plant as a Schedule II substance would allow for more collaborative medical research and fewer criminal penalties for possessing marijuana. Currently, medical marijuana research is done on a small scale in the United States or in other countries with favorable legislation.

In their response to lawmakers, the DEA mentions that between 2000-2015, it provided marijuana to researchers at a rate of about 9 per year. The bureaucratic complexity of doing legal cannabis research has led many universities and organizations to abandon it all together.

“That number is totally insufficient to meet public health needs and to answer the number of [research] questions that pop up yearly,”

said John Hudak of the Brookings Institute. “People just aren’t applying because of all the headaches involved.”

chuck rosenberg

While the DEA’s letter might be good news for marijuana advocates, acting DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg made clear last year that he has no intention of rescheduling marijuana, despite promising research, millions of people providing anecdotal evidence and legal medical marijuana programs in 23 states.

“If you want me to say that marijuana’s not dangerous, I’m not going to say that because I think it is. Do I think it’s as dangerous as heroin? Probably not. I’m not an expert,”

said Rosenberg. He later admitted that marijuana is not as harmful as heroin, a nod to the political agenda of drug scheduling. Similar proposals to reschedule cannabis made in 2000 and 2006 were also rejected by the DEA.

“Almost half the states in the country have medical cannabis laws and major groups like the American Nurses Association and the American College of Physicians are on board,” said Tom Angell of Marijuana Majority. He also suggested that the Obama Administration should use executive powers to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II substance before he leaves office.

Hundreds of peaceful protesters who agree with Angell gathered in front of the White House for one of the largest smoke-in demonstrations in history on Saturday April 2 (click here to see photos from the rally).

Feature photo credit: John Kagia

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