UN Launches First-Ever Full Review Of Marijuana’s Status Under International Law

UN Launches First-Ever Full Review Of Marijuana’s Status Under International Law

For the first time ever, the United Nations (UN) is launching an in-depth review of whether marijuana is properly classified under international drug treaties.

In a related development, the UN’s World Health Organization (WHO) has announced that cannabidiol (CBD), a compound in marijuana that is increasingly used for medical purposes, does not warrant being controlled under the global agreements.

“The Committee recommended that preparations considered to be pure CBD should not be scheduled within the International Drug Control Conventions,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus wrote in a letter announcing the moves. “The Committee concluded that there is sufficient evidence to proceed to a Critical Review” of marijuana, hashish, cannabis extracts and THC.

That broader review is set for November, and follows the results of an initial pre-reviewconducted by WHO’s Expert Committee on Drug Dependence (ECDD) in June.

“A pre-review is the first step of the ECDD’s assessment process, where it is determined whether there is enough robust scientific information to proceed to the next step, called a critical review,” an explanatory document accompanying the new letter reads. “This initial evaluation is also an opportunity to identify gaps in the available scientific data. A critical review is carried out when there is sufficient scientific evidence to allow the ECDD to make informed an recommendation that the substance be placed under international control, or if its level of control should be changed.”

The reviews include analyses of the chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, epidemiology and therapeutic use of the substances.

If the UN ultimately decides to change marijuana’s status under international law, it would trigger a review on U.S. scheduling, according to provisions of the Controlled Substances Act.

“Thankfully the World Health Organization has accepted the challenge of evaluating the placement of cannabis in the 1962 Single Convention treaty,” Michael Krawitz of Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access told Marijuana Moment. “Cannabis placement in the treaty was done in the absence of scientific evaluation and has provided the basis for a moral campaign against drugs by the USA for many decades. Since our work on medical access to cannabis has been based upon scientific inquiry we know that any rational assessment of the evidence leads the observer to understand cannabis indeed has proven medicinal value and, compared to other medicines, has profoundly fewer negative side effects.”

Here’s what the UN experts have determined so far:

“There are no case reports of abuse or dependence relating to the use of pure CBD. No public health problems have been associated with CBD use,” an annex attached to Ghebreyesus’s letter reads, noting that research has shown it to be effective in treating epilepsy. “CBD has been found to be generally well tolerated with a good safety profile.”

“Cannabidiol (CBD) is not specifically listed in the schedules of the 1961, 1971 or 1988 United Nations International Drug Control Conventions… There is no evidence that CBD as a substance is liable to similar abuse and similar ill-effects as substances in the 1961 or 1971 Conventions such as cannabis or THC, respectively. The Committee recommended that preparations considered to be pure CBD should not be scheduled.”

When it comes to whole-plant marijuana and resin, ECDD’s pre-review found that while “adverse effects” are possible and that cannabis can cause physical dependence, its current categorization in international treaties “may not appear to be consistent with the criteria.”

“Several countries permit the use of cannabis for the treatment of medical conditions such as back pain, sleep disorders, depression, post-injury pain, and multiple sclerosis,” the document says. “The evidence presented to the Committee did not indicate that cannabis plant and cannabis resin were liable to produce ill-effects similar to these other substances that are in Schedule IV of the 1961 Convention on Narcotic Drugs. The inclusion of cannabis and cannabis resin in Schedule IV may not appear to be consistent with the criteria for Schedule IV.”

“The Committee concluded that there is sufficient evidence to proceed to critical review of cannabis plant and cannabis resin at a future ECDD meeting and explore further the appropriateness of their current scheduling within the 1961 Convention.”

With respect to extracts and tinctures of cannabis, the committee similarly identified health issues associated with consumption, but said “there is limited evidence of a withdrawal syndrome upon abrupt cessation.”

The committee also looked at THC itself and isomers of THC, and recommended that both be subject to critical reviews in November.

Ghebreyesus’s letter is addressed to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who will be the ultimate recipient of WHO’s recommendations on cannabis and related extracts and compounds following the review.

Guterres was prime minister of Portugal when that nation decriminalized all drugs, a move he touted last year in an address to the UN’s Commission on Narcotic Drugs. After the critical reviews are in, that body will vote on whether to alter cannabis’s status under the international treaties.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

UN Launches First-Ever Full Review Of Marijuana’s Status Under International Law

United Nations Panel Releases First-Ever Review of Marijuana

United Nations Panel Releases First-Ever Review of Marijuana

For the first time ever, a World Health Organization (WHO) committee is reviewing marijuana’s status under international law. And technical documents the committee recently released include several positive, evidentiary findings about the plant’s medical value.

The committee’s pre-review—which will be formally unveiled at its meeting next week—could ultimately go on to influence international drug policy, as well as the classification of cannabis under the laws of individual nations.

The moves by the WHO’s Expert Committee on Drug Dependence (ECDD) come about a month after the United States government requested public input on marijuana scheduling at the international level. That resulted in the submission of more than 17,000 comments that the Food and Drug Administration indicated would be used to inform the U.S.’s response and recommendations to WHO, which is part of the United Nations.

In addition to reaffirming its earlier findings that CBD is a low-risk cannabinoid that provides demonstrably positive health benefits for patients in a critical review, WHO’s new documentsalso look at the science of marijuana overall and examined cannabis tinctures and extracts, THC and THC isomers.

Here’s what the committee found

In terms of the potential risks of marijuana use, the committee first acknowledged that nobody has ever died from an acute marijuana overdose and described cannabis as a “relatively safe drug.”

Research indicating that marijuana use was associated with a greater risk of adverse cardiovascular events “appears at best to be weak,” the committee wrote.

Notably, the committee also cited a “wealth of preclinical literature” that shows cannabinoids “reduce cancer cell proliferation” and inhibit “cancer cell migration and angiogenesis in numerous cancer cell types.”

The therapeutic benefits of cannabis

Getting into medical properties, the committee’s pre-review examined several health conditions that often qualify patients for medical marijuana in jurisdictions that have legalized it. Those conditions include: appetite stimulation, chronic pain, epilepsy, neuropathic pain, opioid withdrawal, post-traumatic stress disorder and sleep disorders.

The committee’s review of existing scientific literature on the effectiveness of cannabis treatment for these and other conditions found evidence that cannabinoids reduce pain, promote sleep and improve motor function for individuals with Parkinson’s disease. However, one common theme in the pre-review was that not enough clinical research had been conducted for the committee to make a determination about the potential health benefits of cannabis for multiple conditions.

Michael Krawitz, a U.S. Air Force veteran and legalization activist who has worked for years to reform international treaties on marijuana, told Marijuana Moment that the evidence about marijuana’s medical benefits included in the review was insufficient. He said it was reflective of the “creeping slow nature of the international bodies,” which have not viewed marijuana reform as “a priority.”

“Why did it take so long?” Krawitz said. “Why is it 2018 and they’re just now reviewing a treaty that should have been reviewed in the ‘70s or the ‘80s or the ‘90s?”

In some respects, the research situation is a bit of a catch-22. Part of the reason for the lack of clinical research into marijuana is that it’s prohibited under international treaties, which bar United Nations (UN) member states from legalizing cannabis for non-medical or scientific reasons.

“Often, the U.S. government hid behind its obligations under the Single Convention to avoid expanding research into illicit substances, even as scientific and medical exceptions to prohibition were explicitly spelled out in the U.N. treaty for marijuana and other drugs,” the Brookings Institution’s John Hudak explained.

The last section of the new pre-review deals with the epidemiology of marijuana. While recognizing that cannabis “has some therapeutic potential,” the review also raised concerns about several short-term and long-term effects of use, which “may be relevant to public health.”

The acute effects, according to the commission, include “[c]ognitive effects including impaired short-term memory, altered judgement and impaired motor coordination, which increase the risk of injuries (best studied with traffic injuries under the influence of cannabis, where causality has been established despite some negative epidemiological results)” and “altered judgement,” which “may also lead to problematic decisions with respect to increasing risk of sexually transmitted diseases.”

The committee determined that heavy, frequent use was also associated with “[i]mpairment of the brain (especially of the adolescent brain),” “[p]oor educational outcome and partially lasting cognitive impairments, with increased likelihood of dropping out of school” and “[i]ncreased risk of chronic psychosis disorders (including schizophrenia) in persons with a predisposition to such disorders.”

Why this pre-review matters

Reform advocates hope that the pre-review will be accepted and there will be a subsequent call for a more in-depth critical review. That would involve a deliberative process allowing experts to provide the committee with new information before a final recommendation on cannabis’s status would be made to UN Secretary-General António Guterres.

Guterres is a supporter of broad drug policy reform. As Portugal’s prime minister, he oversaw the enactment of a law decriminalizing marijuana and other drugs. In a March speech before the UN’s drug policy body, he touted the success of that policy.

Krawitz said an ideal outcome of the current review would be a committee recommendation to remove cannabis from the international treaty’s list of schedule 4 drugs, which could ultimately free up member states to push ahead with their own reform efforts.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

United Nations Panel Releases First-Ever Review of Marijuana

Canada’s Ruling Liberal Party Endorses Drug Decriminalization

Canada’s Ruling Liberal Party Endorses Drug Decriminalization

Delegates at the national convention of Canada’s ruling Liberal Party have adopted a resolution endorsing the decriminalization of all drugs.

“The Government of Canada should treat drug abuse as a health issue, expand treatment and harm reduction services and re-classify low-level drug possession and consumption as administrative violations,” reads the measure adopted by party members on Saturday.

The resolution was pushed by Liberal MP Nathaniel Erskine-Smith.

The resolution touts the success of a drug decriminalization policy enacted in Portugal in 2001.

“Since 2001, in Portugal, the number of deaths from drug overdose has dropped significantly, adolescent and problematic drug use has decreased, the number of people in drug treatment has increased, the number of people arrested and sent to criminal courts has declined by 60%, and the per capital social cost of drug misuse has decreased by 18%,” it says.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres, who was Portugal’s prime minister when the country enacted decriminalization, recently touted the policy’s success at a UN narcotics meeting.

UN Chief Touts Drug Decriminalization In Speech To Narcotics Commission

The Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is currently working to enact a marijuana legalization bill.

Trudeau said he’s not ready to support broader decriminalization of other drugs yet, though.

“We’ll of course reflect on next steps for a broad range of issues they bring up. On that particular issue, as I’ve said, it’s not part of our plans,” he said, according to CBC.

The drug decriminalization resolution got the third-highest support out of all measures considered at the convention. Party members also adopted a resolution calling for the decriminalization of sex work.

Despite strong support for the resolutions from members at the convention, party leaders are not obligated to support the proposed policy changes.

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

Canada’s Ruling Liberal Party Endorses Drug Decriminalization

 

Richard Branson: The UN Wants To Decriminalize All Drugs

Richard Branson: The UN Wants To Decriminalize All Drugs

The United Nations may be on the brink of calling on the governments of all countries to end the war on drugs and effectively decriminalize the possession and use of all illegal drugs.

In a surprise post on his Virgin company website, Sir Richard Branson stated he had been shown a report by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) that dramatically changed the organization’s views on drug control.

Branson elaborated, the “as-yet unreleased statement” has been sent to many media outlets under embargo, but Branson went public with the news early due to the fear the UN will “bow to the pressure by not going ahead with this important move.”

“As I’m writing this I am hearing that at least one government is putting an inordinate amount of pressure on the UNODC,” he said.

“Let us hope the UNODC, a global organisation that is part of the UN and supposed to do what is right for the people of the world, does not do a remarkable volte-face at the last possible moment and bow to pressure by not going ahead with this important move. The war on drugs has done too much damage to too many people already.”

Branson has long been a proponent for the reform of drugs laws across the world, with this bold he moves he cements himself as a true ambassador for the war on drugs.

United Nations Begins Drug Policy Review

United Nations Begins Drug Policy Review

After legislation drafted by America’s first drug czar, Harry Anslinger, became law in 1937, a global wave of prohibition was launched. This included the United Nations, through which several global treaties outlawing marijuana are still in force today.

As an increasing number of states begin legalizing marijuana and even allowing regulated and taxed sales, the United States finds itself in a precarious and highly ironic situation: It is, technically speaking, violating the very international laws and treaties it originally encouraged.

All this may change, however — at least within the United Nations. According to Tom Angell, a prominent marijuana legalization advocate and founder of Marijuana Majority:

The United Nations is kicking off the first comprehensive review of global drug policies in nearly two decades this week, and a broad coalition of organizations is calling on the body to respect countries that legalize marijuana and enact other drug policy reforms.

This coalition, comprised of 100 organizations, is asking the U.N. to appoint a “Committee of Experts” to consider treaty reform. The Jamaican minister of justice, Mark Golding, made this proposal Thursday morning in New York.

The group, which includes the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch, is hoping to convince the U.N. to update its global drug policies with a sensitivity toward nations that have chosen to end prohibition and instead regulate drugs like cannabis.

“The administration’s call to respect countries’ right to try regulation rather than prohibition is a positive step for drug policy, as are other reforms the US has sought internationally.”

Said David Borden, executive director of StoptheDrugWar.org. He continued,

“It doesn’t make sense to oppose having a discussion within the U.N. about modernizing the treaties.”

In a statement, Borden also explained, “Minister Golding’s call for an Committee of Experts on drug treaty reform is a bold and historic step forward for global drug policy. Defenders of the status quo can no longer paint the idea of regulating and controlling drugs, as opposed to prohibiting them, as against the will of the international community or lacking political support. Now it’s time for governments including that of the US to step up and do all they can to make the global drug policy system more humane and more respectful of human rights.”

The wave of medical and recreational cannabis legalization throughout the world isn’t the only reason for the group’s action. Ending the violence and corruption in Latin America, epitomized by brutal drug cartel terrorism in Mexico, is also a central focus of this effort.

The April execution by firing squad of eight drug smugglers in Indonesia, which prompted international outrage, is a recent and glaring example of the need for international reforms that keep pace with not only global marijuana legalization, but also basic human rights.

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