U.S. Government Loosens Border Policy For Canadian Marijuana Industry Workers

U.S. Government Loosens Border Policy For Canadian Marijuana Industry Workers

Roughly one week before Canada’s legalization of marijuana goes into effect, the U.S. government has issued a clarification to an earlier policy announcement that many feared would prevent people who work or invest in the marijuana industry from entering the country.

“A Canadian citizen working in or facilitating the proliferation of the legal marijuana industry in Canada, coming to the U.S. for reasons unrelated to the marijuana industry will generally be admissible to the U.S.,” reads the clarification release on Tuesday by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Previous statements by Trump administration officials led to concerns—and resulting pushback from members of Congress—that any Canadian who is affiliated with the cannabis industry would be barred from visiting the U.S.

The new CBP clarification will likely be met with a sigh of relief from Canadians who work for or invest in marijuana businesses.

However, the updated statement does have a big caveat.

[I]f a traveler is found to be coming to the U.S. for reason related to the marijuana industry, they may be deemed inadmissible,” it says.

So as long as a Canadian isn’t crossing the border for the purposes of seeking investments for their cannabis business or for other reasons related to marijuana, they should be able to enjoy a visit to the U.S.

Canada’s legal marijuana sales go into effect next Wednesday.

Marijuana Stores Will Be Hard To Find For Most Canadians On Day One Of Legalization

See the original article published on Marijuana Moment below:

U.S. Government Loosens Border Policy For Canadian Marijuana Industry Workers

Lawsuit Filed to Stop Border Patrol From Seizing Medical Marijuana in New Mexico

Lawsuit Filed to Stop Border Patrol From Seizing Medical Marijuana in New Mexico

A registered medical marijuana patient in New Mexico, is suing the United States Border Patrol over his right to possess and use cannabis. Raymundo Marrufo filed the lawsuit to “cease questioning U.S. citizens regarding medical cannabis in any states where the use of medical cannabis has been approved.”

In yet another instance of state and federal law colliding, New Mexico’s laws allow Marrufo to possess and acquire medical cannabis. However, Marrufo must cross through a US Border Patrol checkpoint as part of his journey back home from La Cruces, where he acquires his cannabis. As is routine, Federal agents ask travelers crossing the checkpoint if they are in possession of any illegal drugs. Because marijuana is still illegal under federal law, Marrufo cannot answer this question clearly.

Marrufo’s formal court complaint, filed by attorney Jason Flores-Williams, explains his dilemma:

“If Marrufo answers ‘yes,’ he is a drug smuggler subject to felony indictment. But if Marrufo answers “no,” he could be guilty of lying to a federal agent.”

This contradiction means Marrufo could face federal charges for distribution, which carries a 7-year prison sentence as well as confiscation of personal property.

However, Flores-Williams is looking to the Rohrabacher Amemdment for clarity. As part of a 2015 appropriations act, this amendment prohibits the Department of Justice from enforcing federal law regarding “use, distribution, possession or cultivation of medical marijuana” in favor of state-level legislation. New Mexico’s medical marijuana statute, the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, became active in July 2007. It allows patients suffering from certain medical conditions to use cannabis if it is recommended by their physician. Marrufo suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a qualifying medical condition under the Compassionate Use Act.

The lawsuit further states:

“Whether it is a sense of entitlement, indifference or simply ignorance of the law, the court must immediately issue an injunction enjoining the United States Border Patrol from asking questions and conducting searches that violate that Rohrabacher Amendment.”

Flores-Williams insists that the lawsuit is not meant to criticize law enforcement, but seeks to resolve the discrepancies between state and federal law. “When there is confusion about the law and citizens require clarity about the law, then this is when judges have to do their job and review the law, review the arguments and bring us back a resolution so people can conduct their lives according to the law.”

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