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One housing developer in Washington, D.C. is taking full advantage of Initiative 71, which was approved last November and officially went into effect in February, by building new condominiums in the nation’s capital with cannabis grow closets built in.

Eric Hirshfield was tasked with building a four-story condo in the Park View neighborhood of D.C. and decided to include the cannabis closets as a feature alongside staples such as a wet bar and wine fridge. He thinks it’ll be the ‘wet bar of 2015’ and be incorporated into several new homes and condos in the near future.

(Source: Urban Turf)
(Source: Urban Turf)

Initiative 71 allows residents of D.C. to grow and consume their own cannabis for personal use, but does not allow the sale or purchase of cannabis.

“You can possess and you can consume, but you can’t sell,” Hirshfield said to NBC Washington. “How are you supposed to get your stash? Well, you can grow!”

The cannabis closets Hirshfield has built/is building are equipped with a water supply, drainage system, exhaust fan and a power supply so new residents can begin growing cannabis or other plants/veggies upon move in. He says once his plans hit the market, other developers have come forth inquiring about it for their own use, but nobody is following through with it.

Since Initiative 71’s passing last year, growing stores in the nation’s capital have thrived. Chris Washburn, owner of Let’sGrowDC, has seen a huge spike in business just in his store alone.

“Whether it’s people looking to grow legal cannabis in their house or just organic gardeners who want to be more self-sufficient, it’s a huge movement,” Washburn said to NBC Washington.

Hirshfield plans on incorporating cannabis closets in his future projects in D.C., but will leave it up to the residents as to what they use it for. One of the first buyers plans on using it to grow culinary herbs and plant seeds in the winter to replant once spring and summer come around again.

“It’s good for fellow Washingtonians who use marijuana in their respective homes legally,” the buyer told Urban Turf. “We just can’t partake given our livelihoods.”

Washburn says it would cost about $500 to install a cannabis closet setup into an existing closet, but the consent of a landlord is required. For now, Hirshfield will stick to building cannabis closets into his new homes and condos because of it’s unique appeal.

“The novelty of [having a cannabis closet] hasn’t quite worn off,” Hirshfield said. “But I would say there is more growing happening than people may realize.”

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