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A good friend told me sadly yesterday that Colorado had officially banned cannabis gummy bears in our previously bear-friendly state. Governor John Hickenlooper signed the bill into law last Friday, June 10th, making the cute little squishies illegal starting in July — so don’t count on taking gummy anything to your 4th of July picnic. Gummy fruits, worms, and any other gummy candies are thought to be too attractive to children for safety, and marketability might have been affected by this fact soon. The battle to remove the child-friendly aspects of cannabis products in Colorado and across the nation has been an ongoing controversy, but most people seem to agree that its better if cannabis isn’t packaged in manner that appeals to children. With more and more families having the conversation about what constitutes cannabis safety in the home, at school, and in the workplace, getting rid of some gummy bears molds doesn’t seem like a difficult dilemma.

How Do Edibles Have to Be Labeled in Colorado?

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In Colorado, as in many other states, edible marijuana products must be labeled to show that they have THC (cannabis’ psychoactive component) in them for child and adult safety. According to Rebranding Cannabis, Colorado edibles and any other marijuana product must be dispensed in a child-resistant exit container; include warning labels, a list of all nonorganic pesticides, and solvents and chemicals used in concentrates; and a complete ingredient list. If the product must be refrigerated, a standard serving limit and expiration date are also required. Colorado’s packaging cannot be designed to appeal to children, and the text must not be obstructed or smaller than 1/16th of an inch. New regulations, such as the “universal symbol” for THC pictured here, were applied to the industry in 2015, and Colorado cannabis businesses have since been trying to keep up with the changes.

How Do Edibles Have to Be Labeled in Other States?

In other states, such as Alaska, the label of marijuana products must include five statements about the risks of consuming cannabis, like text on its intoxicating effects, health risks, child risks, and pregnancy risks associated with its use. California requires statements about marijuana’s Schedule 1 Controlled Substance status and details on which pharmacologically active ingredients are included, such as CBD or THC. In Connecticut and Illinois, a unique serial number matches the cannabis producer batch and lot number for safety, and a terpene profile must be included in CT. D.C. requires the name of the cultivation center to be on the label, and Hawaii’s House Bill 321 limits lozenges, capsules, or pills to no more than 10 mg of THC. The list of requirements differs state by state, and if and when the federal government removes cannabis from its Schedule 1 list of controlled substances, these differing laws and regulations may have to be made simpler. For now, though, it’s best to acquaint yourself with your state’s edibles labeling laws whether you are a consumer or a businessperson.

All in all, I think we can all agree that cannabis marketing companies don’t need to appeal to children in most areas, although I can picture a future in which CBD is included in gummy vitamins – but maybe not in Colorado, and probably not for a long time. If cannabidiol continues to establish itself as brain protectant, that day might come a little sooner.

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