Injured Soldiers Receive Cannabinoid Gum from Adopt-A-Soldier

Published on December 26, 2014, By Marie Veksler

Health Marijuana News

medical marijuana for soldiers

Different forms of medicinal marijuana therapies are being used to treat many different debilitating medical conditions. The form most publicized by the media lately is the cannabidiol (CBD) oil that is showing success in treating children with epilepsy. Cannabidiol therapies have also been reported as successful in treating such symptoms as chronic pain, anxiety, nausea, and others associated with severe medical conditions.

Many states have approved medical marijuana amendments allowing for the use of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid. Now, through the Adopt-A-Soldier program, wounded American soldiers will also be receiving CBD medication in the form of CanChew chewing gum.

CanChew Biotechnologies teamed up with Medical Marijuana, Inc to produce the mint flavored medical marijuana gum made with cannabidiol extracted from industrial hemp. They donated the product to the Adopt-A-Soldier program so that representatives can hand them out to wounded members of the United States Army, Navy, Marines and Air Force.

Although this donation may be considered a step forward for the efforts being made to pass ‘The Veterans Equal Access Act,’ a bill introduced by Representatives Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.), which would permit VA physicians to prescribe medical marijuana to qualifying veterans. Medical marijuana is something that many veterans have publicly requested to have safe access to because it helps treat symptoms of such conditions as post-traumatic-stress-disorder. It is worth mentioning that Medical Marijuana, Inc (MJNA) is the publicly traded company criticized by the Project CBD report, “Hemp Oil Hustlers.” The special report found that, among other things, the cannabidiol oil product called Real Scientific Hemp Oil, sold by a subsidiary MJNA company called HempMeds, contained high levels of toxic materials and contaminants that should not be consumed by humans. Medical Marijuana, Inc. responded by filing a lawsuit against the testing lab, on grounds that the report made false claims.

Cannabinoid therapies cannot be evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration because marijuana remains classified as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act. The FDA has, however, recently approved at least two cannabidiol studies for the efficacy in the treatment of childhood epilepsy. One study will be conducted by the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and the other has already been recruiting child participants for locations in Texas, Georgia and Illinois. These studies, and more will need to be conducted to truly learn how beneficial cannabis may be to the future of medicine throughout the world.

photo credit: greencellar

This post was originally published on December 26, 2014, it was updated on October 5, 2017.

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