New York City Bodega Owners Fight For Their Right To Sell Cannabis

Published on February 26, 2019, By MassRoots

Legalization Marijuana News

bodega

Wouldn’t it be convenient to be able to buy all of your necessities like groceries, laundry detergent, beer, and cannabis from one store in just one stop on the way home from work? That may soon be a reality for the people of New York City.

Recreational cannabis is expected to be legalized in New York as early as this year, and the bodegas in New York City want a guarantee that they will be able to distribute the product when that happens. The United Bodegas of America held a press conference to make sure Governor Cuomo understands their intent.

Bodegas are the small, locally owned retail spaces, or convenience stores, selling any combination of beer, wine, cigarettes, lottery tickets, groceries, and other necessities in New York City neighborhoods. Bodegas first opened in the Hispanic communities of New York City during the 1940s. The concept expanded during the 1950s, and today there are 15,000 bodegas spread throughout the five boroughs of New York City.

Bodegas already have experience selling items that are highly regulated by the state, like alcoholic beverages, cigarettes, and lottery tickets, so incorporating the sale of cannabis would be an easy transition, according to bodega owners.

“Right now we sell cigarettes, we sell beer – we are highly regulated. There is no reason why we cannot be included in the packaging, distribution, and sale of marijuana,” said Fernando Mateo, a representative of the United Bodegas of America.

From a social justice standpoint, the bodega representatives are also calling for Gov. Cuomo to take into account the racial disparity in marijuana arrests. “All this money should not go to white-owned businesses. It should not go to corporate America. It should be shared with the underdogs,” Mateo said at the press conference.

Under Gov. Cuomo’s proposal cannabis would be tracked from seed to sale, just like in other legal states, but the production and distribution of cannabis would require different licenses. This is expected to make it more difficult for one company to take over, leaving plenty of room for small businesses to succeed.

The New York state legislature is still considering the legalization proposal that Gov. Cuomo presented last month.

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