An organization called Ohio Rights Group spent last year advocating for legalized medical marijuana in the state of Ohio. However, the group failed to collect the 385,000 signatures needed to put the medical marijuana amendment, Ohio Cannabis Rights Act, on the 2014 ballot. Now, a different group going by the name Responsible Ohio announced a campaign to put a full legalization amendment on the 2015 ballot.

The full legalization movement would allow for only 10 licenses to cultivate the marijuana, and an anonymous source reportedly told Cleveland.com that the group already has the millions in funding needed to collect enough signatures to place the initiative on the ballot next year. The funding is coming from the 10 property owners who would reserve exclusive rights to the cultivation of the plant, thus reserving exclusive rights to much of the legal marijuana profits.

The Responsible Ohio campaign is keeping most information secret at this time, but the group’s spokesperson, Lydia Bolander, did release the statement,

“Marijuana for medical and personal use should be a choice made by adults 21 and older in this state. We are going to end this failed prohibition. Legalizing marijuana for medical and personal use means increased safety because we will regulate, tax and treat marijuana like alcohol. We will smother the black market and use the taxes generated to help local communities provide vital public services.”

The amendment proposed by Responsible Ohio would set-up a Marijuana Control Commission to regulate the legal system. The group is confident that this would be possible because of the precedent set with a 2009 approval of the Ohio Casino Control Commission, which allowed for only four casinos to run in the state.

Few others familiar with marijuana initiatives in the state agree with the hopeful viewpoint of Responsible Ohio. For example, attorney Jon Allison who represents the Drug Free Action Alliance told Dispatch,

“If you put that creators of the Sopranos and Breaking Bad in the same room they couldn’t come up with a plot this far fetched. Perhaps the details will help clarify things but right now it sounds like 10 wannabe drug lords are going to ask Ohio voters to constitutionally protect their cartels and turf.”

The president of the medical marijuana activist organization Ohio Rights Group, John Pardee, also spoke out against this style of an amendment, explaining, “I’m against creating a constitutional monopoly.”

The group has until July of next year to collect enough signatures to place this full legalization initiative on the 2015 ballot.

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